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9

A picture being worth 1000 words, This is a pocket door:


7

A pocket door is a door that slides into the wall as opposed to opening in or out as a regular door would. A good comparison would be the sliding doors as most mega-marts or large stores that slide open when you walk towards them or if you're a fan of "Star Trek: The Next Generation". The doors throughout the ship are "pocket doors" (except our pocket doors ...


6

I'm currently installing a pocket door. It's a full 1.75" exterior door thickness, flush door that weighs 120 lbs (plywood facing and oak rails and stiles and oak edging.) I built the door myself (cost me 10% against the cheapest bid I got for the door.) I am using Johnson 200 series rollers and I-beam for the door. It rolls VERY easy. Easy enough to break ...


4

My expectation when opening a door (either hinged or pocket) is that the switch is inside on the strike side of the door. Strike side location would avoid the pocket door completely. You are asking for trouble by routing the cable so near the surface. If you are trying to use NM cable, you would have to armor the cable the whole way up, because its not ...


4

The thing that makes an object on motion go fast or slow is friction (or lack thereof). You need more friction. The challenge is to introduce a little friction that will not interfere with the doors operation or mark up the visible portions of the door. While I could envision a system of roller tensioning adjustment in a pocket door, I am not aware that ...


3

Pocket doors can usually be adjusted by turning/twisting an adjustment screw at the top (sometimes a wheel at the bottom depending on the door). The door should allow for this adjustment somewhere without removing anything.


3

I don't think it's likely to meet building code requirements in the US, if you care about that. In particular, I would be concerned about both its fire resistance when closed, and the ease (or lack thereof) of opening it during an emergency situation. If you're concerned about clearance and hence don't want a door that will swing into either adjacent room, ...


3

One thing that comes to mind is that the pocket would not be very well insulated and so you might have heating/cooling issues with that wall (depending on how the conservatory is used).


2

Regarding your question on tools to remove the track, this article (Natural Handyman - How To Repair and Adjust Pocket Doors) says: Many pocket doors can be adjusted with special tools from around the top of the pocket frame with the door in a partially closed position. These tools are often specially angled wrenches designed to fit into that ...


2

I had the same problem, and was able to resolve the problem by counter-bending the door. You can try it in the frame, or you can remove the door and use some wood you might have laying around. If you do it in the frame, you won't be able to operate the door while you're working on it, and it will probably take a few days. But the idea is to stick some wood ...


2

There are a number of pocket door appraches. Usually is makes sense to buy a frame kit such as this one There are many grades and sizes, some of which are meant for heavy doors. You do need to make sure that the thickness of your doors do not exceed the limits of the kits. If they do, you may be able to buy parts and create your own combination that will ...


2

The 'boxes' made for pocket doors are designed to act as the framing for your wall material (typically sheetrock). You topically can't frame out the pocket door pocket with full studs as that'd make the wall too thick.


2

Perhaps cable clips like these. I would drill a hole through the base and install them with metal screws into the edge of the stud, then insert the cable. The hole into the metal edge of the stud should be pre-drilled. If they fit, I would use several to ensure that the cable did not stray into the door channel. There are also cable clips that use zip ...


1

I have to use at least 30 characters to suggest: zip-ties.


1

Take a look at latch on web page http://www.johnsonhardware.com/1521.htm , when the doors are closed they latch together with out locking.


1

I would be tempted to retrofit some soft close hardware to the door. This would keep the door easy to move but would slow down the last bit of motion. It will certainly require some work that will be difficult now that the door is installed but would give you a nice high end feel and save fingers.


1

My guess is you have ball bearing hangers on the doors, if you want to slow the door down, you could change one of the hangers to a standard none ball bearing hanger.


1

You should consider that pocket doors rattle, if air pressure changes due to window or HVAC.


1

This is very Easy to do! _Click photo for full size I will show you a method that took me less than 2 hours to fix and I did not remove my Pocket Door. As for I can not because I built it in using Bullnose Corner Bead. Very Smooth look but can be very difficult down the road when it comes to changing out the hardware or replacing the door in general. The ...


1

I've never seen a pocket door in an exterior wall, but there are the "barn door" style sliding doors that might be able to be used, if you don't mind the fact that you wall they slide against can't have things hung on it, and there's exposed hardware. I have no idea how well they'd seal (and that may not be an issue, as yours sounds to be a former external ...


1

SDS London sells them.



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