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19

They sell what is called an "Offset" drill. Instead of the chuck being inline with the motor, it is turned 90°. They also make drills where the chuck can be turned to get into tight spots. They also make an offset attachment for most drills.


19

Drills and impact drivers are similar in that they're both rotating power tools and they have some overlap in usage, but they work differently and have different strengths. Drills apply a constant torque and tend to have good control across a range of speeds and clutch settings. They're good for work that requires care or precision, like drilling a hole or ...


18

You can make straight cuts parallel to an existing edge by using a circular saw with a guide. To make the bottom edge of the cut clean, be sure the saw does not cut much more deeply than the thickness of the material. You can also put tape on the cut line, before cutting, to prevent the saw from breaking off small pieces of the material on the top edge of ...


16

Buy a $5 drywall dimpler, the bit will slip off the screw head when the screw is at the appropriate depth.


16

You should replace your blade when its dull. Ways to tell its dull: it starts binding it tears/chips the substance more than usual it burns the wood just a pain to use = a sharp blade should let you push the saw forward with minimum effort. If you find yourself forcing the saw forward (not ideal from a safety perspective), change the blade.


15

Believe it or not, they do make such things. For example the Greenlee AC Adaptor for 18V Cordless Tools. I have not heard of a "system" like that though. I suspect that's related to the fact that I've never met a pro who used or even wanted one. When battery-powered tools finally became usable, we all pledged our firstborns to whatever god made that ...


15

It has to do with how far back the blade goes on the down (non cutting) stroke. It's usually called the "Pendulum Stroke adjustment." The idea being that it will move the blade back, out of the way of the material on the down stroke. It reduces the load on the saw when cutting thick materials, at the cost of a bit more splintering. Use a setting of 0 ...


14

Put the drill in reverse, firmly grip the chuck (the part you were calling the head) and gently squeeze the trigger up the point that you cannot hold on. If you hear clicking, and it doesn't torque very much, you need to turn the torque setting up to the maximum (the highest number, or the drill setting if it has one). If it still doesn't budge and you're ...


13

A typical spindle sander rotates at between 100 and 2,000 RPM, where a router is much faster 8,000 to 35,000 RPM. So I would say this is probably not the best idea, and could lead to damage to the equipment, injury, and death.


12

There's a GREAT article here. I'd highly recommend checking it out. Here's a brief excerpt (ALL CREDIT GOES TO THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR!): Nickle Cadmium (NiCd) Pros: NiCd batteries are more difficult to damage from heat and impact. NiCd batteries have a longer cycle life of about 1,000 charges. They put out strong current flow. They are less easily damaged ...


11

Try this little trick. Cut two rectangles from your plywood an inch or two larger than what you want your finished pieces to be. Be sure one face of these rectangles are a straight factory edge. Now stack the two pieces together and clamp them with the factory edges one on top of the other, nice and flush. Scribe a perfectly square line using a ...


11

I have a hand-tighten chuck on my cordless (a Makita) and I've never had any issues. However most of my bits are spin-resistant (i.e. they have chamfers). I've used it with a step bit to drill 7/8" holes through stainless steel. If that drill has a user-replaceable chuck, you could always just start with the stock one and upgrade if needed...


11

Your hedge trimmer sounds like it has died or is in the process of dying. A quick google search confirms that this can occur with Black & Decker hedge trimmers, although it does not appear to be wide spread. Because you didn't provide the model it isn't possible to give you a more specific reason why it has failed. My opinion is that when you were ...


10

The only gloves I ever use are form fitting "mechanix" type gloves. They are no real protection from a powerful saw or drill, but help with sharp edges etc. As woodchips says, there is no substitute for safe practices and knowing how to use your tools properly.


10

Exterior outlets are normally GFCI protected either at the breaker box or the outlet itself. If you have checked at the box already, check that none of the outlets is a tripped GFCI. If it is, there is a reset button on it.


10

When the drill is used as a screwdriver, the numbers indicate the torque breaking point. Higher numbers mean more torque. By breaking point, I mean the point at which torque is no longer applied. This feature is useful because you can limit the amount of torque that is applied to prevent screws, or the materials they are inserted in, from being stripped. ...


9

For what it's worth I've used a 6" stacked dado set in my small 10" saw for years without any issues. My understanding is that dado blades should always be smaller than the saw's rated blade size due to the increased load of cutting a wide dado over just cutting a saw kerf width. The smaller diameter means your saw will be able to exert more force on the ...


9

I've only used an oscillating tool a few times (it was someone else's ... can't remember the maker, but I don't think it was Fein), and I do own a rotary cutter (RotoZip), and a few Dremel rotary tools, but they're smaller models for hobby work, not construction. The RotoZip is closer in spec to the Dremel Tri Multi-Tool from what I can find (it's on their ...


9

A 60 tooth is a fine blade for semi-smooth finish cuts. Cuts on flooring are always at the wall ends, so even a 40 is good for that since the baseboard trim goes over the cut. You should be leaving a 1/4 inch expansion gap at he ends anyway, so they won't show. The DeWalt 12" blade is a good long lasting blade. It has good balance, heat dissipation and takes ...


9

If you want to rip it (cut it on its long dimension), the only way to be sure it is straight is to use a table saw: If you want to cross cut it (on its short dimension), you can do that with a miter saw if the piece is not too wide: If you are confident in your abilities and it does not need to be exactly straight, you can make a line with a chalk line ...


9

It depends on what you're cutting, why you're cutting it, and what type of cuts you're making. Long Straight Cuts When it comes to long straight cuts, a table saw is the best in the business. Set the fence, turn it on, and it'll cut the same width pieces forever. With a band saw (or most other saws), you'll be looking at using some type of jig for long ...


9

The most likely solution is to create a template and use a router with a bit that follows the template. The router would also be used for easing over any sharp edges. photo credit, sample image, not a product recommendation


8

It's possible that the battery's days are numbered, but I doubt that the whine you're hearing comes from the battery itself. That noise is called "coil whine" and comes from the windings of the transformer(s) inside the charger. An electrical engineer (which I am NOT) could probably explain why you get the noise with one battery and not the other; I can ...


8

A few things I've done/do with my rotary tool that can't be done with a oscillating tool: Etching numbers/letters with a diamond point (in very hard materials; such as marking serial number/ownership on a bicycle frame or tool). Polishing; many rotary attachments are made for polishing fine items. Routing. There are several router bit setups for roto-zips ...


8

Sorry to disagree with KeithS, however there are many companies that rebuild NiCad battery packs. I'm not saying it is a great deal financially, however most common brands can be rebuilt. NiCad packs, for example, are made of several 1.5Vdc cells. the cells themselves are usually pretty uniform in size, however can differ in quality. Putting more in series ...


8

The drill you refer to has a single-ring chuck that is operated with one arm. Its surface is large enough so that you can have reliable grip and apply enough torque to the chuck to tighten/loosen it in all reasonable situations. I've used a similar drill of another brand with the same chuck design - the chuck operation and reliability are just excellent. ...


7

Certainly you will get better with practice. Also, as drywall (plasterboard in the UK) is quite soft you'd have to have the clutch on a low setting anyway. I find that if I don't get the screw at quite the right depth the first go I can usually just add an extra couple of twists by hand to get it bedded in to my satisfaction. Just make sure you get a ...


7

Yeah, that 4" would be a long cut. It could be done in two passes, one from each side. The middle area would have a bit of an overlap and maybe a blade mark, but that could be sanded down. Plus you are probably going to finish it anyways. What I would recommend though is changing the shape of your transition piece to make it easier to cut, and would also ...



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