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For speed and precision, I do two things. I pre-drill the hole. That is especially important on hardwood. I often use special drill bits made for screws which include the countersink. I drive with a speed wrench and a bit holder. This gives speed, control and superb tactile feedback that tells you immediately when you are having some kind of a ...


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Two things to try: Pre-drill. By drilling a pilot hole in the wood, you're removing some wood to make space for the screw. Without a pilot hole, the screw is essentially wedging itself into the wood. This puts a lot more pressure on the screw as well as the wood. In weak woods, this can cause a split; with weak screws, the screw can break. Drill using a ...


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Sounds like you're using a sledgehammer to put in a thumbtack. A less powerful tool might be the answer. A pilot hole will allow the screw to be driven more easily, and may solve your problem. If the driver has a variable torque setting, try setting it lower. That way the clutch will slip before the screw breaks. If you're using phillips head screws and ...


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Alternatives that cover everything for DYI needs There is no such thing. Whatever you buy now, you will miss something at some point in your DIY life. It may be less obvious than it looks. My recent example: I was running a conduit in my garage, and was fixing the clips to the wall with screws. The bits that come with my electric screw driver turned out ...


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Variable speed will be used if you want to use the angle grinder as a polisher/buffer, as those wheels wont work as well at 10,000rpm.


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When shopping for an angle-grinder, how important is variable speed? The importance is use dependent. I think that using different disks (grinding, sanding, cutting, brushing, etc.) is a satisfactory way to get the most use from the grinder. I've never had any desire for a grinder that would go a different speed. Actually, I think that controlling the ...


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Here is how manufacturers make an appliance one voltage or another. electronic switch-mode power supply. These can input a huge range of voltage, for instance many fluorescent ballasts take 90-306V. If you see that, don't be surprised, it really works. The machine runs on low-voltage AC or DC from a pluggable "wall wart" transformer, and they simply ...


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What you used originally is what it used every day by professionals, handymen and DIYers alike. A drywall gun with fine thread drywall screws. For heavier studs drill-point drywall screws can be used. If what you did works for you then keep at it. It's just a lot slower than a drywall gun. So if this is just for you and small projects there is nothing wrong ...


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Chances are either 1) the brushes are shot, in which case it may be a cheap fix, or 2) the motor itself (bearings, windings) is just wearing out. In the latter case it's probably not worth the cost and effort to have a repaired very old saw. As to what you should buy, I have no idea what your needs are. I like Makita 5007 corded saws. A number of brands ...


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Repairing small hand tools is rarely economically feasible (even thought the thought of built in obsolescence/landfill overload is distressing). It sounds like a bad bearing, but the cost of the labor involved in changing would probably exceed the cost of a new saw. I would get a new one. Cordless tools are great, even in a shop. But circular saws need a ...


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When I have been in a similar situation (dead roots), this has worked for me: Dig around the root with a shovel to remove the bulk of the dirt in the way. Use a trowel, your hands, something smaller to remove the rest of the dirt near the root. Use a reciprocating saw (aka Sawzall) to cut through the root. This may take some time depending on how green the ...



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