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0

I ended up getting it done without a fuss. It wasn't bad at all. I have very limited experience, and still struggle on 3/4" ball valves, but 3" copper is no big deal as it turns out. I used one of those hardware store Mapp gas torches and a half a tub of flux. Took a whole lot of sanding to get the old stuff down to bare copper, but the 40 year old copper ...


0

If I understand your question correctly, you are running a pipe from the in-wall mixing valve into the attic space to supply a rain shower head. This means that the water in this pipe will never be under pressure. Make the pipe accessible and protected, insulate around it. This should be more than sufficient.


0

Not sure if this is the right answer, but this is what I did: removed a piece of drywall from the ceiling and cleaned all the insulation that fell down built a small plywood box in the attic above the ceiling (only covering the top and sides, with access from below); insulated the seams with silicone ran the pipe through the plywood box re-drywalled the ...


1

You might have luck using two brazing torches, like these. My concerns usually aren't about making a mess; it's getting it to work without burning holes in it and physically getting it back together after a de-solder. I'd start over, but it's worth a shot on a $20 fitting. I'd say my re-solder success rate is 50\50 without doing more work than just using ...


0

No. Simply remove the flush pipe and the rubber/ plastic cone from the back of the WC pan, insert the restrictors, then reassemble.


1

That's not the problem. The zone valve is not working. Zone valves stick either in the open or closed positions when they go bad. In your case bc heat won't go off its stuck in the open position. Need to replace zone valve


1

It's not to plumbing code if it's just discharged onto the yard. If used for subsurface irrigation, it can be a compliant greywater system, with the plants acting as a biofilter. The issue being that the Laundry has potential for fecal coliform (of course, if you wash with soap, most of them will be dead, but that's the reasoning, ignoring that soap and ...


1

What you are looking for is the Laundry-To-Landscape system: http://oasisdesign.net/greywater/laundry/ This system works very well and is easy to implement yourself at very lost cost. I have implemented it myself and it works perfectly, providing much needed irrigation water to my parched desert yard (not a problem in Mississippi I imagine!). And unless ...


0

Your plan is decent, but I'd amend it slightly: Turn off the water Take off the scalemaster and throw it away Replace with a couple couplings and a regular piece of pipe Turn the water on. Be happy you saved your money by not buying a pointless device


3

Pressure In a system fed from a header-tank, the pressure depends only on the height of the tank. To increase pressure you have only two or three options: Raise the tank higher. Install an electric pump (these are often used for showers) If your header-tank is filled from a high-pressure municipal supply, you would probably get better pressure from that ...


1

There is nothing you can do to increase the pressure of a gravity feed system. Install a pressure pump on the shower line. They are automatic pumps that come on when you turn on the shower and do a great job.


1

in that short run: size of pipe has little effect on pressure. You say the tank is overhead - Is this gravity feed? In that case pressure is a result of gravity (height of water column) not size of pipe. If it is a pressurized system - a 1/2" pipe over the length you are describing would not decrease the pressure. Quite often low flow out of facets is a ...


1

where is the home? he most important question: Does it freeze in your attic? Even if it freezes - if the pipe is beneath ample insulation it is ok - Unless you are on an extended vacation - in which case must leave the heat on low enough to make sure the house envelope does not drop below freezing.


1

You should be able to turn the body of the angle-stop if the nut is held firm with another wrench. if you turn the body and not the nut - It is less likely to damage the copper tube. Depending upon how tight the nut was set - will determine how deformed the copper pipe is. sometimes it is difficult to remove the ferrel. You have so much oxidation on this ...


0

Is water going over the holding tank or toilet bowl? If the toilet bowl; then there is waste line blockage either at your toilet (in the bend) or further down line, this coupled with a leakage of seal in tank allowing water to continue to enter bowl would cause an over flow. If you do not hear any water flowing into your toilet and the supply valve is ...


5

It's definitely a backup from a source higher up than the toilet. It could still be on the same floor of the house/building. i.e. The washing machine drainpipe is likely higher than the toilet. The backup can be clear if the source is something like a shower, dishwasher, washing machine. Since you are in an apartment, you should first contact your ...


1

It is made to glue to 3" or 4" drain pipe. I can't tell for sure but it looks like it glues over 3" or into 4". You need to make sure the flange and glue are compatible with your pipe. If the pipe is white it is probably PVC, make sure you have the PVC flange and glue. If your pipe is black it is ABS, make sure you have...blah, blah, blah. The flange may ...


1

I would recommend replacing all of the affected pipe. The PVC already looks pretty roughed up, and you don't want to invite more problems in by using a rubber gasket fix! Start by making sure no one is going to flush any toilets, use any sinks, or run any water. Otherwise, things might get messy. Measure the distance between the 22.5° pipe and the T joint. ...


0

This answer assumes you're just trying to do it right as opposed to having to pass inspection... Code is great and all but I'd be satisfied with whatever you do to prevent sewer gas from entering the house. Especially if you replaced it (even with the same setup) instead of yet another hack job at that poor pipe. Cut the fitting out and do what must be ...


0

Did the house sit empty for a while before you moved in? Could be the trap dried out and your smelling sewer gas. Just using the drain would fix that. Since you dumped so much powder in there I'd just put a bucket under the trap to catch stuff and remove the trap to clean it out if it's the sink and it's easy to get to. The "J" portion under the sink is ...


3

Saddle valves are terrible as actual valves. They are a cheap/easy way to tap an existing water line, but that's it. After you use them a few times, you just can't rely on the needle to cleanly seal against the punctured hole of the copper pipe, and to cleanly come back out again. In your case it also looks like there may be some galvanic corrosion on the ...


1

Counter-clockwise is correct. However, it looks like that valve has a leak. If it sticks, I wouldn't mess with it too much as it might gets stuck open or leaky. The simplest way to fix it is to just replace the saddle vale with a new one. A better fix would be to cut that section of the pipe out and replace it with a Sharkbite T. Then you can attach a good ...


0

Probably the leak is at one of the fittings. Dig out both ends and wipe the fittings dry and clean. After an hour or so run your fingers under the fittings and check for water drops. If the leak proves to be somewhere in the pipe it may be easier to rent a ditch witch (trench digger) and just replace the whole line with proper hose.


1

Start digging. And next time, use 160 or 200 PSI black polyethylene (NSF-PW rated - ie, suitable for potable water, per Fiasco's comment) rather than PVC. (You may not "need" the pressure rating, but it gets you a thicker wall which makes the pipe even more durable .vs. the normal 100 PSI stuff. And digging is something you don't want to have to do over.) ...


2

Try a plunger first and with persistence. If that doesn't work, snake it. I don't think you'll solve this by pouring chemicals in there, and the potential for "collateral damage" (and not to mention, safety concerns) with having a pipe full of chemicals is worth the extra effort involved in the mechanical solutions.


3

You should have a shut-off valve before your hot water tank (your main entry valve), shut that one off, open all the faucets in your house to drain the hot water from your system, do your repair, turn on the valve that is before your hot water tank and turn off all your faucets. You could keep a bucket closeby, just to get what's left in the pipe.


1

They make pvc pipe-removal drill bits. There's a guide on the front that goes inside the existing pipe, and cutting wheels that remove the inner pipe without affecting the outer pipe. sample image from plumbingsupply.com, no affiliation There are also specialized tools, called a pipe debonder, that heat the pvc until the glue starts to release, and you ...


3

A weak acid is the way to deal with a plug of baking soda. It'll turn the plug material into CO2 and a soluble sodium salt of the acid. It'll take quite a bit of acid to deal with a pound of bicarb though, 84 grams is 5.4 moles of the stuff. Regular vinegar runs at 5% acid strength, that's abot 200 grams per gallon, 3.3 moles. So you'd need abot 1.6 gallons ...


0

Baking soda powder will turn into a cement like mass and completely clog everything it settles in. I had a family member dump about three cups down the kitchen sink this summer and I ended up having to replace the trap, tailpiece and dishwasher drain inflow. In this case, it was set up so hard that a snake couldn't even budge it. If that's the case, it's ...


4

Yes, it's possible to bench solder, and in fact you should generally avoid soldering on an assembled threaded assembly. "Oven soldering" is a completely absurd approach to plumbing. Save it for your SMT electronics projects. If you are very uncomfortable about soldering, just use threaded pipe (steel, brass, stainless steel...) and threaded fittings.


1

I strongly advise against pouring gallons of Draino and equivalents down the drain - you can try the recommended dose once and if it doesn't work - get a snake. I recently battled a really nasty clog which resisted everything - except for a snake. Since it's in the bathroom, you will probably be dealing with lots of hair and soap gunk, which is difficult for ...


1

Try a plunger or a snake. More hot water might also help, if you can get it to the drain (possibly sponge out the water currently in the basin.) Adding more chemicals to the drain is probably not going to help at this point, and will make dealing with the backed up water more dangerous if you use typical "drain cleaners" on it. Those rarely work well in any ...


1

Yes, you are in an excellent position to add a basement bathroom. Definitely involve a competent plumber in this process. Properly venting and properly attaching the new waste drains to the existing waste drain will be important to prevent the basement bathroom traps from being sucked dry when waste is leaving the upper floors. This is an easy part to mess ...


1

If the tank water level is correct and you don't detect a restriction/blockage between the tank and bowl, and the drain below the toilet is clear; the problem could be a restriction/partial blockage in the toilet bowl trap.


0

I second the comment that a photo would be helpful. However, you might be able to use a flexible plumbing fitting such as those made by Fernco.


1

My first thought was venting as well. The washer and tub may have different vents and have no bearing. I'm assuming, of course, that you tried the simple approaches, like pulling out the drain stop to ensure it isn't clogged with hair and gunk, and dropping the trap to ensure it is clean? I had an issue like this with a tub drain where the vent was ...


-1

The guy who always shuts off his water when he goes on vacation never says if he shuts off the gas to the heater or leaves it running. I would assume he shuts it off. That being said it is a major pain in the behind re-lighting the pilot. I hate getting down on my knees on the concrete basement floor to see if the pilot light is lit.


2

You might try calling Moen about it since their faucets carry a lifetime warranty. They would send you out a new o-ring at no charge. The O-ring you got as a replacement may not be the correct size unless it came from Moen. If it is the correct size and the faucet leaks, then the faucet parts themselves may have worn out to the point that a new o-ring won't ...


0

In situations like this, since part of the tee is broken, I would recommend using a rubber coupling with hose clamps to attach a new flange to the existing tee. Size the coupling in the store with a new flange and tee to make sure it is the correct fit. It is important to clean up the broken flange in the tee before installing a new flange. I've had good ...


-1

I've been using wax for years, but recently very unhappy with the products we buy in wax style rings. By the time you get the wax ring out of the packaging you may as well be the wax ring yourself, your hands pants and body are covered with wax. We've been using a new product called Sani Seal. Really sweet and very reliable. See their web site and videos. ...


0

According to this reference, the pipe should be in the fitting 9/16" for 3/4 NPT threads. This one states 0.400 inches for hand tight and 0.5457 for maximum. WRT the above 9/16 is 0.5625 inches, so some minor disagreement there. This one agrees (within rounding error) with the second (0.400 and 0.546), and also provides a helpful guide for number of turns ...


0

PTFE tape DOES seal. NPT threads have a spiral leak path even when fully tight. This is because they engage on the thread flanks, but the roots and crests don't touch each other. With iron and steel piping, as a general rule, if it doesn't break when you tighten it, it won't ever. Fittings most often run undersized compared to the standard; in fact, in ...


1

Well either the diverter isn't closing off the hot and cold to the mixing valve or there is an issue with the mixing valve itself. You wouldn't be able to physically see anything wrong with either until you start taking them apart. If you noticed your handle moving "faster" that can signal that the handle was not tightened properly or has stripped ...


-1

You cannot insytall a softener without a soft water loop. the soft water cant go to cold side of KS, refrigerator or hose bibbs.


0

Are you sure the noise is air in the line, rather than pipe expanding/contracting as it heats and cools or simple water turbulance? Is there a manual bleeder valve you could use to release any trapped air, as there is on older radiators? If so, there are automatic bleeders (basically float valves) which could be installed. You'd want to do that at the ...


0

http://www.pfisterfaucets.com/Bath/Product/R90-TD2K.aspx Found this puppy at Home Depot. It's a universal kit, like the Danco, but it's actually high quality. Did the job and looks great. Cost me $99. Also, I was saying my valve was a "Moentrol" based on the Danco trim instructions. Turns out, it was actually not a moentrol. It's a "moen standard" which ...


0

Moentrol is the type of valve, the single knob that pulls out and pushes in for flow control and rotates right and left for temperature control. There were numerous trim styles offered with that valve type, so just saying "Moentrol" does not adequately describe your needs. Some of the old trim plates were marked with the word Moentrol, but many were not. If ...


3

I have had my Bosch dishwasher for about a year using the same setup you contemplate, so I'm familiar with the exact drain connector you have on the dishwasher hose. On mine, there was something of a taper between the 1/2 and 3/4 section and being rather flexible rubber, and I had no difficulty stretching the 1/2 section of the fitting to fit on the 5/8 gap ...


0

I found the source of the problem, and thought I'd post the answer in case anyone is having the same issue. I needed to turn up the temperature on the hot water tank. For some reason, when I have the temperature set to 108, the kitchen faucet doesn't trigger the tank to kick on. When I set the temperature to 120, the problem was resolved.


2

Best thought I've got is to get a couple of tubing size adapters, and additional pieces of tubing if necessary, so everything's connecting to a matching size. Note that if a hose is a bit too large, a hose clamp may compress it enough to get an adequate seal.



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