New answers tagged

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Could be related to fixture units meaning the old line has too much stuff dumping into it to accommodate the new bathroom OR could be your proposed 14' run is too far to wet vent back to the stack (unless you're already planning on a separate vent, then it doesn't matter. If this is a 4" stack you should be fine on fixture units (unless you have 6 ...


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Mine was smelling and gurgling , ran some water down tub drain solved both problems .


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Gurgling drains are usually caused by obstructions in the venting system. The gurgling sound is caused by air being forced through water in your drain trap. Follow this link for more info: https://www.tradewindsimports.com/blog/troubleshooting-gurgling-drains/


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Adding an air admittance valve might help. From rmit.edu.au Depending on space restrictions, you could instead consider replacing a normal P-trap or bottle-trap with an "anti-siphon trap" Example - McAlpine "Silentrap" The major advantage of the Silentrap over Resealing Traps is that because the air is drawn through the Valve and not through the ...


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If this is a bathroom sink there is usually an overflow that also connects to the drain. Some tape over the vent and a little water left in the sink may be all you need.


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You need to get a drain plug that will give you a watertight seal. If you can plug the sink so it holds water then the vent stack can't draw air through your sink. This will then stop your sink from gurgling. Good luck!


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If you are talking about the water supply to the fridge from the house the valve may have been bumped. If you can find the valve try and turn it off "lefty loose right tight" (I still have to remind my kids that sometimes LOL). If you find a Saddle valve that looks like this these are notorious for leaking at the connection point and dripping when not ...


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Keep the fan on for a week and all the solvents in the glue should out gass in this time, most water pipes are glued and charged with water within 24 hours and in a day or 2 the solvents are gone and don't show up in testing, have been through this several times. A total pain in my back side. After 36 hours the levels were not dectable on a MSA or RGA that ...


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Power cycling a tank less gas water heater? Yours must have electronics that I haven't seen on the models I have installed. There are demand valves in the water heater that sense the flow. These valves can become sticky with lime & rust scale buildup. The reason to turn the water off then open a hot water faucet is to make a drastic change and hopefully ...


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Turn off the water heater at its controls. Close the gas valve to the water heater (WH) or shut off power to it. Open the hot water faucet at the kitchen sink and tub or shower in order to purge all the hot water in the tank, let it run until it is cold, and then shut of all the faucets you opened. Go to the WH and shut off the water supply valve to the ...


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The caped pipe you could hear the toilet flush is the clean out . This the location a snake is put in if the pipes backup. Is the second pipe outside a bathroom or kitchen? If so it may be a second clean out especially if they are quite a distance apart and if it is a clean out it should be capped also. A second possibility for the uncapped pipe is a clean ...


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First, since your problems started when the water pump got changed, you should start there. Ask your plumber if there is a one way check valve on the return line. this valve prevents cold water to be drawn back though the return line. If not have him install one. Second ask all condo owners if any of them installed a recirculating pump in their units. This ...


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Last time our hot water sprang a leak, the plumber wisely put in a cutoff valve right in front of the replacement water heater. We always turn it off when we go out of town (and the washing machine hose lines too), and never had an issue. As others noted, it would be safest to cut the power to the water heater if turned off for an extended period.


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you can purchase new aerators for some faucets. You can also take yours off and soak in in a lime dissolving solution. You can actually take some of them apart and clean the different screens and parts with the solution and toothbrush but you need to record exactly how they all fit together to put it back in proper working order. P.S. do not brush you ...


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Normally but also depending on the age of the home there is a cold water shutoff behind the tub/shower handle assembly. Remove the handle usually a Phillip screw holds it on. Next remove round lock ring which is threaded on using channel lock pliers being careful not to deform the ring. Remove large round silver plate. You will see a round shutoff that has a ...


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If you have children and none of the faucets have an anti scald temperature mixing valve then go with with medium. if you have children and do have an anti scald temperature mixing valve then go with hot. If you do NOT have children then go with hot.


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Since you have no water coming out or just a drip a large chunk of rust or scale could have broken loose from your main and plugged the water heater. I would close and open the valve to the water heater to see if this crumbles or breaks up the debris. If that works it really is time to flush the water heater from the bottom drain. A hose connected to the ...


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You have to be aware of without knowing the age and condition of water heater it's hard to say. What most people don't know is that every year you should drain your hot water tank. This removes all the rust, silt and sediment that settles in the bottom of the tank. If you're like most of us, and you don't do that yearly then you almost always shortening the ...


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The broken cap would not generally result in liquid spilling to the ground and saturating/softening the surrounding earth unless there had been a stoppage/blockage and the entire line backed up. If you have not had a blockage, consider whether the soft ground could just be the result of the recent excavation required for the install. After the line was ...


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To make thing easier and save trips to Home Depot just replace everything with 1/2" inlet by 3/8" outlet compression. The fact is, no matter what flexible hose you buy 7/8, 1/2, 3/8 inch for the water supply on sink, and toilets the internal diameter is the same about 1/4". Stick with with 1/4" compression on Refrigerators. (Typical)


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I have a question, is the toilet next to the bedroom or by the exterior wall under the window. If it is by the bedroom you may be able to remove the base board in the bedroom, with minimal damage and cost to get access in the wall directly behind the toilet. I am going to guess that the vent pipe is cracked in-side the wall and allowing vapors to creep in. ...


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If the inlet valve (bottom, in your picture) isn't opened enough, or if the other valves aren't set right, there's not enough pressure to activate the backflow preventer, so water just spews out the top and/or sides. Check out this video on how to properly "turn on" the pressure-vacuum breaker (PVB).


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My initial reaction is that it is still moisture from the January incident. Concrete can be water-tight but most poured slabs are still very porous and water will seep into many of tiny bubbles of the concrete and persist for a very long time. Though the remediation company may have come and dried the floor, the slab may still have water and it is ...


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You can get a test done which shows the types and amounts of mold in the air, as well as on surfaces. Companies will do these kinds of tests, and there are also at-home kits you can buy. Not sure of the efficacy of the home kits, though. You can also get a plumber (or yourself) to feed a camera down your drain pipes, to see if there are any leaks. If there ...


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The device is probably something like a hot water timer (but installed upstream, in the mechanical room), which comprises a timer mechanism and a shutoff or diverter valve. As to how you'd disable it, you'd have to find out the model of the device. Chances are it can be disabled via its controls. Otherwise it would need to be removed and the pipe spliced.


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Yes, a shower base should be sufficiently water tight to contain an inch or so of water above the drain. I know that mine does. Yours doesn't appear to have a lip to contain the water, so that door needs a gasket to both contain the water and prevent damage to the door mechanism. It sure looks like your builder forgot a seal or chunk of rubber gasket. If ...


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It depends on exactly what sort of pipework and fittings you have (photos in questions often produce better answers) For copper piping you can get hand-bendable "flexible copper pipe" that can be used with plastic push-fit connectors (as well as with compression fittings and soldered fittings) You can buy flexible hoses for various purposes (appliances, ...


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If the faucet set currently installed in the sink is sprayer compatible, it should have a third tube coming out of the faucet body/mixing valve. Also note, unless there is a sprayer shut off valve or a fitting that automatically stops any flow to the sprayer when the mating plug is not connected, it would shoot a hard stream of water out anytime the water ...


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What type of wallis the faucet mounted into? I was goingnto recommned a new pipebbut if you said you may break the wall that's a no go. For the winter you shoulsnt have to worry about freezing as long as you shut off the water to the facuet ibside the house and drain out your hose. I belive they do make pvc to copper but ibwould recommend just using copper ...


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The way you've drawn it, during the "limited time", the static pressure at the tap is determined by the vertical distance between the tap and the water surface in the "overhead tank" and not the "storage tank". Outside the "limited time" the static pressure at the tap is determined by the difference in height between the tap and the water surface in the "...


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Pressure at the tap -- if pressure isn't being supplied by a pump, which I assume it isn't in this case -- depends on the height of the column of water. The rain barrels in my back yard are elevated 4 feet above ground level to increase the available pressure, and it's still much, much less than what I get out of the municipal water supply. I can run drip ...


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Pay now or pay later. Galvanized pipes inevitably fail over time because they crud up from the inside which constricts flow. This reduces the thickness of the wall, so if the flow doesn't get you, the failure of the wall will. Having said that, 3" is huge, so it would probably take a while before you noticed flow constriction. You'd still have a problem ...


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I would turn off the water and the gas (the gas valve, not just the pilot).


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It's a quick connector. Water pressure actually pushes the locking mechanism to hold the tube in. With the pressure completely relieved you can press the grey ring around the blue tube inward and at the same time pull the tube out.


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A- This is not an "overflow" pipe. B- It is not connected to an "overflow" valve. C- It is a drain pipe connected to a Temperature & Pressure Relief Valve which is not only a legal requirement, but a critical safety device to prevent an over-pressure event (boiler explosion- google it) For years and years, it was common to see no pipe at all. The ...


3

That "overflow" pipe is supposed to go into a drained overflow pan, or barring that, to a drained floor. This goes to the same place as all the other drains, but can't be plumbed "hard" due to the need to provide an air gap. This air gap keeps your drains from backing up and proceeding to contaminate your water supply with nasty stuff. P.S. It's really ...


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This was a standard 3/4" pipe. I was able to cut it off, and shark bite a new piece on.


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The sink should be vented right at the sink with a vertical run up and then over to the vent. #4 cannot be a sanitary tee. It is supposed to be vertical. Your transition to the vent at position #4 is too far down the drain. If it is only a bar sink I would install an air admittance valve on the trap arm and run the 2" all the way to the trap arm. Then you ...


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Sounds like the plumbing system is not vented properly. The venting system is intended to equalize the changing pressures in the plumbing system and prevent situations like this. Unless you feel pretty handy with plumbing you will probably have to hire a professional if you want this repaired. Good luck!


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Since it is a vent to waste transition and not a waste to waste transition -- I would consider a 1.5" to 2" reducer fitting atop a 1.5"/2" combo wye acceptable (the vent line doesn't care).


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What I would do: Cut the long pipe. Move the radiator, making both cut pieces accessible. Remove and and discard both pieces of the long pipe. Unscrew the elbow-and-tee assembly from the radiator. Replace the short nipple with two short nipples connected by a union. Replace the long pipe with a longer pipe to account for the added length of the added ...


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"I'm not a plumber, nor a plumber's son..." but having watched them working with threaded pipe the trick seems to be finding the places where there is enough freedom for things to become longer (as the threads in both ends back out). In this case ... lemme check the photo again ... it looks like that coupling piece between the radiator and the L connector ...


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You want to install a freeze-, frost-proof silcock. That will allow you to turn the water off from outside, while eliminating water sitting outside the conditioned space of the home. They are available in many different lengths, so they fit most applications.


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Not being sure how the landscaper damaged the plug I would go with plastic again. My reason being, that what ever he did could happen again. If it was hit by a lawnmower, tractor or some other powered device the next time hit could result in damage to the pipe. You could be repairing the pipe along with any damage from the shrapnel of the damaged brass plug.


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I think a brass plug is an excellent choice. It is all the same threads.


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Cut it about one foot back from the lose fitting. Purchase one - 2" SLIP COUPLING. Which do not have a stop in the middle like standard fittings do. When there's little to no available movement, you need to use slip couplings. These will allow you to (after applying primer and glue) slip it all the way over one pipe, to allow the other to swing into place. ...


2

You'll want to try pulling it out - it would save a lot of headache if you could clean up and re-glue that joint. There's small odds that you could cut the loose pipe short, then break out the remaining pipe in the fittings, and then clean the fitting up enough for re-use, if you can't just yank it out. Otherwise you'll need all the fittings in the picture,...


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https://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm 608.7 Thresholds. Thresholds in roll-in type shower compartments shall be 1/2 inch (13 mm) high maximum in accordance with 303. In transfer type shower compartments, thresholds 1/2 inch (13 mm) high maximum shall be beveled, rounded, or vertical. Ramps(in general) are permitted to be 1:...


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Plumber's Epoxy is what they should've used if they were going to do that. Alternatively (providing there's space for it), use a pipe Repair Clamp. But in your setup, it looks like there's enough couplings to unscrew, to make getting new parts in there comparatively easy. Which is what I'd recommend, instead of just adding more shenanigans.


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Plumber's putty would be used to attach the drain cover to the sink. It creates a blockage and suctions both pieces together. It should be a ring of plumber's putty, when smashed is maybe a 1/2" wide. What you have is a DIY disaster and looks like someone was trying to use plumber's putty to repair a possible leak. The problem is if it is exposed to "air"...



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