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7

In general, the codes require fasteners to be of hot-dipped, zinc-coated galvanized steel in accordance with ASTM A153, type 304 or 316 stainless steel, silicon bronze or copper. [source] FWIW, everything you ever wanted to know about pressure treated wood here.


3

Stainless is the most reliable way to go, though hot-dipped galvanized is also an option. It wasn't an issue until CCA was phased out a few years back.


1

I'm not sure what preservative-treated means. [Edit: lower in the page it specifically reads "pressure-treated".] Around here, pressure-treated lumber is soaking wet and not suitable for stain/sealer until it's dried at least an entire season. If it's truly kiln-dried, you're free to apply a stain/sealer at any time. To preserve color and prevent surface ...


1

If you already bought (and can't return) 8 foot wooden posts and you want a 7 foot high fence (or "at least 7 feet") I would suggest not burying them at all, as that's doomed to failure. Put metal post bases (or metal posts) in the ground and bolt your wooden posts to them. Otherwise buy 10 or 12 foot wooden posts if you want 7-8 feet above ground and you ...


1

The answer is simply No. PT wood will warp if you let it sit. It would have to be in an ultra controlled environment to dry and not warp horribly.


1

Yes, let it dry. Working with wet treated wood is a very bad idea unless you like shrinkage, cracks, gaps, squeaks, etc. Let your framing and decking dry out first. Here in Oregon that means buy the wood and store it in a DRY place. Building with wet wood only causes issue later.


1

Wet wood is common when considering the PT stuff. Although not as easy to find, but there is such a thing as KDAT wood (kiln dried after treatment). You should consider the project and for things that will be exposed to the weather or high humidity, wet wood is OK, just heavy to work with. Two years of drying would only be required if you are building ...


1

I recommend the following procedure after cutting treated wood: Cut several pieces of untreated wood. Clean the blade and surrounding with a cloth with little synthetic oil on it. Repeat this procedure several times always using a clean fresh cloth. Here's why I recommend this: It is difficult to reach every point of your saw blade when just cleaning it ...



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