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0

The only way that I know of to repair this kind of damage without replacing the pipe is to have an epoxy lining installed. What this essentially will do is add a tough epoxy coating to the entire pipe from the inside. This is something you would need a specialist for. The tools and materials are not readily available to a homeowner. An epoxy liner is not ...


0

Its evidently a pressure balanced valve. Most single handle valves are today.


1

In my case, it was tree roots blocking the sewer line. (See the preceding post about air out). Over time, the glug got worse and eventually morphed into bad drainage for the sink/tub/toilet. Cleared the sewer line and the glugs were gone.


1

The faucet needs to be disassembled from the top. I guess you already know how to do that part. If there is calcium build up visible go ahead and use CLR to clean off the build up. Now the important part, get a high quality, pure if possible, Silicone Grease. When I say “pure” what I am saying is make sure it is 90-100% silicone. If it is silicone mixed ...


1

I had the same problem and on another site it said to try plunging the toilet. I did that a few times and it worked! No more tub gurgling!


1

It depends on the make and model of the valve. If you look at the size of the water passage (sometimes referred to as the "port") you will get an idea of the size of the restriction. I have found that cheap imported 1/4 turn stop valves frequently have a small port. Whereas higher quality valves (more $$) may have a larger port or may even be "full port".


0

Using an air compressor to provide air is solving the wrong problem. There is something else wrong with your setup, such as a significant line losses in your tubing. 2 psi is enough to raise water over 4 feet, 5 psi should give you 11 feet of head. 1 atmosphere of pressure, about 14 psi, is about 33 feet of head, which is way more than what you're dealing ...


2

Would applying a safety factor to the maximum PSI in the PVC lines allow me to safely use PVC? Yes it probably would, as long as this is a personal project at your home or property. If this is in a workplace then it is likely you would be breaking the law by using unprotected PVC. I would regulate it to no more than what is necessary to provide desirable ...


0

Follow the manufacturers instructions. New and higher priced DW's are more frequently starting to connect to cold water. The better dw's fill with so little water the the hot doesn't arrive anyway unless you let the sink water run like in the shower. Better energy efficient washers heat their own water to the proper temperature for better cleaning and ...


0

Assuming you have or can get the clear tubes to attach and not leak, I'd suggest a 1-1/4" (or reducer and 1/2") PVC pipe parallel to your clear pipes, running above water level, and NO penetration for the CO2 feed line; not only run it in the bottom of the pipe as suggested by @bib, but run it inside regular, normally solvent-welded PVC vertically as well, ...


0

Probably a failed/stuck/jammed check valve, if this was the typical (maketh me shudder) retrofit installation where the hot water recirculation line is the cold water line. That makes the proper operation utterly dependent on the check valve, or the cold water line can happily backfeed into the hot water. The less-shudder-inducing system I prefer is a ...


1

If the smell starts only after you turn on the water, it is probably coming from the overflow. Take the stopper out and block the drain with a plastic baggy with a wet rag in it. This has to block the overflow drain where it meets the regular drain. Now pour the foaming snake, or other drain cleaner into the overflow. Let stand then reconnect the ...


3

Generally, law questions are off-topic, so I'll answer in a way that's broadly applicable. For the most part, building components that are no longer code-compliant are grandfathered in until work needs to be done on them. So if you have a section of galvanized pipe that's rusted or clogged, you'll have to replace that section with copper or something else ...


1

My intuition tells me this is the fill valve, it stopped when the fill line / valve were de-pressured overnight.


1

It's very difficult to tell what your existing pipe is like, as there's a shower attached to it. However, I think your problem is that the existing pipe diameter is larger than the UK shower connection? In which case you need a reducing coupler. Here's an example. But a) your existing pipe may be 1" rather than 22mm; and b) the fitting at the larger ...


0

Firstly, disclaimers: I have no idea what rules might apply in the US, and I have also never heard of a "high efficiency" washing machine. I shall therefore answer from the point of view of practicality, and the assumption that "high efficiency" doesn't affect the water coming out of the washing machine's drain hose. Size of particles: waste water from your ...


3

Since you have a flue I assume it is either gas/propane or oil fired. Most water heaters have cover near the base to service the burner or the igniter. First shut off the fuel source. If you remove the cover you should be able to look inside with the aid of a flashlight. Most burners are round and you may find that the cap has fallen into the center and may ...


0

I'm not a plumbing expert, but I installed a new cartridge in my shower and had this problem. I think a new cartridge was installed in your absence for some reason, and installed incorrectly. Should be an easy fix, shut off house water, take it out and rotate it 180° reinstall, turn water on, should work fine.


1

Some alternative possibilities would be: Build a separate (waterproof) vertical conduit to contain and isolate the water system - both incoming pipes and what looks to be a drain on the right of the image. This would not need to be very large, perhaps 1 foot square could be enough. Move the water valves down as low as possible. The rationale being that the ...


0

Another way would be to tighten the valves so much that it won’t leak. Make sure the nut is also fixed properly. It depends on how frequently you will open the valve. If it is too frequent it’s better you change the place of the switches or relocate the valves.


0

The location of the pump would all depend on ehat kind of a heating system you have. If you have multiple zones and the zone valves are on the supply, then the pump can go either on the return or the supply. If you have multiple zones but with circulating pumps the i would put them on the supply. However, if you do have multiple zones but with circulating ...


0

They won't reduce the static pressure, just the dynamic pressure when there is water flow. It depends what problem you are trying to solve. If it is to balance Hot / Cold a bit then yes, closing one a bit will work. It may be a little noisy, but nothing compared to a shower. If your static pressure is too high and you are leaking somewhere then no - it ...


0

I use a multi-port automatic sprinkler valve coupled to an 8-way drip irrigation manifold, and use city water pressure.


2

Hole saw out the center and cut a pie shaped piece out with a saws all all the way to the threads but not into the threads, then with a hammer and punch knock out the pie shaped piece and remove the rest with channel lock pliers. Do it every day as a professional plumber. And if the threads are different stop at a local plumbing outfit and get a lead plug.


4

Pressure Switch I've never seen a "safety cut-off" on a pressure system before, but typically the switching is done by a single box (known as a "pressure switch"). Pretty much all of them (at least from the last ~20 years) look something like this: The large nut is used to control the pressure (both cut-in, and cut-out) and the small one controls the ...


0

I don't see where running your line under the ceiling insulation yes you should try to keep the fitting in the walls but also heat rises and if you insulate the lines i really don't see it freezes. Also if you feel its going the be real cold at times you can alway let the water run at trickle to stop from freezing.


0

1" pipe is too small. I'd go 2 3/8" or 2 1/2" OD galvanized steel pipe (galvanized so it doesn't rust) if you can find it. I like the idea of the threaded pipe. The only negative that comes to mind is that it could be a tripping hazard or a hazard if somebody falls on it. But what if you attach the coupler to the short pipe and set it in concrete so that ...


0

MAAP GAS. Pros use this. Even if you are soldering a couple of joints it is worth the price otherwise you are handicapping yourself and will end up paying to get a pro out (who will use a MAAP gas torch.) Once you use it you will understand and be upset you didn't get it earlier. I had used propane for years to "save" money, I wish I hadn't "saved" that ...


1

The way you get a new stem is to get a whole new sillcock/hose bibb. If the stem is that corroded, the body probably is as well, so it's likely to not seal right even if you could fine one to match a specific 34 year old valve body (which seems like a bit of a stretch.) If you can identify your particular valve you MIGHT find a specialist "repair parts" ...


1

Use copper pipe through the wall. It could be easily adapted with fittings for PEX on the interior and PVC for your exterior post bib runs. You can secure it to the wall with "drop-ear" fittings that have tabs with screw holes. With the tee below, solder a 90 with a short length of copper through the wall with a threaded adapter for PEX. On the other end ...


0

There are some ways, but the best is, imho, moving the outlet somewhere else. Of course - You can use 'waterproof' boxes (not the best look if You ask me), You can move the pipes, which is unconvenient and risky. Moving this outlet to the left (there is a wall on the left, am I right?), using either same cable or making it longer - Your choice. Definitely - ...


0

My vote goes to a product called Super Lube. It is PTFE (if you're DuPont you call it Teflon) (Polytetraflouroethylene) and is food grade. It works at a very wide range of temperatures. It also works great for guns. I used it on the washers in a pressure reducing valve to keep them from deforming and to help seal them. Works great!


0

Can you provide any pictures or a more detailed description? I presume these are normal threads and you are trying to turn the wrench counter-clockwise to loosen, right? :-) It sounds like there may be corrosion involved, which will make it difficult to loosen. It could also be good old-fashioned pipe-dope that is thoroughly set and hardened. A longer ...


5

I think the best way to prevent water issues would be to move the outlet and/or valves. If that is not preferable, at least ensure that the outlet is protected by a GFI, or install a GFI receptacle at that location. You could also use a weatherproof "in-use" cover. Keep a close eye on your hoses and valves and repair at first sign of leak. Turn those faucets ...


0

Looks like you have shut off valves built in (second picture) the flat head screws on either side of the lower handle. you can shut them off and remove the cartridge to take it to a plumbing supply and they should be able to tell you. Looking at the 2nd photo, it appears that the hot side is shut off or at least partially shut off. Try opening the valve ...


4

How many splines are on the broach, how long is it and what's its diameter? As according to faucetpartsplus.com, that's all you need to get started. They have an entire list for spline counts, listing them (below) to specific manufacturers. If you can't figure it out, they suggest sending them a photo, as they're very interested in selling you parts; ...


2

Your pressure tank is what is considered "water-logged". If it is a bladder tank, the bladder inside the tank may need to be re-pressurized or perhaps the bladder tank needs to be replaced. There is an air valve on top to do this, if it only needs re-pressurizing. To my recollection, and I may be wrong, and possibly your specs may differ, the tank, with no ...


-1

PEX inherently leak at the two pinch points, because their is no contact in this area. Just put worm-hose-clamps on them. Use pipe compound too.


0

The problem is PEX clamps leak around the two crimp point areas. (Unlike hose clamps that have an overlap and have uniform area on the seal area) This leak can lead to pop offs and thus house interior flooding. Therefore homerun designs (no crimps behind walls and ceilings) allow for the leak and pop-offs to contain the water damage to a one area.


1

That screw seems to have found the magic spot and I think it's unlikely to happen again, however you might want to somehow strap a protection plate around the Tee; I wouldn't worry about the rest of the pipe.


-4

That was what someone attempted in one of my houses. The correct fix, which I finally did after several episodes of sewer smell, was to add a riser to make up for the thickness of the tile floor. Morons and plumbing do not mix well.


2

I only do it if the floor is uneven as in stone tile. It's way more difficult to do a repair later if the toilet is stuck to the floor.


0

If those were crimped-on end-caps you'd have to cut them off - but they look like "sharkbite" fittings, which can be removed. If you lack the special tool, close an adjustable wrench down to the size of the pipe, and use it to push the tan collar into the fitting. Search for "sharkbite adjustable wrench trick" or "how to remove a sharkbite" if that's ...


0

With things like that, I've found that putting a plastic bag full of white vinegar, warmed up a little is even better, will dissolve various crud and free it up. Seal it up with tape or a rubber band and leave it for a few hours or over night.


18

This is a very controversial topic. Some plumbers swear that you must seal the toilet to the floor, while others swear that you should not seal the toilet to the floor. Some guys never do it, some guys always do it, and some guys only do it depending on the flooring used. It also appears that some toilet manufacturers mention it in the installation ...


7

The actual plumbing seal doesn't have anything to do with caulking around the base of the toilet. That's all to do with the wax (typically) ring where the drain pipe and the toilet fit together, and the bolts that hold the toilet down to the floor. Caulking around the base will look a little nicer, and it'll keep water and cleaning fluids from seeping under ...



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