Hot answers tagged

33

PV panels are ~15% efficient. Hot water panels are much more, and probably much cheaper. Way more efficient to just heat the water, rather than convert to electric and then to heat. Maybe with the exception of a heat pump... $$$


18

2000 gals is a lot for a couple of 1" tabs to chlorinate. I put one to two tablets into a 350-gallon hot tub and sometimes even that isn't enough to maintain proper chlorination. I'd be looking at one to two 3" tablets for pretty much anything you'd call a "pool". The short answer to your question is, yes, you want to put a "start-up" dose of chlorinating ...


12

Still chlorinated, but if handling chemicals is the issue, how about a salt water pool? The alternative I've seen pushed is copper-oxygen system. I can't say how effective it is, but last I checked it is not approved by the EPA for sanitizing water. I've also read that they take more attention and care. Just based on experience having a pool in full ...


12

In my experience, most horror stories of pool maintenance are usually the result of neglect, or not paying attention to the instructions. It's not that hard, but expect to spend an average of 10-15min per day checking on your pool, adding chlorine, clearing out leaves in the skimmer, etc. Also, once a week, expect to spend some extra time brushing/...


12

This has already been said in one answer - but I want to say it again so that it is very clear. Generating electricity from solar only to then turn around and run electric heaters for the pool is not an efficient way to go at all. Overall such system will likely be less than 10% efficient in terms of solar energy conversion. Go with a solar water heater ...


9

I never knew that pool rebar was grounded or bonded, so I did a search and found what looks to be a pretty good article on the subject: http://www.poolspanews.com/2009/051/051grid.html The lights in the pool may be 12V, but you've certainly got a transformer for those lights, a pump, and possibly other stuff in the pool area that is at line voltage, and ...


9

There are many different solutions depending on how much you'd want to spend, how much DIY you want to do, and what exactly you are trying to achieve. I would not try to directly switch this load: inductive loads generate voltage spikes when switching them, which can damage electronics and such that are not designed to handle it. They also have high in-rush ...


9

I'm not clear on how some milk jugs are going to heat the pool. Most of the light will have scattered before it reaches the submerged jugs. Plus the surface area is going to be minuscule compared to the pool area, unless you have thousands of jugs. Finally, I thought one of the main benefits to a pool cover was to reduce evaporative heat loss. Underwater ...


9

As others have said milk jugs are too small and much of your heat loss is due to evaporation. An alternative would be to build these "lily-pad-pool-warmers". They are basically hoola hoops with black plastic sheeting stretched across them. You make a bunch of them and then float them on the pool. How much good they do will depend on how much of the ...


9

How much energy do you need? In four months you spend $7500, so assuming you heat using natural gas, that would indicate a consumption of about 19,000 cubic meters. At 10.8 kWh per cubic meter, we're talking 200,000 kWh; in four months that's an average power requirement of 70 kW. Can the Sun help? Reasonable solar output in New York is around 5 kWh/m2 ...


8

When I was a kid, my much older brother heated the pool in his backyard by running a bunch of black painted pvc pipe to and fro on the fence, and then plumbed it into the filter system.


8

Salt pool and baquasil are your two best options. (although technically salt is chlorine) Remember, you're trying to kill all living things in the pool. "no chemicals" and "no living things" tend to be mutually exclusive.


8

You have a pretty big pool by residential standards but I still am surprised it is costing you that much... almost $2k per month! Assuming a price of $.90 / therm (average in the NY area, according to some random site I found) and the numbers on this US Energy Star page, that's more than double what you should be spending for a 1800sf pool in New York. ...


7

I believe the pressure loss depends on the flow rate. There will be some loss of pressure. To avoid it you need 2" copper pipe or multiple parallel 1/2" pipes (probably more than 16).


7

From my personal and professional experience with Saltwater Pools with "Salt Chlorine Generators" on them has always been positive. I will bullet point some information to help you ensure it's a positive experience: Correct Installation: The Salt Chlorinator Systems have 2 main parts. A "Salt Chlorine Generator Cell" that is spliced into the return side ...


7

I would expect more water to flow unless you have extremely low water pressure. You have a 3/4" line and all the water pressure of either a municipal water system or a water pump. Splitting that into two lines will not likely double the flow rate as there is a pressure drop, but it should increase the total flow rate considerably. I would expect it to almost ...


7

O-Rings are (or should be) cheap - if they are not, try to establish exactly what size they are and shop around; you should be able to find them for a pretty low cost, and replacing them is the right approach, even for "one more year." While you can try to get a little more life out of them by greasing them up with a pretty stiff silicone grease (typically ...


6

To repair cool deck flaking (not cracks in concrete): Step One: All of the flaking or cracked texture needs to be removed. This is accomplished by using a scraper in conjunction with a high pressure washer. If the flaking is excessive and severe it may not be necessary to use the pressure washer. Bottom line is the old patch needs to be removed to expose ...


6

YES YES YES... All metal parts should be grounded and bonded together.(to eliminate and voltage differential between separate metal parts) Just do it so you won't have "what if" thoughts every time you look at the ungrounded parts.


6

If you do not have trees or other things that put debris in the pool, it is not necessary to run the pump all the time. You can install a timer on the electric line to the pool pump and set it to run less. This will save on your electric costs and increase the life of the pump. The amount of time you have to run it a day depends on the conditions.


6

Your iron fence, like this: ... Is the more traditional choice. A fence like this is going to be very durable, generally only requiring a coat of oil paint every few years and replacing minor touches like the caps on the posts. These are also generally more aesthetically pleasing as they are typically installed as part of the overall decor of the pool. ...


6

In general the point is to filter your water. If you want to be sure about it, check the volume of your pool, and the flow rate of your pump. Run it long enough to go through that much volume 1-2 times a day. In practice, that's probably around 6-8 hours. Make sure your chemistry is good, and then try it. If it looks nice for a few weeks, try lowering ...


6

A drop of 24 inches in the water level is a definite indication that your plumbing or the pool shell is compromised. First step is to notice if the water level continues to drop while the pump is off. If it does continue to drop the leak is most likely in the pool shell or the suction side of the pump. If it is on the suction line you should see evidence ...


6

The contractor should have busted up the top of the pool sides and cracked the concrete basically everywhere else. I have filled a few pools. We jackhammer the crap out of everything. There are holes punched every foot or two everywhere. You then totally chop off the first couple feet on the sides - especially on the downslope side to allow drainage. ...


5

I removed our pool cause the maintenance just wasn't worth it - especially when the liner died and I learned it would take about a grand to replace it, but this is what I do remember. Any local swimming pool supply store will sell testing kits and the necessary chemicals. They will also be able to tell you what chemicals are used depending on the results ...


5

This is the link you need: http://thepoolcalculator.com/ It describes basic chemistry, and has a calculator you can specialize for your pool. I personally maintained my pool with bleach, borax, baking soda, and stabilizer for years. This is the cheapest way to go, but it's a significant time commitment. Any pool supply store can help you get started, ...


5

I'm not totally sure about salt water, but I don't think it poses any special problem. I would give the threads 2 or 3 wraps, then also coat the female threads with pipe joint cement, not plumber's putty. Save the plumber's putty for drains and escutcheons.


5

This is a popular way of remotely controlling a dust collection vacuum in a wood workshop. Sounds like what you are looking for.



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