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I will try to answer this question without seeing a picture, or knowing what exactly kind of tap you have. Typically with an old tap that is not in good condition, it would make more sense to replace the entire thing instead of trying to replace parts on it. Plumbing fixture manufacturers are notorious for constantly changing their designs and making them ...


1

Not having fresh water flowing through it won't cause any particular harm since the water will deposit all of its salts/metals early on and just sit the rest of the time, so long as water stays in the system. However the right thing to do since the dwelling will be unoccupied (the only reason it's allowable to disconnect water service) would be to turn off ...


3

Alright. Your first problem is the "cheap and unmarked" part -- two prong appliances can be safe, but only if they are "double insulated" or Class II. Such an appliance will have a square-within-a-square symbol on its model number label, alongside any testing marks that may have been applied. Since this pump of yours lacks any independent equipment ...


0

check valve is looking a little crusty. they dont hold up well in potable water. cold water from the bottom of the tank will "back" through the pump amd mix with the hot giving you the diminished hot water that you descriped.


0

Sulfur smell is often caused by degradation of the sacrificial anodes in the hot water heating system.


1

You will need to contact the city to have the municipal water shut off while the repair is made. A leak like this can quickly get worse and before you know it, your entire house can be flooded with no way to shut off the water. If the leak gets worse and you can't get a hold of the city, you can call the city police on their non-emergency number and they ...


6

As @tyler durden comments, this may be an issue with the drain, but it is very unlikely that there is no trap. A more likely scenario is that a partial blockage or obstruction of either the drain line or a vent line is causing a siphon action that is preventing the trap from maintaining a water seal. Another possibility is that one or more drains have been ...


11

If you are on a public water supply, there may be water test results already published on a quarterly basis. If you are doing your own testing, generally an environmental testing company or consultant (rather than a plumber) - in many cases you can save money if you can follow directions carefully and take the samples yourself, for testing at their ...


2

"Duck" or duct tape is pointless here. You MIGHT get some temporary slowdown from using a self-fusing silicone overwrap, but it's not a solution, and will be difficult to use effectively on an active leak, especially with an elbow involved. You need to contact your water company and arrange for the water to be shut off from outside the house so this can be ...


0

Use the adapter. Why go through all the trouble of installing a new shutoff, if you don't have to. If you're using any fittings that have rubber washers, don't over tighten them. The washer could be crushed, deformed, or pushed out of the way.


1

In this case it would be a lot better to just replace the shut off valves, by adding an adapter you are just adding one more thing to break or go wrong and cause leaks! -7 years plumbing experience and red seal certified (Canada)


0

Eric was correct with the minimum flow rate, I would recommend removing you aerator, and removing some of the water savers that the companies have put in which are meant to slow down flow, this could be just enough to dive your problem!


1

In this case the gasket (not band) is supposed to go above the slipnut, it does not matter how much the slipnut is actually tightened on though. It may not go up fully and if it does then the band is way overworn and needs to be replaced. Try putting the gasket back in front/above the slipnut and tightening it! If this holds the water and it doesn't leak ...


2

To avoid cross-threading, spin it backwards until you feel it drop into another thread; this is where and when it's lined up. First attach it to the sink and then fight with other connection, leaving everything lose until it's all fitted together. For the fitting you have, turn this picture up-side down: (make sure the grommet is properly orientated) ...


1

When it comes to locating shut-off valves, it seems antipodeans are more ruggedly individualistic than the more conformist locales I inhabit. Live in a house? You’ll find the valve near the front of your property ... our valve is located inside the front fence near the boundary with our neighbour. For those of you with larger properties, it might be ...


1

Yes, what's left of it anyway. My guess is that all of the filters were removed and the lines were just put together so you didn't ask, "Hey, what's this do?". -Nothing, they took everything except the kitchen sink. espwaterproducts.com/about-reverse-osmosis


1

You should be able to find caps that just pop on, or in the pipe. Or you could get a test plug, if you really want.


1

If you have flexible piping running to the bottom of the faucet: turn off both the hot & cold the water supplies disconnect the piping from the faucet aim the hot water pipe into a bucket and turn the hot water back on (quickly turn it off, of course) repeat for the cold water side If you're getting water in the bucket, the faucet's the problem. If ...


0

See the threaded tube? There's a nut threaded on that, which holds the plate in place. Use a Basin Wrench (or any wrench you can fit in there) to loosen the nut (rotate the nut anticlockwise to loosen it), and the plate will slide out. If the nut is stubborn, and doesn't want to budge. A good shot of penetrating oil can loosen things up.


1

Call your utility. They should be able to send somebody out to turn it on, or at least explain to you why they haven't already. The utility owns the meter, so you shouldn't be messing with it. Rest assured, they will hold you responsible for any damages to the meter.


3

It's ABS cement, you should be fine. IIRC, the "yellow stuff" is the typical multi-plastic version that's somewhat more commonly found (IMPE) and can join ABS, PVC, CPVC, or any mixture of them - around this area, ABS is rarely seen other than already installed in old installations, so the yellow stuff is more useful to folks who need to repair or adapt it ...


0

Classic water hammer prevention was simply a vertical deadend that permanently trapped air to cushion rapid pressure changes. It can be installed anywhere in the system that is easily accessed


2

You'll use a 3" x 3" x 1-1/2" PVC DWV Sanitary Tee. It's important that you use a sanitary tee, and that you fit it in the proper orientation. Or a 3" x 1-1/2" PVC DWV Reducer Coupling Venting island fixtures can be difficult, since you obviously can't simply install a vertical vent pipe. The Family Handyman has a good article on How to Plumb an ...


0

Opening a drain valve downstream will not raise downstream pressure, it will increase flow and lower total system pressure. If there is any flow the valve should close, as pressure above the diaphragm equalizes with supply pressure upon closing of the solenoid pilot port. Get the brand and model # of the valve and order a rebuild kit for it as your problem ...


1

PEX would be a good alternative to a 'PVC' product. It also only has a slightly lower working temperature than CPVC (180F compared to 200F respectively). It is rated for potable water. It does not have a great UV resistance, however unless purchasing specialty CPVC or PVC with 1-2% Titanium Dioxide, neither are these products. I believe unless working in ...


2

CPVC with a coat of paint on the outside to protect from sunlight. Of course, a non-PVC pipe might suit your actual needs better, depending on your actual needs.


1

Home Depot shows Delta #RP12516. It should be a somewhat universal part. Any brand should fit. If they don't stock it they can order it. I would first try a local hardware store they are likely to carry a store brand for less than a Delta part. You will also need the clip that attaches the rod to the pivot lever.


0

Remove all the trim covering the valve assembly/s (handles, escutcheons, trim plates, etc). Inspect (with flashlight) for signs of leak source and moisture. Turn valve/s on whilst inspecting to see if there is a leak associated with the actual valve/s assembly/s. Look for source of water. If you cannot at least get a general idea of where the leak is coming ...


-1

If the leak occurs only when the shower is on, then the leak is after the tap and before the shower head.


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to This is what my plumbing supply house sold me to attach 3 inch pvc threaded pipe to cast iron.


1

Normally the valve is installed as soon as possible upon entering the home, and the pipe enters low to protect it from freezing (at least in freezing climates.) The logic is that this minimizes the area where a fault can occur that you cannot shut off. The secondary logic is that you rarely need to shut off the main supply, so it need not be too convenient. ...


1

If water is coming up through the pipe then it is because either your sewer is clogged, you septic tank is full or the leaching field has failed. What you are seeing is a sewage backup. It could be ground water entering your septic tank, or it could also be sewage from elsewhere in the house. The basement toilet is the lowest drain in the house and this is ...


1

The furnace tech indicated it was an improperly connected pipe used for bleeding air from the system, and it was also unnecessary as we have bleeder valves on the hot water circuits. They removed the pipe and plugged it, and we haven't had an issue since.


2

Unless it leaks, or you have access below and want to gut the plumbing, don't touch it; just add a repair ring: (use solid 1/8" steel ones to save space, not the flimsy, flanged type which are overall larger in size; even with these you may have to shim the toilet. I find that grout fills the gap between the porcelain and tile nicely, whether or not the ...


0

If you're referring to a black, rubber flap stuck to the bottom of the seat where the bowl drains to the pluming, then that part needs to come off. There will be a new one on the new wax ring that you'll need to buy.


0

That looks a moderately standard tap What I'd do, Shut off water to the faucet (isolation valve below or elsewhere). Use pliers to pull the spring-clip off. Use the correct sized spanner to undo the nut. Remove the assembly. Take the parts to a plumbers-merchants or DIY store. Show an assistant the parts and ask for advice about replacement washer. Buy an ...


0

Since the question is 'can', and the situation is not a major threat to safety or welfare of people and property, in similar circumstances, a 'friend' of mine used solenoid lawn sprinkler valves. $10 what is not to like. http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/Signature-Sprinkler-Valve-Solenoid-p/7962.htm My friend got his at Home Depot - but I could not find ...


1

I think my first step in sorting this out would be to positively identify the feed from the supply main, shut it off at the main, cut this whole business out at least temporarily, and connect the house to the main without all this "stuff." If, as appears to be the case, the pressure from the main is being reduced before it's increased, something is just ...


1

The typical mid-trap joint of a plastic P-trap does not have a washer. Instead there is a tapered end that fits down into a smooth beveled hole on the opposite piece. The tightening of the nut forces them together to form a tight seal. Your's looks to be this type. If this joint is leaking for you then there are several probable causes. There is crud on ...


0

Since you mention only the bathroom faucets and nothing else (kitchen, shower, etc.), I would start at the faucets in question. Maybe they are newer and have a restricting aerator or valve components to meet local water saving requirements; maybe they are plugged up with debris; maybe the supply hoses are kinked; maybe the stop valves are not open all the ...


1

If you mean a 1/4 turn ball shutoff valve, they are not directional - there is no such thing as backwards for 99.95% of them (and for 0.05% it might make some difference in potential for a leak when closed, but none to water flow when open.)


0

A basin wrench is NOT the correct tool to try to tighten the faucet mount nuts that you show in your pictures. Due to the nature of the valve construction another type of tool is called for to tighten these. The tool will look like a hex socket end but is able to slide up over the long mounting stud to engage the nut. Tools of this nature are often made of ...


0

Move the clean out trap up to where the right toilet is,right toilet to the clean out. This will stop cross flow from too large systems. This should reduce cross flush and vent clogging, I think. This looks to be the easierest think to help reduce your issues but I dont know. That 90 in the waste after you puzzle nut can't be helping either... how far ...


8

What you're after is a tool called a basin wrench: It can reach up behind the sink and tighten those nuts.


0

My toilet which is on a septic tank and has started doing this during heavy rains. I believe @Mike is right, the septic system is backing up...don't flush the toilet if it is bubbling because it will overflow. :(


0

If you have access to the underside of the roof, removing the pipe and reconstructing the roofing is not difficult. Such a repaired roof is much less likely to leak than with the pipe sticking through over the years. By the number of steps, this might seem daunting, but each is very simple and an intuitive step in a lasting, trouble-free repair. The ...


0

I see one issue that doesn't meet the plumbing code. Before you drain down in the vertical there should be a vent. An air admittance valve will take care of that and probably your dining issue too


1

We have the answer - Talking with the well/plumbing company that we had replace a jet pump in a prior home years ago, as he heard the issue he offered "just what filter cartridge did you replace?" It was a sediment filter, and he asked whether I might have replaced it with a carbon filter instead, and that if I had, the pressure issue might be caused by much ...


2

I think you have two completely separate issues that you became aware of at the same time, and which are mostly unrelated. Improperly set system and air pressures in bladder tanks. A note - the higher the system pressure, the less water storage (drawdown) in a bladder tank. So you might get better performance from a 40/60 or 30/50 setting. You are also ...


0

Under the sink, you probably have a shutoff valve for the cold side of the faucet. You could tee off that to a hose bib. The hose bib would have its own closure (I personally prefer the 1/4 turn ones), and you could put a short section of hose on it. You'd probably want to figure out some way of clipping the end of the hose high up in the cabinet so residual ...



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