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19

The most common failure with posts in concrete is "collar rot", where the post rots right at the point where it exits the concrete at the ground line. This can be easily avoided if the concrete is slightly above ground grade and domed or tapered away from the post so water doesn't lay against the wood. Drainage is the key, keep standing water away from the ...


11

This all depends on soil conditions. Loamy soil with good drainage, the concrete is probably OK. Clay soil, the concrete doesn't really do anything short of trapping water against the wood. In both cases, many people suggest not using concrete at all. Instead, dig the hole deeper than the post and then add some gravel to the bottom. Insert the post, then ...


8

Depends on how intact it is. If it is good solid wood, screw a long eye-bolt into it and yank it out / work it out that way If it's all punky, drill some holes down the middle and split it, and remove the pieces.


7

Since you just want to get the fence back up: screw a long board horizontally across the pieces of fence, bridging the broken post. A couple of long 2x4's should do the trick. Skip fixing the post altogether.


7

I would use a punch to make a small dent in the pole so my drill bit wouldn't slip.


6

I would use something like a MetPost repair spur. You drive it into the bottom of the old post and then fix the new post to it.


6

You may find it easier to use a drill with an extension or extra long bit attached so you can do most of the hard work without too much leaning over. Punch a bunch of holes in each side, and then attack the little bit left with a saw.


5

A chisel-point digging bar might help. Depending on what type you get, you may even be able to sharpen it with an angle grinder for an axe-like end. Just be prepared for a workout!


5

The punch suggested by SpectralGhost is a good idea. If that doesn't work, you can make a jig with three pieces of 2x4. Screw the pieces together and drill a pilot hole for the drill bit (the dotted line) using the same size bit you intend to use on the pipe.


4

I'm going through the same thing with a similar fence in a similar setting. There appear to be three options: Attempt to repair the existing posts. Pros: straightforward. Cons: expensive and you risk having to redo everything within a short time when another part of the posts rots out. Could be ugly looking, too. Yank the broken posts and replace them. ...


4

How tall are your posts to start with? A 6 foot above ground post should have at least 2 feet in the ground in your area. I would be setting them in concrete so you have a good solid base and good ballast. A metal post in concrete won't rust as long as you dome the top of the concrete so water runs away from the post. I'll share a clever trick that ...


3

Concerete around a fence post is to help with lateral stability. It's not being used as a footer, since there isn't a whole lot of weight involved with a fence post. As such, there's no need for concrete to be below the bottom of the post...in fact, you like don't want that, as you want any water that gets between the concrete and wood to have a place to ...


3

Automobile floor jack and a jackstand. Place on both sides of broken pole. Straddle from jackstand to jack with two 2' x 6's screwed together. Wrap chain around 2x6 and using a cordless drill, screw lag bolts through chain into broke off fence post. Raise jackstand to keep level with jack. lift with jack, stop and raise jackstand to equal height. 2-3 rounds ...


3

Pea gravel for the base of the hole makes sense...for drainage. On the sides, less so. I'd opt for crushed rock which will compact better when tamping. If tamped properly, you likely don't even need concrete.


2

If you have a vehicle winch/come along/high lift jack you can use it to pull the post out. Beats wiggling the post back and forth all day. I dug some post holes in very hard soil with a steel bar and a shop vac. I chipped away at the soil and vacumed out the loose dirt. I went down 4 feet in a very short time. Maybe you can do something similar around the ...


2

They make a metal brack to span the old 2X4 and you most likely can get it to work for the new roof. If not I can most likely get some made at work. You do have some good bracing and support on the one footing you have pictured here and if the other one is the same way it would be just as strong. I would just pull out the old footings and replace them ...


2

Another option: Get two steel angles, pound them in at opposite corners beside the stub, and lash the upper part to them with wire. They shouldn't be that hard to scavenge.


2

STOP!!!! The correct way to prevent rot coming up the post is to set the tube, pour a little bit of concrete to the bottom, lift the tube a few inches allowing the concrete to "mushroom" out around the bottom of the tube, then set the post and pour the rest of your concrete. Do not allow the post to go through the bottom of the concrete. Water will wick up ...


2

In terms of structure, sure. However it will be ugly, unless you are a very good welder, and take a lot of care dressing it after. Remember too that most fence pipe is galvanized. The fumes given off when you heat it are quite poisonous. It may be a better idea to just buy chunks of pipe with an inside diameter that can slide over the existing post, or ...


2

Hi I had the same issue and some similar thoughts. I tried the drilling out process with and extended drill spade bit, But could not drill all of the post out. In the end I was able to remove all of the remainder by driving a stainless steel tube down the hole cutting the rotten post out a chunk at a time. Then sliding another smaller tube down the middle of ...


2

I just went through the process of removing a broken-off fence post without removing the concrete pier. Tough job! I expected it would only take a couple of hours, and that replacing just the post would be easier than digging out and breaking out the old pier, disposing of the concrete, and pouring a new pier. Maybe not, though, especially if the old post ...


2

I had the same situation at my place, I set the post and ran the top rail past it to the house and set elbows to make a hoop to carry the chain link past the post. I did not want to screw anything to the house so I rebent wall brackets to clamp the top and bottom rails to the line post


1

These bracket will not work for a railing. These are for posts of a roof or pergola. They do make brackets like this for railing posts but they are much more heavy duty and expensive. Over $40 a piece and you will probably have to add blocking to properly lag them into place. The picture looks to be an aluminum post but at my homedepot they ones where a ...


1

Railing post should have been a prerequisite thought in the process of building any deck. As far as attaching to Aztec or trex product decking it is not sufficiently structural to withstand lateral forces needed for adequate attachment. Which is why you can't find any attachment method, as it isn't recommended. Sounds like you made your own decision on ...


1

You can't escape physics and violate code, which places footing depths below frost depths. Just be glad you're not in Alberta, I hear they must go to 12ft. Where restraint in the form of a building load is present, heaving pressures may or may not overcome the restraint, but they can be very high: 19 tons/sq ft has been measured, and a seven-story ...


1

The main con is that since its designed to be driven down, the tapered tip will offer less torque, even set in concrete, than a post set to a similar depth. Another consideration is frost heaving. The bare adapter should not heave, but the combined concrete/adapter might, unless the pour goes below the frost line. This can be mitigated with SONOtubes use. ...


1

It looks like there used to be a brick wall there and then at some point the above-ground portion was replaced with the wood fence. Breaking up the concrete is the best way to go, since you have already dug down to the bottom a breaker bar and sledge hammer would make short work of it. Another option is to put a 4x4 treated post right along the wall to one ...


1

I would break up the concrete and redo. It'll be a lot easier to take out of the hole in chunks, or re-use as backfill.


1

When I did this I painted the bottom of the 4x4 with tar. I forget the exact product name right now, hardware store helped select it, but it was black and sticky and sealed the wood. Also we used pressure treated. Is that your plan, too?



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