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i think the easiest way to do what you want is twofold. first, apply the coating with a spray gun, second, change to a lacquer clearcoat. this is pretty standard for all furniture and casework. lacquer goes on really thin and dries really fast. then sand it with 400 grit. reapply as necessary and repeat until you get the build thickness you desire. ...


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Preventing runs is as easy as following one simple approach: Start heavy, finish light. What that means is that you immerse your brush to maybe inch of depth, scrape off one side on the can, and apply the remaining product load to the project in a new area adjacent to the previous work. The idea of "starting heavy" is that you apply enough product to ...


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Finishing a floor one room at a time is not a recommended practice. It takes several days, if not weeks for the polyurethane to completely cure. During that time, the poly will be off-gassing toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to VOCs has been linked to many illnesses, and should be limited as much as possible. The VOCs will mostly dissipate ...


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There is a product designed for decoupage projects called Mod Podge that is sold at many arts and crafts stores which will seal the paper, and protect it. However it would not be durable enough to just use that, so it would have to be sealed with an additional layer of either polyurethane, shellac, or lacquer. Practice applying the products on some scrap ...


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Generally, yes - you can help protect the wallpaper with polyurethane. However, once the paper is on, it's not coming off without a complete overhaul (sand it all off and redo it), and you should be aware that paper tends to fade and yellow after a while. Also, if you use a brush to apply water based poly then you need to apply it kind of quickly and be (...



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