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12

They are not actually zinc, but zinc-coated steel, also known as galvanized steel. The treated-wood industry recommends the use of hot-dip galvanized or stainless steel fasteners for use with treated wood. Electroplated/electro-galvanized and mechanically-galvanized coatings should not be considered to be hot-dip galvanized. (Class 55, or higher, ...


10

The hot-dipped galvanized requirement isn't for load, it's to prevent corrosion. For less load, you can get smaller nails. However, if you don't use the hot-dipped galvanized, then the chemicals in the PT lumber will cause a reaction with the metals in the nails and they will corrode much faster than if the nail was installed in non-PT lumber. Here's some ...


10

This should be a good starter project, here are a few tips I've picked up over the years: Even pressure treated wood will deteriorate over time if it's exposed or in direct contact with the ground/moisture. Do what you can to protect it from the elements and get it raised off of the soil. Use a moisture barrier between wood and concrete. Take care to ...


8

You have to cut the wood somehow... You can give your blades a wipedown with a slightly damp rag to remove sawdust particles (let them air-dry well afterward), but I wouldn't worry too much. It's mostly a problem with long-term contact; the copper compounds in the chemical treatment cause a galvanic reaction with most metals, rusting them. To prevent this, ...


6

Ok Jay. A PT post will last a long time in concrete, maybe 5 to 10 yrs in soil alone. I suggest you imbed the post in concrete, trowel a peak around the post so water runs off, and don't let the PT post come in contact with the ground. If you find the RV posts I mentioned earlier, they are steel , treated and when put in concrete will last 25 yrs or ...


5

It's beneficial. Here in Texas, where it is humid and wet and we also have a lot of ground-based termites, I use TimBor for posts and rot sills in fences. The problem is, you want to have put that treatment on the wood before it goes in the concrete. At this point, your best method of preventing termites from getting into the structural portions of your ...


5

It's always good to inspect your deck every year after winter. Check for any loosening fasteners, any signs of rot, check for mold, and inspect places where wood meets wood. I would advise against an annual power-washing. It is extremely harsh on the wood, even if done by a professional. It requires a lot of work to restore the surface, as the pressure ...


5

Unless you have a kiln to dry wood in, drying wood in a standard environment takes a really long time (if you buy firewood, usually you want ~2yr old wood!). I don't know that leaving it out for a couple weeks would dry it if it were so saturated that there is visible water coming out of it. It is recommended to let wood used for hardwoods sit a couple ...


4

Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


4

A concrete post/form in the ground with some sort of above ground post or embedded post in the concrete is the way to go. Depending on what you want from your fence, ie: privacy, security, looks, etc. will effect what kind of materials to use for the actual visible fence. There are many choices of composite materials and vinyl products out there that are ...


3

It really depends on your surroundings and climatic conditions.I think the pressure treated timber posts concreted into the ground are good to go.You just have to follow these simple steps while installation: Remember the 1/3 rule while installing the post: that is 1/3 of the post length should be buried. STEP 1 Dig the hole widening out at the bottom. A ...


3

Wolmanized wood is a subsection of pressure treated wood. There are many different processes that fall in the preserved wood category and Wolmanized wood used a copper azole process. It is manufactured by Arch wood products.


2

I don't know about the cedar, but I built a screened porch a few years ago using standard PT lumber for posts and railings and painted it with a coat of primer and a coat of exterior latex pretty much as soon as it no longer appeared damp. Of course the 6X6 posts had been up and drying for a while at that point, probably 6 months or so. The railings were ...


2

It will not last long (7 yrs max) if the bottom of the post is wet. If you place stone at the base of the post, it should last 20+ yrs.


2

The quick answer is both/neither. You want pressure treated for any lumber that is exposed to the elements, especially moisture from rain or the ground. And you want the fence posts in concrete. The rule of thumb is 2/3 above ground, 1/3 below, so a 6' fence should be at least 3' in the ground. For the concrete, flair out the bottom of the hole to prevent ...


2

A lot depends on why you want the fence and how much room you have. Driving around Southern Ontario, I can easily see cedar rail fences that are over 100 years old, unmaintained, and have not fallen down. They don't even have posts! Cedar just won't rot, and they were constructed to be stable, let the wind and snow through, and endure. They take up a ton of ...


2

Pressure treated wood should be dried out before painting. 3 monthes - a year depending on climate. I would go with a good primer first before painting. Use floor paint for floor or just go with a solid stain.


2

You may not use electro-galvanized bolts for ledger or joist-beam attachments. See IRC 502.2.2.1. Hot dipped or stainless steel only. Electro-plated is also not appropriate for contact with treated lumber. It may be that the bolts you listed are hot-dipped, but usually those magic words are listed, due to the code requirements.


1

It probably depends on how much effort you're going to be putting into it. If you're just planning on slapping something together quickly, then sure, go for untreated, and if something goes wrong, you can rebuild it in a couple of years. I'd personally use pressure treated, as I'd have to make a larger structure due to local ordinances. (I can't store ...


1

I would recommend the stainless steel bolts. They cost more but are stronger and avoid the rusting and corrosion problems of steel bolts. The thing I like best - the stainless steel lag bolts have sharper well defined threads which cut nicely into a properly pre-drilled pilot hole for a superior holding power. Hot dipped lag bolts tend to mush themselves ...


1

Fresh Alkaline Copper Quaternary(ACQ) treatment leaves the wood very wet. In a month of dry conditions (in the sun), they will dry out and be much less splotchy. The green will eventually be gone, going to gray in 12-18 months. I know you didn't want to stain, but consider a light 'cedar' tone to even things out, until the green fades. Once dry (3-5 ...


1

I used PT lumber for my basement outer walls. I emailed PT lumber association (yes they have a website) and and asked how long I should wait before I slapped up the drywall. I was told that unless the lumber is in a very humid environment it will lose most of its moisture in 2-3 weeks. I waited a month to be safe. If the lumber is outside in warm weather ...


1

I'll tell you what I did, following the boys on "Ask This Old House": Pressure treated posts, 10' Hole dug with power awl to 4' plus a few inches Pea gravel in the hole bottom Set post on pea gravel and adjust height with more pea gravel Begin filling around post with pea gravel, tamping down frequently with big steel stick Fill with pea gravel to within a ...


1

The length of time will also depend on whether it has been cut after manufacture or not as well. The treatment does not always deep seep into the timber, therefore making any post delivery cuts may expose any untreated timber. Always best to retreat a fresh cut before installing.


1

No UC code could mean two things: either it was ripped off on purpose, or by accident, or its UC code is so low it doesn't rate to be classified (garbage). UC codes are "usage categories", running from UC1 (the lowest) to UC5 (the highest). But the UC code is only half of it. A UC code must be matched to the retention rating of the chemical injected into ...


1

It's pressure-treated just under a different process that is "greener". See the PDF here. If it's treated, then there are preservatives in the wood to prevent rot and as an insect-repellant.


1

I've heard to wait a year for it to fully dry out (so you could stain it next summer). I've also heard that you should never paint treated wood, and only use stains specifically designed for treated wood. I would talk to the guys at your local paint specialty store though as they would probably know a lot more about that than anyone and be able to tailor ...



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