New answers tagged

1

First, wait for a foul-smelling day and obtain samples from before your filter, and from hot and cold faucets. Send them to a testing facility that YOU choose. Well-established bacteria can easily survive a chlorination treatment, as it will only kill the bacteria on the surface layer. It might be your city's water. It happens from time to time in my city ...


1

You do need an air-gap. In my state it is legally required (Cal Plumbing Code 414.3) Contrary to what you might mistakenly interpret from some other comments, it does not serve the same function as your sewer/drain vent system. It is not a "vent", it is a vacuum breaker.


0

The purpose of an air gap in the dishwasher line is to prevent dirty water from a backed up sink from entering the dishwasher and contaminating your clean dishes. It's a type of vent. All drain lines in the house need some type of vent, and a drain in an island is no exception. You don't need an unsightly air gap sticking out above the counter top, but ...


2

Bear in mind that even though precautions are made, it is still possible for the pipes to freeze in a particularly harsh winter. You are going to want a shut off valve with a built in drain on it. This will allow you to winterize it. The shutoff should be located in an accessible place which is below where the tap will be. If you are on the first floor, ...


2

As mentioned by Jimmy and Tester, this box has both threaded and sweat connections. To answer the more general question of sweating threaded adaptors: Typical when sweating thread adaptors, you sweat the adaptor onto the pipe first, then complete the threaded connection, and lastly sweat the opposite joint at the other end. In situations were the opposite ...


4

If you look closely at the valve inlets, they are designed with a 1/2" male iron pipe thread (MPT) for a threaded connection, OR you can solder 1/2" copper pipe directly to the inside of the threaded fitting. It's made to accomodate either method. You do not need any additional fittings. You need to be careful though, there are o-rings and teflon seals ...


0

You might want to attach (sweat) a copper pipe union (picture below) to the female threaded fitting (pictured in your question). The other end of the union would be sweated to the lines in the house. This will allow you to screw the entire assembly together (and take it apart if necessary- like for replacing the valves). Of course you will need two copper ...


2

The air gap in that faucet is specifically for a RO system and is not meant to replace an air gap for a dish washer. It does the same job, but it's for the drain on the RO system, and certainly would not be able to handle anything close to a dishwasher drain.


7

As long as the attached timer is shut off and no water is flowing the pressure in the water line will be no different than what it would be when the spigot is turned off. You water bill will reflect how much water that you actually use. The only way it could go up astronomically would be if the timer broke off the spigot or failed in an open mode where ...


1

Improper flushing often results from minerals clogging up the holes under the rim of the toilet. The usual cure is to clear out the buildup with a muriatic acid treatment.


1

Galvanized pipe can last a long time, without "failing". However, while the pipe might look great on the outside, the inside is likely restricted by corrosion and deposits. All galvanized pipe I've ever removed, looks something like this on the inside. My advice to anybody that still has galvanized pipe in their homes, is to replace it as soon as ...


1

Galvanic corrosion occurs when galvanized steel is in direct contact with copper and creates pin holes in the copper from the inside out. Copper does not degrade the steel pipe. What does happen inside the steel pipes is rust/mineral deposits form on the interior walls much like arterial buildup in a human being restricting your water flow. Because the ...


2

I believe Oregon uses the UPC as the basis for their state/local code. Under the UPC S traps are illegal, and that's what you have there. S traps are illegal because they can cause the trap seal (the water that prevents the sewer gasses from entering your house) to siphon out.


3

40-50 years is a fair lifespan. I've seen plenty of houses with galvi that was 60+ years old without it failing, the real issue to me is if you want to wait until it fails to replace it. Not greatly accelerated the process, no. Yes. Potentially and at decent expense. It depends on the size of the water service, condition of the piping, and access point. ...


0

Keep in mind your water heater doesn't only run when you're using hot water. (assuming you have a regular tank-style unit, tankless are a very different beast) There's a number of things that COULD potentially be causing the noise but without more details it's gonna be impossible to say what. Unless you notice any other symptoms I wouldn't worry about it.


1

It could be a DIY project, PVC is easy to work with. Only thing you really need to watch out for is to make sure the new piping you install is CPVC. Neither Schedule 40 nor Schedule 80 PVC (the other most common kinds) are not legal for install inside the house in most jurisdictions. CPVC is also the only kind of PVC rated for hot water. That said, ...


3

Yeah, a handy DIY person could do the re-routing of those hot and cold water line connections. You would have to deal with shutting off the water supply, cutting out all the old stuff and then re-plumbing in with new piping and fittings. Hopefully you get all the parts that you would need in one initial trip to the big box store. Do be aware as you get ready ...


2

Could the melting ice water have caused a permanent leak to have developed? (my emphasis) Leaks generally don't repair themselves. Since there is evidence of a leak, it is very likely this will recur. This means that the leak needs to be actively investigated and fixed to prevent further damage. You downstairs neighbor will probably get someone to ...


-2

the ice froze some water standing in the pipes and that created a clot, so when more water came through the pipes, it overflowed (overflew??)


2

If the PVC drain indicates the age of the plumbing and the house, or at least when the slab was installed, there should be a layer of poly acting as a moisture barrier in between the concrete and gravel. Aside from that, all you need is to add the original gravel back into the hole and repair the vapor barrier and finish off the fill with a bag or two of ...


0

this is funny, I have this very one on my tub. Spin the stopper around and locate the flathead screw on the side. And as some else said hair might be the cause of a slow drain.


1

No, it is not. If you read the manufacturers' instruction on the ABS cement it says to seat the pipe completely in the hub. Now... I have cheated the above instruction on more than one occasion but never to that extent. If you are careful, gluing to 1/2" of pipe will probably not leak immediately. The problem is that the strength of the joint will be ...


0

0.5 inches is not enough of a pipe length to bond on a new fitting. Full insertion depth for a new fitting flange is on the order of 1.25 to 1.5 inches. You should consider adapting your new connections off to the right side of the picture where there is more of a straight section of pipe to work with. Trying to rework at that Y connection will lead to a ...


3

could be the cold has shrunk something, maybe rubber isolation, and the water was able to go around it (something like that caused the challenger explosion) could be the cold has cooled down the neighbours ceiling and the moisture in the room condensed there, like when you use air conditioning


1

There should be a mounting nut on the faucet stem which holds the faucet from below (under the counter). You will need to shut off water heater AND the water to the heater, and disconnect the supply pipes. Take the mounting nut off and pull the faucet out. When you look inside you will find something similar to the armature for pop-up drain plugs (I think). ...


1

Here in the UK one would normally use a compression repair coupler to repair a copper water pipe. Normally because it's burst but it would work just as well after removing that (presumablly) redundant and leaky valve. The repair coupler is longer than a normal coupler and only one end has a depth stop which makes it easy to slide onto a gap in existing ...


0

My double kitchen sink was installed (licensed plumber) as the picture, and seems to work fine (10+ years). I see no problems.


0

As far as I know, having two separate sinks served by a single trap is not code compliant. You will need to replace the existing sanitary tee on the stack (inside of the wall) with a double sanitary tee. Normally, these double tees are used for adjoining bathrooms, so you can have a sink on each side of the wall, and share the same stack. In this case, you ...


0

"But I would do a simple test to see if you have an airlocked pipe..." Hmm, this is new to me. Could you please explain a little more how air pocket in a pipe can stop pressurized water from flowing? I can see a hard object can block the pipe, but a soft air pocket -- softer than the water -- can block the pipe. I agreed that the OP's issue could be a bad ...


3

There are basically two solutions: 1. Remove the saddle valve and replace with a coupling You need to do this if it is leaking from the rubber flashing around the pipe. 2. Cap the Valve You can unscrew the valve stem retaining nut and cap the top and side of the valve with compression nuts as described above. You can do this if, for instance, the valve ...


5

There were some good suggestions to replace/remove the saddle valve, and I'll likely do that eventually. For now, though, I was able to cap it off with a 1/4" compression cap, similar to the one pictured below.


2

If you remove that, water is going to spray everywhere. You might be able to find a cap to screw onto it at the local hardware store. If it's at the end of the pipe you can easily fix it by: Turning off the water Purchase a pipe cutter (sort of looks like the letter C) and costs about $16.00 USD Purchase a 3/4" or 1/2" Shark bite connector. Around $5.00 ...


6

It's a self-piercing saddle valve like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB76LXrYKsU . If you're familiar with electronics, it works a lot like the so-called "vampire tap" for coax cable. Regardless, it's a quick and easy solution in the short-term, but they tend not to last. Because they are cheap, they tend to fail easily, and because they are ...


1

Consider all the dual-basin kitchen sinks... "If it happens, it must be possible."


10

Turn the water off, and remove it. Those things are rubbish, and always leak eventually. If you need a valve there, cut out the damaged section of pipe, and install a proper tee and valve. If you don't need it, cut out the damaged section of pipe and install a coupling. If you're not an expert solderer, They make push-fit fittings (SharkBite® is the well ...


3

It's a self tapping valve, usually to provide water to a fridge. You can either replace it or eliminate it (use a coupling instead).


2

They both do the same thing except the one on the left has an integral compression ring (ferrule) and the one on the right uses a separate ferrule (which is not in your picture).


0

The one on the left tightens the "compression ring" around a (usually copper, but could be plastic) tube. The one on the right tightens itself onto the "coned" (sorta' phallic-shaped) end of a pipe.


2

There might be a set screw that holds the top part on. You'll have to pull the stopper up as far as you can, and look under it with a flashlight to find it. This YouTube Video might help.


0

The brand name of the faucet is often found facing the wall. Put a hand mirror on the wall and illuminate it with a flashlight.


0

After you try Iggy's answer to clear the pipes, if you still have a problem, I would suspect the pressure balancing valve is malfunctioning. That is why only the tub is having this problem. You would then have to disassemble the shower/tub valve and at least clean it. You may need to replace parts of it. Good luck!


0

I see that you have a copper tube coil inside that enclosure. My guess is that the experiment you are trying to accomplish requires that to be copper? If so, is there a reason that you couldn't transition away from copper to PVC inside the enclosure? If that is an option, then you are left with sealing PVC to PVC which is much easier. Of course, you ...


2

I too have struggled with gluing copper and PVC for certain experiments. Silicone is an ok choice, depending on the pressure, but white silicone just happens to be less effective for sticking to stuff than clear silicone... I don't really know why, I just know that it is. It's kind of too late to use anything else now that you put silicone on it (actually ...


4

April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


3

Being that you are repairing an unpressurized drain, the squareness of the pipe end is not nearly as critical as a pressurized supply line. Just make sure to clean and prime the pipe prior to applying solvent cement. Additionally, if you have a level handy, lay it across the drain once the fitting is in place to to ensure proper placement. Side note: It ...


1

I have removed several of these sinks in the past when remodeling turn of the century homes. They were bolted directly to the studs with ¼” lag bolts that were ~2-1/2 – maybe 3” long. One had a bracket it slipped on to no screws through the back is this the type of bracket you have? that one had 4 nails into the studs. There was no other support. All of ...


5

There is a tool that is made for cutting out the PVC pipe in a joint so that it may be used again. That tool may be useful to square up the end of the pipe in this case if you were able to hold the tool inline with the pipe while it shaves off the high part of the pipe. This is what one example of the tool looks like. These are used to chucking up the ...


0

I agree with PJS1987. Another option is they sell a plug and play camera that would save a lot of digging and yard damage. Just plug into your laptop and stick in the pipe. Worked great for me to find a broken drain pipe. http://www.amazon.com/Eggsnow-Borescope-Endoscope-Inspection-Camera/dp/B00L8OEHEM


0

My personal preference is pipe dope instead of Teflon tape every time unless doing low pressure flared tubing. Teflon tape only works if applied properly and that seems to be an issue a lot of the times. Pipe dope you coat the threads and it fills in the areas as you tighten. Yes it can be messy but having to go back because of a leak can be very costly. ...


0

Of all the normal plumbing materials, by far copper has the best heat exchange characteristics. I would spend the money on the copper tubing for the collector itself. It will pay for itself with the difference in the amount of heat collected. After that, you can pipe to and from the collector with PEX or CPVC if you like. The supply and return lines will ...



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