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Another significant risk is from a failure of the filler hoses; they have the potential to dump much more than 40 gallons on the floor. Even if you always shut off the water supply when the machine is not in use, there is always the risk of failure while the machine is running. The hydraulic shock of the washer's on/off valves could be the last straw for ...


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If a valve has directionality, it will almost universally be cast as an arrow in of the body, as seen in this globe (aka stop) valve: I've never seen a ball valve that is directional. If you look inside, you'll see the guts of it are symmetrical. I would say the general rules of thumb for this are: If you can even change the handle direction, be ...


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Consider that a typical washing machine holds roughly 40 gallons of water. Now imagine that all gushing out onto the floor at the same time. I've never seen this happen because of a washing machine failure, but I have seen it happen when the drain line from the washing machine pulled out and it wasn't a very pretty sight. If you have the opportunity to put ...


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Without hunting through all the spec sheets to find your particular valve or at least one that looks just like it (not having a number) I note that none of the spec sheets I did examine at Apollo valve for brass/bronze ball valves indicated any directionality (and in fact, you can usually put the handle on the opposite way if it's more convenient. Perhaps ...


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Usually, the easiest way to cut cast iron pipe is with a snap cutter, but I don't think you could cut it completely flush with one. A sawzall with a long diamond tip blade might work for you. A diamond wheel in an angle grinder is another possibility. Alternatively, you could frame a wood floor to the height of your pipes.


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I just bought a Sears water heater and it was making a loud whining-droning noise. (the Sears store told me it was the flue that the non Sears plumber installed- this was baloney) I called Sears tech and the repairmen said it was a known problem in a gas valve- took him 10 minutes to fix it. I couldn't see exactly what he tweaked next to the burner. But ...


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This is forbidden by the International Plumbing Code. 2009 IPC 906.2: "Venting of fixture drains. The total fall in a fixture drain due to pipe slope shall not exceed the diameter of the fixture drain, nor shall the vent connection to a fixture drain, except for water closets, be below the weir of the trap." (Emphasis added.)


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Hard to tell without seeing it, but it sound like it might be forming either a revent or a loop vent for something (maybe a floor drain in the basement?):


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Around here the answer would be no. Our plumbing inspectors won't pass drain installations where a connection to a common drain line comes before the vent. The one exception would be the toilet, which can be wet vented to another fixture. The problem is that the air admittance valve is too small to vent the toilet, and the height of the toilet trap is above ...


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This is one of those places where a little bit of plumber's putty is indicated. The problem is that there is little friction between the base of the faucet head fixture and the sink to resist the torque. Roll yourself a pencil of plumber's putty about 1/4" dia and long enough to form a ring around the hole. Add a couple extensions straight out from the ...


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If you can relocate your valve to a point opposite an interior wall, you can run it inside that wall to any depth you like, accessing the joint through the sheet-rock of the interior wall, and then closing that access with sheet-rock or installing a service door.


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Garden hose gasket, do you have one? They like to fall out and get lost, and without one it can become nearly impossible to tighten the connection up hard enough to prevent leakage.


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It's possible to get the hose screwed on by hand tightly enough that it won't leak if your grip is strong enough; I think the strength required is within the normal range for an adult (mine is relatively strong though, so your mileage may vary). But before you get a wrench, there's a couple of things you should check: make sure the threads on the faucet ...


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Easy water does not lower hardness. It is some wires you wrap around the pipes that cost $1500 and "magnetize" the limestone so it "will not stick to you pipes and fixtures as much". Look it up under scams, fraud etc...


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According to the installation manual for the spout, the nipple for the spout should be installed a min of 3/8" to a max of 3/4" past the finished wall. There is a pipe adapter that you screw onto the nipple. The spout slides over this adaptor and is set in place with a set screw located on the bottom. This allows for the correct orientation of the spout. ...


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Use a DROP-EAR elbow and provide some framing to screw it to, please. How far past the tile surface - how deep is the spout when you get to threads? 1/2" US pipe thread is supposed to be tight when engaged 1/2", so add 1/2" to that. To provide room for another turn if needed and caulking, perhaps another 1/8" beyond THAT. How small the hole - I like just ...


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I generally prefer the same floor level too, but it sounds like this is separate from the plumbing. If either route would let you get the plumbing installed (to code), I don't see any reason not to. Also keep in mind that you can raise the floor and run the plumbing straight down through drilled holes. As far as raising the floor goes, the main ...


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This is a symptom of over pressurization from a closed system (check valve somewhere in the line) and a hot water heater. The check valve could have been introduced by the municipality as part of a water meter replacement, or it could be located near the water main shutoff. These prevent water from flowing back into the municipal supply should there ever be ...


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I attached 12" plus or minus of electrical copper wire to my drain plug. Copper kills the bacteria. I have not had a problem since, and it has been 4 years.


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Copper work hardens, so every time you move that line it will become stiffer and more prone to kinking. A replacement copper tube will be "dead soft" and easier to work with. If you have the fridge back where you want it and the kinks have not produced a sharp spot (a flat is okay) then you're fine. You might want to buy a replacement to have on hand if ...


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Depends on how slight you mean by slightly.


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It might be your dishwasher, since it is hooked to the waste/garbage disposal line under your sink. If you don't use it enough, the water stays in the bottom and begins to stink like stagnant water. Throw some baking soda in it and turn it on.


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I can't be absolutely sure, but this is the best explanation I can think of. First of all, the existing venting system must be less than optimal for this theory to apply. No one can confirm this for sure without significant (and likely destructive) investigation. Second, the side line coming into the original "split" (tee-wye actually) is actually the vent ...


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The tank should be charged to the pressure at the attachment point. If the tank is attached to a point in the system where the pressure is supposed to be 25 psi, the tank should be pre-charged to 25 psi. If the tank is attached to a point in the system where the pressure is supposed to be 55 psi, the tank should be charged to 55 psi. When the water ...


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Unbolt at the section you've highlighted (yes, it should just unbolt), remove the weight, and bring the whole pull-out to the hardware store to ensure your replacement matches.


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I have to wonder if your next problem will be that the valves are too far back in the wall to install the handles when the shower walls are installed. My experience with shower valves (not, I admit, a huge number of them) is that they normally don't sit all the way back in a 2x4 wall cavity when at the correct depth, so there's normally room for a 3/4" board ...


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The only way to put it inside the walls (in a house that's already built) is to tear the walls open. When first building the house, this is easy, as the walls are not finished. Unless you were having the tiles redone, or having the opposite side of the wall ripped open, and you coordinated work between the heating contractors and the wall contractors, this ...


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I wonder if there is some pipe that has had water sitting in it for a while. I saw this at my grandmother's house where there were bathroom taps that didn't get used for months at a time. It was so that blue my initial reaction was that it was blue toilet bowl cleaner contaminated from a cistern. Blue or green water is caused by the corrosion of internal ...


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You need to box off that floor joist. You can remove an section of the joist in the way. You then build a box connecting the ends of the cut off joist to adjacent joists with perpendicular ties of the same dimensions of lumber. 2X10's for example. These ties transfer the load to the adjacent joists and give you an opening for plumbing or duct work.


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Actually, let's start with some disambiguation, as we may be separated by a common language. I've been assuming you mean the lower portion of the toilet when you say "pan" - is that correct? Given low detail and no picture in the question, I'll go on first principles and guess that a "toilet pan inlet restrictor" would involve removing the cistern/tank from ...


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Not unless they are 2x12 floor joists and it goes exactly through the center. The maximum permissible boring in a floor joist is limited to 1/3 of the height of the joist (with a 2" minimum). See IBC 2308.8.2. Sistering the joists would not effect this restriction, as it is an issue of the structural integrity of the framing member - not an issue of the ...



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