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1

Japanese saws like yours often have very thin blades which are not very rigid. Therefore, they don't respond well to the torque that's required to correct a cut that's going astray. Using a more rigid saw would be better for straight cuts. Another idea: in some Japanese saws, the teeth are offset to one side only. You could use one of these with a metal ...


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Are you using the wrong saw? Yes. I have no idea what yours is for; felling trees? After practicing with that, these should be a cinch: Carpenter's Cross Cut Hand Saw:


1

I'd suggest that you get angled metal L-brackets. Clamp these on both sides of your cut line such that the saw blade fits between them. This will keep the cut to a tight line. The closer the clamps the cleaner the cut, but also the more wear on your saw, potentially. Widening the clamps will allow more stray in your cut (deal with that with planing and ...


4

I've never used a Japanese-style saw, but have always found it easier to keep a long cut straight with the rigid blade of a tenon saw than with a carpenter's saw. Held at a fairly shallow angle, a tenon saw can make an indefinitely long cut in material up to about 12mm thick. Then finish with a jack plane with a very sharp blade set shallow.


3

Cutting shallower (with the handle closer to the work) will encourage the saw to cut a straight line. Cutting steeper (with the handle up high) gives you more maneuverability. Start the cut being careful to keep the blade in line with the cut. As you cut deeper, lower the handle to about 30 degrees. The blade will want to keep cutting in the same straight ...


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I have a large t-square designed for doing drywall work, but it's great for many other things. I think the long side is about 4-5 ft long. Use that as a guide. It's great not just for cutting, but for layout as well. Something like this


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I have found that the stiffer the saw blade, the more accurate it is at long push/pull cuts. You are probably getting a lot of bend when you push the saw back into the plywood. My two sided saw is somewhat flimsy and so I found the following process really helps. Cut only on the pull Slide the blade back in, do not cut. Cut again on the pull It is ...


4

First off be aware of a couple of important points. In the old days before there ever was electricity and power tools craftspersons could build amazing things out of wood with hand tools along. Woodworking, similar to any other craft, takes patience and practice. Plywood material such as you are proposing to work with is a modern thing invented in the age ...


0

best way to accurately cut a rectangle or square from a plywood sheet with underpowered hand tools I would say the best way is to use power tools. At the bare minimum use a guide - clamp 2 straight boards on either side of the cut with a gap just wide enough for the saw. Aluminum angle works well - it's straight, hard enough that the saw won't wander ...


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You can add plywood, but I would use deck mud to level those large areas. Since you'll be applying ditra you don't need to feather anything. You're just needing a "fairly level" surface under the ditra and on top of it. Self-level is brittle and expensive.


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Pro: cheap, and nothing prevents you from putting a real surface on if you find the look does not really appeal after a while. Cons: Potential for nasty splinters; plywood splinters are miserable. Relatively loud (both to walk on, and acting as a reflector of sound - also loud to the level below if there is living space there).


3

Remove the entire shower door and frame and scrub door opening tile and door/frame assembly completely clean and let dry. Re-install shower door properly and completely seal all areas where frame and tile meet with high-grade silicone caulk. Most swinging shower doors are supposed to have a vinyl flap at the bottom to prevent water spray from escaping under ...


2

If you are interested in the science behind your question, the answer lies hidden in your question. You mentioned "is the extra 1/4 inch really needed". As do most people, you translated this in your mind to "I know how little stiffness there is in a wimpy piece of 1/4 inch plywood, so how could it really make any difference". The stiffness of a piece ...



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