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18

No, in general, you don't need to prime existing paint. To prepare for repainting: wash the wall to remove any grease. fill any holes and cracks with suitable filler, possibly using flexible filler for cracks. sand and prime the filled areas - priming will seal the filler and keep it in place. You might want to sand and reprime the whole wall to avoid a ...


7

If you want a really nice job, get a drywall pole sander and give the wall a quick going over with 200-250 grit paper before priming, and before your final colour coat. Remember to wipe with a damp rag (use the pole sander if you like) before applying any paint/primer.


5

I often make checklists for jobs, especially if they are a distance from my shop, and assures my helpers get all the stuff I want on the site. Rather than one word headings, I usually two or three checklists like 1) Tools and equipment. This includes the obvious tools and things like ladders, extension cords, compressor hoses and the like. 2) Material list. ...


5

To answer your question: it depends. The larger the screw, the more likely you'll need to pre-drill. If you're installing the screw near the edge, or if the screw is larger than maybe 1/8" wide on the solid part, then I'd pre-drill. To pre-drill, make the hole almost as large as the solid part of the screw (not the threads themselves, they need to have ...


5

First you need to remove the masking tape and the label prior to painting, or they will show through on the finished surface. Use Goo Gone or Goof Off as BMitch and Tester suggest. (I've never used Goof Off, so I can't vouch for how well it works, but I have firsthand experience on how well Goo Gone works.) Next you need to clean the surface, at least with ...


5

About a year ago, I prepared my concrete floors to be covered first with an overlay and then stained. My situation was a bit different, but I bet the prep needs to be about the same. You can read my blog post about the preparation we did on lauramakes.com. For your situation, you will want to use a floor scraper to remove anything loose on the floor, like ...


5

It makes me die a little inside when people paint over raw red brick.... That said, you tape and paper the walls where they meet the brick. Then you plastic from the paper as far out as you think you might overspray. You may even want to form a "curtain" out of the plastic to keep the brick in a make-shift paint booth. It is just as you would mask any ...


3

One paint company defines the various finishes as follows: Satin: A finish with a low luster appearance. Washable surface, reflects some light. Semi-Gloss: A finish that has noticable gloss and sheen. Washable, sometimes scrubbable surface, but shows surface imperfections. Reflects light noticeably Eggshell / Low Gloss: A finish ½ way between ...


3

There's one tip that was completely missed, and should have been at the start: When painting over a surface that has had to be repaired or was very dirty (scrub it clean first), get both the paint and the primer tinted to the same color. As long as you buy the paint/primer in the same brand and they are both the same base, you will have exact match. This ...


3

Priming is best. If you have to do two coats of paint to cover the old color, why not use a good primer or primer/sealer and one coat of a good paint? Most people will say otherwise, but primer will stick to old paint a lot better than new paint will. I recommend wiping the walls down with a damp cloth first, but it's a lot of work, and I've never done it ...


3

I have run into the same situation many times. Let me say first, that I don't condone doing work that requires permits without them, as it often leads to crappy quality or safety issues. I always prefer to do quality work, but occasionally budgets make it necessary to do a quicky fix. In your case, the most important thing is to strip away all old wax and ...


2

Just like wood you should apply a primer first. Then undercoat and finally the top coat (or two). The primer will stop the other paint just soaking straight into the MDF and the undercoat will give "body" to the finish. Even if you get a "one coat" paint I usually find that it needs two (or occasionally three) coats to get a good, even finish.


2

You could take a proactive approach and sand it in any case. This will lead to better paint adhesion which is a good thing. It is also a great idea to wash previously painted surfaces with a strong solution of TSP (tri sodium phosphate). Make sure to use good rubber gloves and hot water - for your protection and best results. The TSP wash does a fantastic ...


2

You'll have some waste with spraying. Considerably more than with a brush or roller, anyhow. Find the square footage---both sides---and divide 325 into it. You'll get about that amount, 325 square feet per gallon, if you're careful. You will likely need more than one coat… Also, make sure the surface has been well prepared by removing loose paint and ...


1

Glass tile on wallboard presents no special challenge. Glass tile on plaster is ok also, as long as it is not too uneven. You'll need trim on the top and bottom to make the transition look good. Also as @HerrBag alludes in the comments, glass tile is harder to get right compared to opaque tile.


1

I would look into renting a bull float and pulling one of the resurfacing cement products that have plasticizers in them. They can be troweled to knife edge thinness. If the floor has been sealed (does a drop of water bead up or absorb?), you may have to abrade the sealing off, to allow the new cement to bind. Latex admixtures are usually used to promote ...


1

Direct copy pasta from my question update: Well, I got antsy while waiting for answers (hey, it's a Sunday and people have better things to do than lurk SE), so I took matters into my own hands and picked up a mop with a wringable, rectangular sponge head from the drug store. What I did was get it wet and wring it out to dampness. After taking it from the ...


1

Couple more factors to consider before you paint. Whenever repainting old work, preparation is the most important step in the process. Old finishes need to be very clean, all soaps, residues removed and surfaces sanded or chemically deglossed. Be aware, any paints before 1978 may contain lead and should be tested and handled properly to avoid any health ...


1

EDIT: Comments above say that you have 1-2" of water. There is no solution for this other than fixing the drain. (Or going to marine style doors with a raised threshold.) What I've describe below can mitigate minor flooding, but won't help with the serious issue you seem to be having. ORIGINAL ANSWER: The proper long term answer is to fix the the ...


1

As BMitch has said, it depends on the size of the screw, how near you are to the edge, etc. It also depends on how hard/soft the wood is. The harder the wood, the more you should make a pilot hole near to the diameter of the inner threads. I'd say in hard wood, you should consider using a pilot hole when the inner threads of the screw are 1/8th of an ...


1

Assuming the kitchen unit doors are solid wood (not covered/laminated some how): Mark/Label the doors so you know which door belongs to which kitchen unit. Remove the doors from the kitchen units. Remove all hardware from the doors. Depending on how the doors are currently finished, you will either: Have to completely strip them back to bare wood. Or ...


1

Does someone come out and "close" your sprinkler system for the winter? I don't know much about lawn sprinkler systems, but "charging" sounds similar to opening a swimming pool. Every fall, I drain all the water out of the lines for the pool and plug them so the water doesn't freeze and crack the lines. In the spring, I then remove the plugs and prime the ...


1

Long, cold winters means the ground will freeze deeply. The frost will heave your structure. Snow is a good insulator, which will reduce freezing. But a wet autumn followed by a cold, dry winter will make the frost heaves deep and strong. Your local building department can tell you the specified frost depth, which leaves a suitable safety margin. The ...


1

I looked at your profile, but don't know what part of the country you are in. Where you are makes a lot of difference. The building you are considering is a wooden structure, fairly heavy and can hold some cargo. Any building that size deserves a decent foundation. If you don't support it right, it will warp, shift and bend with the seasons, resulting in ...


1

At Home Depot I always have them tint the primer the same color as the paint. They do that at no cost. Also after caulking or drywall repair is dry I paint those areas with one coat of paint or primer before starting on trim cut in work . When I paint body .It is dry. The paint is always blotchy if those areas haven't had an extra coat.



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