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18

2000 gals is a lot for a couple of 1" tabs to chlorinate. I put one to two tablets into a 350-gallon hot tub and sometimes even that isn't enough to maintain proper chlorination. I'd be looking at one to two 3" tablets for pretty much anything you'd call a "pool". The short answer to your question is, yes, you want to put a "start-up" dose of chlorinating ...


11

In my experience, most horror stories of pool maintenance are usually the result of neglect, or not paying attention to the instructions. It's not that hard, but expect to spend an average of 10-15min per day checking on your pool, adding chlorine, clearing out leaves in the skimmer, etc. Also, once a week, expect to spend some extra time ...


10

Still chlorinated, but if handling chemicals is the issue, how about a salt water pool? The alternative I've seen pushed is copper-oxygen system. I can't say how effective it is, but last I checked it is not approved by the EPA for sanitizing water. I've also read that they take more attention and care. Just based on experience having a pool in full ...


9

I'm not clear on how some milk jugs are going to heat the pool. Most of the light will have scattered before it reaches the submerged jugs. Plus the surface area is going to be minuscule compared to the pool area, unless you have thousands of jugs. Finally, I thought one of the main benefits to a pool cover was to reduce evaporative heat loss. Underwater ...


8

I never knew that pool rebar was grounded or bonded, so I did a search and found what looks to be a pretty good article on the subject: http://www.poolspanews.com/2009/051/051grid.html The lights in the pool may be 12V, but you've certainly got a transformer for those lights, a pump, and possibly other stuff in the pool area that is at line voltage, and ...


8

There are many different solutions depending on how much you'd want to spend, how much DIY you want to do, and what exactly you are trying to achieve. I would not try to directly switch this load: inductive loads generate voltage spikes when switching them, which can damage electronics and such that are not designed to handle it. They also have high in-rush ...


7

I believe the pressure loss depends on the flow rate. There will be some loss of pressure. To avoid it you need 2" copper pipe or multiple parallel 1/2" pipes (probably more than 16).


6

To repair cool deck flaking (not cracks in concrete): Step One: All of the flaking or cracked texture needs to be removed. This is accomplished by using a scraper in conjunction with a high pressure washer. If the flaking is excessive and severe it may not be necessary to use the pressure washer. Bottom line is the old patch needs to be removed to expose ...


6

If you do not have trees or other things that put debris in the pool, it is not necessary to run the pump all the time. You can install a timer on the electric line to the pool pump and set it to run less. This will save on your electric costs and increase the life of the pump. The amount of time you have to run it a day depends on the conditions.


6

Your iron fence, like this: ... Is the more traditional choice. A fence like this is going to be very durable, generally only requiring a coat of oil paint every few years and replacing minor touches like the caps on the posts. These are also generally more aesthetically pleasing as they are typically installed as part of the overall decor of the pool. ...


6

In general the point is to filter your water. If you want to be sure about it, check the volume of your pool, and the flow rate of your pump. Run it long enough to go through that much volume 1-2 times a day. In practice, that's probably around 6-8 hours. Make sure your chemistry is good, and then try it. If it looks nice for a few weeks, try lowering ...


5

This is the link you need: http://thepoolcalculator.com/ It describes basic chemistry, and has a calculator you can specialize for your pool. I personally maintained my pool with bleach, borax, baking soda, and stabilizer for years. This is the cheapest way to go, but it's a significant time commitment. Any pool supply store can help you get started, ...


5

I removed our pool cause the maintenance just wasn't worth it - especially when the liner died and I learned it would take about a grand to replace it, but this is what I do remember. Any local swimming pool supply store will sell testing kits and the necessary chemicals. They will also be able to tell you what chemicals are used depending on the results ...


5

This is a popular way of remotely controlling a dust collection vacuum in a wood workshop. Sounds like what you are looking for.


5

As others have said milk jugs are too small and much of your heat loss is due to evaporation. An alternative would be to build these "lily-pad-pool-warmers". They are basically hoola hoops with black plastic sheeting stretched across them. You make a bunch of them and then float them on the pool. How much good they do will depend on how much of the ...


4

I have a bit of paranoia when it comes to electricity (took a few volts when I thought something WAS grounded but wasn't) so when it comes to things like that I always play it safe. If it's not going to cost you a ton of money, I'd do it just for safety sake. The lights may only be 12 volt but you never know in the future what you'd want to put around the ...


4

Is there something wrong a standard Propane Pool Heater? http://search.intheswim.com/?q=propane%20pool%20heater Some of the gas heaters linked above also have sizing guides and model info that can help you pick a heater large enough for your pool. Keep in mind that even with gas heat it usually takes 24h to warm the pool, so you don't turn on the heat and ...


4

I don't think you'd want to use salt for a couple of reasons: if you have any rebar in there, salt will increase corrosion salt will affect the concrete mix, possibly badly affecting strength Instead, use one of the polymer grip additives designed for this purpose - they can be very cheap, and some are transparent so do not affect the appearance of the ...


4

The first issue you need to address is why is the base eroding in the same place time after time? The large majority of above ground pools survive many years with a leveled sand base. The probable reasons for your erosion problem is an unstable base, misguided water runoff or the base is a bit too high in relationship to the surrounding area allowing runoff ...


4

If you can't add parallel paths through the heater as @redgrittybrick suggests, add a bypass with 2" pipe and a throttling valve. The valve will let you balance overall flow vs heat gain. The bypass arrangement will lessen the strain on your pump seals and motor.


4

I have a feeling your design looks like this: You should do this instead: If you make 16 parallel copper circuits, that would have an equivalent cross-section or a 2 inch pipe. However, I would probably do more like 20 circuits because all of those bends are going to introduce additional pumping/pressure losses and the extra circuits will make up for ...


4

Let us start with some basics of how the pool plumbing works. This picture helps to show the basic connectivity of a typical swimming pool system. (Picture borrowed from website) Note that not all pool setups have two separate pipes to draw water from the skimmer or main drain and bring it up to the to the pump station as shown above. On some the main ...


3

Very late in answering here, but solar pool heating systems are great and pay themselves off in 1-1.5 years vs. propane and electric heaters. They are -- by a large margin -- the most cost-efficient renewable energy application that I know of. Edit: After reading your question again, I see that you said solar pool heating requires a pool cover. It does ...


3

Use gravity, all you need is a garden hose! If the pool is raised up on a deck or above surrounding areas, then you can siphon it out. This is exactly the same way fish tank owners get water out of their tanks. First get a garden hose that is long enough to end up in an area lower than the desired depth. Put the hose completely in the pool so it fills with ...


3

You could but you need to build all sorts of hidden supports underneath. In theory a thick polycarbonate (perspex/plexiglass/lexan) sheet could easily support the weight but you would have a job anchoring it so it couldn't tip over or tilt and flood. And there would be a big risk if somebody managed to slide under it and get trapped.


3

I think the point to the question was to build a soundproof box more than buy a new motor, although good suggestions for power and such. From some research on similar topic and some personal experience I have discovered that looking at the mounting of your motors is very important. Sometimes placing a rubber or similar vibration absorbent material between ...


3

When I first read this, my first instinct was "don't", and I think that still holds. You are mixing water, electricity and possibly natural gas in a single untested design, and if anything goes wrong your pool could drain out, you could get electrocuted going in the water, or you could even end up with a bomb. It's not worth whatever costs you'd save ...


3

Per request, I'll expand my comment into an answer: as for the joints in the concrete, I'd use polymeric sand (typically used for locking pavers). Then the key is to create some sort of smooth pad in between the concrete and the bottom of the pool. Some options: roofing felt (tar paper). Ice and Shield roofing membrane rubber pond liner epoxy (if it's ...


3

I have this exact same problem. The only option I have found is to use a chemical additive to precipitate out the the iron and then do lots of filter cartridge changes. Luckily, the cartridges don't seem to be deteriorated by the orange stuff, and you can just swap two of them every 12 hours and wash them off with the garden hose. If you have a full size ...



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