Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In addition to the excellent advice above, for soft woods like pine it is often necessary to raise the grain before applying a finish for smoothest results. Sand smooth and using a tack cloth to remove the dust lightly spray the surface with a little water from a spray bottle, and/or wipe the surface with a damp cloth. Don't soak the surface, just damp. ...


2

The first coat of finish will raise the grain of the wood, so you need to sand it down with some sandpaper (220 grit or so) before you put on the next coat. This is mentioned in the directions.


2

First of all, I'm assuming you already sanded the surface smooth enough before you started. If you put polyurethane on a rough surface you will get a rough finish. Second, as @keshlam says, make sure there is no dust at all on the surface before you apply the finish. A slightly damp cloth can help pick up anything remaining (but make sure the wood is dry ...


3

I've used the steel wool + vinegar method before*. It's essentially a stain so really only affects the surface layer. It shouldn't have any meaningful affect on the strength of the piece of wood. Splitting and warping is related to moisture and drying so wouldn't really be affecting by weathering stain. After you weather it, note that most any additional ...


3

Interesting question... I'd never think to use scotchgard. It might work, but if it doesnt, any finish you try to apply on top will not stick. Maybe try this in a hidden area to see if it provides protection. Tung oil can be a mixed bag - there's a difference between the pure stuff, the tung oil + driers, and the tung oil "finishes." So if you buy the ...


2

Top, then bottom, then top, then bottom will greatly reduce the odds of the board warping due to differential moisture uptake/release when one surface is sealed and the other is open to the air. While the acrylic paint is sealing it somewhat, the conventional wisdom of long experience is to try and keep the number of coats per side the same to prevent (or at ...


5

Doesn't make any difference, really; the question is number of coats per surface, not order they're applied in. The thing to watch out for is that there will be a tendency for drips to run down the edges and onto the other face. You may want to use masking tape or other techniques to guard against that, though going with multiple thin coats rather than ...


1

If you're feeling adventurous you could try spraying on a tinted top coat, that way you could achieve the ebony(ish) color and preserve the grain pattern. Its a tricky technique and it must be sprayed but it can be done. There are a few variations but in general you add 10-20% dye stain to a finish like urethane or lacquer and spray on enough coats to get ...


0

Seeing how it isn't real wood, rather just a thin laminate on top of MDF, I wouldn't bother trying to stain it and instead would just paint it. Painting it shouldn't be any different than painting anything else really - lightly sand, prime and paint! Depending on the color and type of paint, you might need two or more coats. If you haven't yet assembled ...


0

Okay first: don't use PolyShades for anything...ever. Its the worst. Second: Stripper is great except when its not. Sometimes certain strippers react to certain finishes in a way that is...undesirable. Then you have a mess. I've been doing this longer than I care to remember and I still have weird results now and again. No rhyme or reason. CitriStip gel is ...


0

Is it a standard poly or waterborne? You could use the appropriate solvent to remove it...though if it is a traditional poly it will likely settle a lot during the drying process which will make it look better. And if you are applying multiple coats (I always suggest at least two with any type of Poly) you can sand it smooth once it dries, clean it, and ...


3

It's all about adhesion. When you recoat after 2 hours you get a chemical bond between layers. If you let it go longer than that, you need to wait 24 hours so it's hard enough to sand and get a mechanical bond. I sand before the final layer. That gets it smooth without danger of sanding through.


2

I see the pros use a large applicator, specific for floor finishing, looking a lot like a household mop. Not the old stringy style, but a sponge mop, theirs having a cotton pad instead of sponge. This way you can cover a lot of area. If any of the doors have the flooring running across the door rather than running through it, cut along one of the joints in ...



Top 50 recent answers are included