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1

several [10W DC-DC converters] connected parallel to power bank and [mattress? inflation?] pump. Will it work? That is the wrong way to approach the problem. Use two power banks connected in serial way. In this case I suppose to get 10V. What if these power banks are different models? That is the wrong way to approach the problem. I would ...


5

Just some things I see on jobs all the time: Do not use a power drill (you want to keep mix things). You will blow out the motor in a good power drill by using it as a mixer. I see my guys use their Makitas with a mixing rod. And have seen many ruin them. I simply give them a 30 year old craftsman electric drill I have that I would give away for $5. ...


0

Drill pilot holes and gradually widen them. This saves you energy and reduces wear on your drill bits. Always use the supplied handle to brace the drill. This keeps you from injuring your wrist if the bit catches. All these answers are along the lines of "do these things" but the list of things to not do with a drill is infinite and includes things like "...


3

If you're drilling metal, use an appropriate type of bit (HSS, whatever), use some cutting lube, and drill for short periods with breaks between. Don't run the drill too fast either. If the bit overheats you'll ruin the temper and destroy the bit. Since the title of this question really should be "tell us the dumb ways you broke stuff", I'll mention that I'...


3

If you put a hole saw onto your drill, avoid going fast and always brace it well in case it catches. I have a bad wrist to show for careless hole saw use.


9

Some other helpful hints (not from Heloise) 0) ALWAYS wear gloves and eye protection. (Note: if you're using one hand to hold down the material being drilled, a glove can reduce injury if the drill bit jams. On the other hand, you should never depend on body parts to hold things in place) 1) When drilling into soft material such as plastic or pine, ...


4

Radial loads are bad. Axial loads are good. The bearings in your drill or drill press are designed to counteract the forces in line with the drill bit. A milling machine does both, and using a drill or drill press like a milling machine will destroy the bearings quickly.


3

a drill bit is not designed to cut on the flute like an end mill. However you will see many folks making a hole larger by moving the drill off axis. It works but not clean. The biggest advice I Could give is to use cutting oil and slower speeds when cutting metal the goal would be to have a long chip develop this shows your speed and pressure are correct for ...


2

Should I be worried if grease leaks from inside the new electric drill? No. You should only be worried if it continues to leak out after being regularly used and cleaned for a week or so. It looks like it might be a low-cost no-brand hand-held cabled electric-drill. So if it was bargain priced I'd be happy there is some evidence that the assembler used ...


3

It's a tool, and they use grease during assembly. The jaws of the chuck should have grease on the outer surface where they meet the collar. Spots of grease elsewhere are incidental and shouldn't be cause for concern. Those aren't necessarily assembled in "white glove" conditions. Further, once you use it, since it has moving/spinning parts, you might see ...


1

Yes: tag the red lead on T4 with electrical tape remove the red leads from T4 and 3, leaving the black lead connected to 3 connect the tagged red lead to 3 connect the untagged red lead to T4 (This is how you implement the "swap the red leads" procedure mentioned briefly on the nameplate.)


0

The #3 motor having ball bearings will outlast the sleeve bearings. A ball bearing motor can be run closer to 115% of FLA (full load amps) with creating as much heat. The larger Frame usually provides more torque at the same amperage. Small motors like this are usually rated in peak horsepower / 746W of consumed power is called 1 horsepower. This calculation ...



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