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14

I think the best method is to use an anti slip tape / strip / paint Tape Strip Paint They are ordered form easiest to hardest. The strips will be the easiest because you just stick them on. You will obviously stick them on the length where your tires will be going and not sideways (because that would be pointless). The strips are more durable, but ...


12

ApplePly is a brand name for an all-hardwood veneer plywood that is higher quality than your typical construction or cheap hardwood plywoods. (You may want to confirm that your "applewood" plywood is truly ApplePly). ApplePly should be similar in quality to baltic birch plywoods and like baltic birch it is not supposed to contain voids. You can find these ...


10

The same policy goes for roof sheathing as for hanging drywall, you get more strength by spanning more rafters/joists/studs and offsetting the joints. This solves two points of weakness. The main one is the structure turning into a parallelogram where the studs are no longer perpendicular to the ground. When you think of using a diagonal brace to support a ...


10

Twofold theory: Perhaps OSB is cheaper at the moment for this builder than ply and wants to use OSB as much as they can. OSB and Ply are apparently seen as the same in terms of performance and code see: http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publications/by-title/choosing-between-oriented-strandboard-and-plywood/ However, OSB, when cut, is more susceptible to water ...


10

It could be that they are trying to slow down a fire from spreading. The material at the edges might be more fire resistant, so the fire will spread to adjacent buildings more slowly, allowing the occupants more time to escape. You might be able to verify this by checking the local fire codes for conjoined (not sure this is the right term) buildings. See ...


10

Plywood absorbs water and is not a sealing material, period. You can use it as base for ruberoid roof, but not as the layer exposed to the rain. When exposed to rain, wind and sun plywood will cycle through absorbing water and drying out and this will wear out the most outer layer in no time so that it cracks and the damage then proceeds to the next layer ...


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


8

Enter The Sagulator - it's a free online calculator for sag of shelves which is a wonderful tool exactly for these questions. Running your 2 shelf sizes, the larger shelf span (122 CM) won't hold more than about 2 KG overall without noticeably sagging. The shorter shelf (61 CM) can hold about 10 KG overall. As you can see, 10 MM plywood isn't that stiff ...


7

Dove tail joints are not a good option for any type of furniture that you would later hope to take back apart. Dove tails are designed to make a strong and attractive joint that is meant to be permanent. For advice on how to create effective joints that are straight forward to put together and take apart take a study of the techniques used by kit furniture ...


6

How much the shelves will sag depends not only on the materials you use, but also whether or not the shelves are fixed, whether there's a hardwood strip along the length, and how they are attached. The magic number to watch out for is 1/32" (about 0.8 mm) of sag per foot. MDF is incredibly heavy - your bookshelves will weigh a ton if you construct them ...


6

Start by clearing out any loose particles that are still clinging to the wall. Once you've got it cleaned up, wood filler will take care of the missing plywood patch. Apply it with a putty knife and sand it smooth after it dries. It will be easiest if you use a putty/taping knife wider than the patch you're repairing. Otherwise, you'll have to do a little ...


5

Personally, I hate OSB for anything but temporary uses. It's not as strong as ply, it's more suceptible to moisture than ply, more easily damaged than ply. They use it for things like roofs and such cause it's cheap. They are counting on the roof being covered before any extended exposure to moisture, and they certainly don't expect constant foot traffic on ...


5

There are a number of methods to apply large decals and stickers to surfaces while avoiding bubbles and wrinkles. Most professionals prefer a wet method. Clean the surface first. Then coat the surface, or the adhesive side of the sticker, or both, with slightly soapy water. Then lay it down slowly and use a squeegee while laying it down. The soapy water ...


4

First concideration, I would encourage you to use a T&G roof sheathing such as AdvanTec instead of standard CDX plywood. This will give you a better fit and not have to worry about spacing gaps in the plywood. The price is comparable, so there is no cost advantage to using regular plywood. The sheathing should be secured with 6d galv ring shank nails ...


4

If it is MDF or HDF (as opposed to particleboard) then I would choose the fiberboard over ply. Any surface wear will impact the finish laminate, regardless of the underlying material. By contrast, MDF/HDF should be more impact resistance, water/mold resistant and uniform in density and composition. MDF above: more uniform and dense. Particle below, less ...


4

I would use MDF. It is uniform, takes paint well and doesn't warp. It also routes well. It should hold the weight I'd expect in a bookshelf (supported at both sides, about 30" wide and no deeper than 18") If you're really concerned with the sagging you might add a single center support bracket.


4

Laminating a second layer of the same product should stiffen it substantially. Once the first layer is positioned the way you want, spread several beads of construction adhesive across the face of it and conform a second layer over the first. Tack in place with brads using a nailgun to hold it in place until the adhesive sets. Note: These flexible plywoods ...


3

Would like to put in a suggestion for either Schluter Ditra or Laticrete Strata-mat. As uncoupling membranes, they effectively stiffen floors by unitizing the tile layer. For stone installation, Schluter recommends double layer of underlayment. The second layer should be offset from the first layer, not following seams. The second layer should only be ...


3

I would select the product based on the appearance and durability of the finish laminate alone, with little concern for the substrate material, assuming the substrate is some viable material and not pressed paper pulp or something else obviously inferior. For identical finish laminates, MDF would be preferable to plywood as it is denser and more ...


3

The short answer is that you can't. Plywood is heavy and you will need to drive a lot of screws through the wood and drywall into studs to properly secure it. You will also find that when you have something sandwiched tightly against paint, often it will pull the paint off when you remove it. That being said, screw holes in drywall and peeled paint are ...


3

The process for patching should similar to drywall, but with slightly different materials. I'd suggest using wood filler at the joint. In more detail: first, get a new piece of plywood of the same thickness as the existing wall board. Then you need to attach your patch piece to structure. For this, you have two options. Cut away more of the existing ...


3

Always be safe now rather than sorry later. For the small difference is cost, use 3/4 inch sheathing or underlayment. There are several good T&G underlayment brands out there, but T&G may be a little over kill for your application. Simple sheathing, CDX or underlayment should work fine.


3

You defiantly need to support the subfloor around the perimeter. Let's say this is your floor without plywood. You want to put plywood down, but the edge of the sheet has nothing under it for support. If you don't support the plywood, you'll end up with a "soft" spot around the perimeter. Stepping, or adding weight to this area will cause the ...


2

You can hang the plywood panels with french cleats to minimize damage to the walls. One half of the cleat is screwed to the wall and the other half is screwed to the panel. Then they hook over each other to hold the panel on the wall. Make sure the cleat is screwed into studs so it can support the weight of the plywood. You can use a strip of wood ...


2

Dovetails are frequently cut in plywood, but they are typically done by machine. The resin between the plys will be very hard on the edge of your chisels and to a lesser extent the handsaw. If you were gluing up this project I would say dovetails cut with a router and jig would be great. However if you need to be able to disassemble/reassemble ...


2

Courtesy of @lsiunsuex in chat: http://www.tecotested.com/techtips/pdf/tt_plywooddesigncapacities Max Live Load Deflection = span/240, Max Total Deflection = span/180. So for a 24 inch span, the deflection should be < ~1/8 of an inch. (2.1333 sixteenths)


2

Yes it can warp from liquid. Will it in the case you mentioned - probably not. Plywood will warp if you just let the board sit with moisture/humidity/gravity. Until it is attached to something to give it shape (keep it straight) and it is coated, it will warp. Get some bracing under your beer pong top to the plywood so it can't buckle, twist, or warp.


2

I ended up leaving the warped 1/2" plywood under the 3/4" plywood and some paint cans for about a week. The plywood was visibly less warped afterwards, and almost lies flat on the ground with just a slight arch in the center. Not sure if it was significant, but it rained a few of the days, so humidity levels might have played a factor.


2

The plies (layers) in plywood are run in alternating directions, so approximately half of the layers visible on any edge will be end grain and half will be the long grain. End grain usually absorbs more finish which makes it look darker. If you want to minimize the difference between the plies you could seal the edges of the plywood with shellac before you ...



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