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16

I think the best method is to use an anti slip tape / strip / paint Tape Strip Paint They are ordered form easiest to hardest. The strips will be the easiest because you just stick them on. You will obviously stick them on the length where your tires will be going and not sideways (because that would be pointless). The strips are more durable, but ...


14

ApplePly is a brand name for an all-hardwood veneer plywood that is higher quality than your typical construction or cheap hardwood plywoods. (You may want to confirm that your "applewood" plywood is truly ApplePly). ApplePly should be similar in quality to baltic birch plywoods and like baltic birch it is not supposed to contain voids. You can find these ...


11

Plywood absorbs water and is not a sealing material, period. You can use it as base for ruberoid roof, but not as the layer exposed to the rain. When exposed to rain, wind and sun plywood will cycle through absorbing water and drying out and this will wear out the most outer layer in no time so that it cracks and the damage then proceeds to the next layer ...


11

Enter The Sagulator - it's a free online calculator for sag of shelves which is a wonderful tool exactly for these questions. Running your 2 shelf sizes, the larger shelf span (122 CM) won't hold more than about 2 KG overall without noticeably sagging. The shorter shelf (61 CM) can hold about 10 KG overall. As you can see, 10 MM plywood isn't that stiff ...


10

The same policy goes for roof sheathing as for hanging drywall, you get more strength by spanning more rafters/joists/studs and offsetting the joints. This solves two points of weakness. The main one is the structure turning into a parallelogram where the studs are no longer perpendicular to the ground. When you think of using a diagonal brace to support a ...


10

Twofold theory: Perhaps OSB is cheaper at the moment for this builder than ply and wants to use OSB as much as they can. OSB and Ply are apparently seen as the same in terms of performance and code see: http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publications/by-title/choosing-between-oriented-strandboard-and-plywood/ However, OSB, when cut, is more susceptible to water ...


10

It could be that they are trying to slow down a fire from spreading. The material at the edges might be more fire resistant, so the fire will spread to adjacent buildings more slowly, allowing the occupants more time to escape. You might be able to verify this by checking the local fire codes for conjoined (not sure this is the right term) buildings. See ...


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


7

Dove tail joints are not a good option for any type of furniture that you would later hope to take back apart. Dove tails are designed to make a strong and attractive joint that is meant to be permanent. For advice on how to create effective joints that are straight forward to put together and take apart take a study of the techniques used by kit furniture ...


6

Start by clearing out any loose particles that are still clinging to the wall. Once you've got it cleaned up, wood filler will take care of the missing plywood patch. Apply it with a putty knife and sand it smooth after it dries. It will be easiest if you use a putty/taping knife wider than the patch you're repairing. Otherwise, you'll have to do a little ...


6

How much the shelves will sag depends not only on the materials you use, but also whether or not the shelves are fixed, whether there's a hardwood strip along the length, and how they are attached. The magic number to watch out for is 1/32" (about 0.8 mm) of sag per foot. MDF is incredibly heavy - your bookshelves will weigh a ton if you construct them ...


5

Personally, I hate OSB for anything but temporary uses. It's not as strong as ply, it's more suceptible to moisture than ply, more easily damaged than ply. They use it for things like roofs and such cause it's cheap. They are counting on the roof being covered before any extended exposure to moisture, and they certainly don't expect constant foot traffic on ...


5

Nailing sheets longitudinally greatly increases the length(s), nails, and nail-downs allocated to edge nailing, the most problematic fastening that is required--you have one (eight-foot) line of rafter midline nailing for every two (eight-foot) lines of sheet and rafter edge nailing. With transverse sheathing, the sheet length and nail count allocated to ...


5

Try iron-on edge banding. Iron it on (you will have excess probably) and then trim the excess. You can usually get it pretty close to the color of your stain that you choose.


5

There are a number of methods to apply large decals and stickers to surfaces while avoiding bubbles and wrinkles. Most professionals prefer a wet method. Clean the surface first. Then coat the surface, or the adhesive side of the sticker, or both, with slightly soapy water. Then lay it down slowly and use a squeegee while laying it down. The soapy water ...


5

The plywood goes down so the groove is away from the wall, that way, after the row is finished, or at least when you decide to start the next row, a 2X4 can be placed across the joists at the edge of the next row and drive, with a sledgehammer, the second run into the first. The gap should be 1/8" between ends. The tongue and groove (T&G) of the sheets ...


4

Step 1: Step 2: PS: Don't bother repairing unless planning on trading in the dog ;-)


4

If it is MDF or HDF (as opposed to particleboard) then I would choose the fiberboard over ply. Any surface wear will impact the finish laminate, regardless of the underlying material. By contrast, MDF/HDF should be more impact resistance, water/mold resistant and uniform in density and composition. MDF above: more uniform and dense. Particle below, less ...


4

First concideration, I would encourage you to use a T&G roof sheathing such as AdvanTec instead of standard CDX plywood. This will give you a better fit and not have to worry about spacing gaps in the plywood. The price is comparable, so there is no cost advantage to using regular plywood. The sheathing should be secured with 6d galv ring shank nails ...


4

I would use MDF. It is uniform, takes paint well and doesn't warp. It also routes well. It should hold the weight I'd expect in a bookshelf (supported at both sides, about 30" wide and no deeper than 18") If you're really concerned with the sagging you might add a single center support bracket.


4

You could use MDF. Much cheaper than cabinet grade plywood, and will finish up just fine with paint.


4

Would like to put in a suggestion for either Schluter Ditra or Laticrete Strata-mat. As uncoupling membranes, they effectively stiffen floors by unitizing the tile layer. For stone installation, Schluter recommends double layer of underlayment. The second layer should be offset from the first layer, not following seams. The second layer should only be ...


4

Laminating a second layer of the same product should stiffen it substantially. Once the first layer is positioned the way you want, spread several beads of construction adhesive across the face of it and conform a second layer over the first. Tack in place with brads using a nailgun to hold it in place until the adhesive sets. Note: These flexible plywoods ...


4

You defiantly need to support the subfloor around the perimeter. Let's say this is your floor without plywood. You want to put plywood down, but the edge of the sheet has nothing under it for support. If you don't support the plywood, you'll end up with a "soft" spot around the perimeter. Stepping, or adding weight to this area will cause the ...


4

First off be aware of a couple of important points. In the old days before there ever was electricity and power tools craftspersons could build amazing things out of wood with hand tools along. Woodworking, similar to any other craft, takes patience and practice. Plywood material such as you are proposing to work with is a modern thing invented in the age ...


4

Cutting shallower (with the handle closer to the work) will encourage the saw to cut a straight line. Cutting steeper (with the handle up high) gives you more maneuverability. Start the cut being careful to keep the blade in line with the cut. As you cut deeper, lower the handle to about 30 degrees. The blade will want to keep cutting in the same straight ...


4

I've never used a Japanese-style saw, but have always found it easier to keep a long cut straight with the rigid blade of a tenon saw than with a carpenter's saw. Held at a fairly shallow angle, a tenon saw can make an indefinitely long cut in material up to about 12mm thick. Then finish with a jack plane with a very sharp blade set shallow.


3

What are you planning on doing with it? Generally, you nail or screw the plywood to something, and that gets rid of the warp.


3

I would select the product based on the appearance and durability of the finish laminate alone, with little concern for the substrate material, assuming the substrate is some viable material and not pressed paper pulp or something else obviously inferior. For identical finish laminates, MDF would be preferable to plywood as it is denser and more ...



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