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0

Re-replace them with cast iron ;-) it is a known thing that CI drain pipes are quieter than plastic drain pipes. Other than that, insulate them with mineral wool or fiberglass to deaden the sound.


1

We have lived in this well-built and well-maintained 25-year-old home for three years and for three years, one toilet smelled like old urine within hours of thorough cleaning. We called a plumber who said all was working well, and that there were no leaks. I finally had the plumber come back and pull the toilet and check the wax ring. Which was FINE, but ...


0

It could also be that you may have some pockets of air in the pipes that cause them to jump or knock. You can try shutting off you main water valve, then open all of faucets until there is no water left. Then with the faucets and spickets open turn the main valve on.


1

You need to evaluate where the leak is really coming from. Use some paper towels to thoroughly to dry the whole fitting area. Then watch to see where water first appears. I suspect that you may find the leak coming from here: ..as opposed to the PEX joint. It appears that you did not use a Teflon sealing tape on the pipe threads.


0

It's probably just vibration making the pipes wiggle at a certain flow rate where the vibration wavelength oscillates just right to be amplified into actual pipe movement. Wherever you have access, strap down the pipes. If you do not have access, you will need to decide how irritating the noise is compared to the work required to gain access and strap down ...


3

It's a trick question, you can never get 4 bar of pressure with only a 20 m head. The pressure due to a vertical column of liquid is equal to the density x height of the column x the acceleration due to gravity (little g = 9.8 m/s2). Your height is 20m Density of water is 1000 kg/m3 g = 9.8 So, pressure is 196,000 Pascals 100,000 Pascal per bar, so ...


0

Given that 20 meters of head only equates to 1.96 Bar (1m elevation = 0.0980413943 Bar), no pipe alone will do this - you'll need a pump, or you'll need to accept less than 2 Bar as all the pressure you have available. Then you need to determine the flow rate you wish to operate at for sizing the pipe - you'll get 1.96 bar with any size pipe and no flow ...


1

Pressure of the gravity fed water delivered from the overhead tank will have nothing to do with the pipe size used. The pressure is dependent only on the vertical distance between the top of the water in the tank and the delivery point. Where pipe size does come into play is in the flow rate that is needed at the delivery point. If you only have one ...


0

From my experience, some single handle shower cartridges cause hot water crossover (bypass) due to mineral buildup on the pressure balance or scald prevention device inside of the cartridge. (often a stainless steel piston is involved in the pressure balance design, and when it gets fouled by minerals in the water, it affects the temperature control. ) I ...


0

I understand your explanation and what to do, just not sure I want to be the one doing it or that its a good long term solution. Having worked on building houses over the years, I've done anything from framing to electrical wiring. Even hung drywall, thrown mud and done simple texturing, but that's an art I've never been good at. One thing I've never done ...


0

There are two practical ways to deal with this. Before getting into details let me say that you should stop trying to join the trap parts of metal pipe to the trap parts of plastic pipe. Method 1. Remove the metal pipe with the J bend and complete the P trap with plastic parts. Then join the plastic pipe to the down flow drain system where the pipes are ...


0

Increasing the pipe size from 25mm to 50mm will definitely reduce the pressure loss along the pipeline, making more pressure available; however, 25mm is already a pretty good size for a residential water pipe and the pressure loss may already be very small. So the difference may not be noticeable. Unfortunately, the problem is likely just the lack of ...


0

Carefully dig it out (a garden hose may be useful for "hydro-excavating" right next to the pipe, otherwise some careful trowel and shovel work) and figure out where it does run, then you can decide what to do about it. Beware of possible other poorly buried items while you are digging (wires, etc.) Assuming you have to work with where it comes out of the ...


4

Short answer is, because the 1/2" flexible tubing is short enough to not cause a major pressure loss. If you ran 1/2" line the whole way, it would be too much pressure drop. Pressure drop across a pipeline is a function of all the friction losses added together. These include "major" losses (the official terminology, not mine) from the friction with the ...


2

Remove everything currently under the sink that is not glued and use a rags to plug the drain pipes. Next, let the counter guys do there work and install the sink. There is nothing to do until they are done. After they are done, follow the install instructions on the disposal. After that is done, mount a new p-trap kit from one of the drain pipes to the ...


1

I looked at what was available, didn't like any of it, and simply ordered enough Tees (3/4 x 1/2 x 3/4 mostly, with a few 3/4 x 3/4 x 3/4) and valves to build my own from PEX (using a ring of 3/4" PEX as the "manifold."


0

Plumber's silicone grease. Silicone Faucet Grease helps reduce friction and provides long-lasting lubrication. The grease is water resilient and oxidation resistant. Resistant to most harsh chemicals Retains its consistency in temperatures from 40 to 400 F.


0

Do you want to be able to easily assemble or dis-assemble or both? there is a problem that the lubricant will also make the stage easy to fall apart. your choices: soapy water - will make it easier to assemble and remain hard to dis-assemble Silicone spray - is a good lubricant to use, since it is fairly non-reactive and effective Petroleum jelly - this ...


0

Many toilets are held in place around their bases with silicone sealant only these days, especially if the cistern is fastened to the wall. No toilet I have ever seen (in 30 years in trade) is mounted directly from underneath i.e. accessed from under the floor). Many modern toilets have a pair of plastic multiholed brackets that are screwed to the floor, ...


1

You will need to adapt from PVC to hose thread if using hose thread quick disconnects. If you can find pipe thread (on the fixed side) quick disconnects that would be one less fitting to adapt, as PVC to pipethread is a standard fitting, and I'm not aware of any direct PVC to hose thread fittings (may exist, I've never seen one) so I expect you'd need a ...


0

I think just cutting the pipe and gluing it together is the best way to go in your situation. Dry fitting can still be hard to removed, as you've discovered! Also, PVC solvent does not melt surfaces to weld joints together. In fact it's easily unglued, should it ever need to be.


1

Unscrew the white compression nut and take a look at the sealing ring that is under it. These can get hard with age or over compressed and lose shape and thus lose its ability to squeeze tightly to the down drop pipe from the sink drain. If this is the case it is an indication that the sealing ring needs to be replaced. The common type of the sealing ring ...


1

The white fitting should be on top of a small compression ring, so when reassembling the pipes you would add the white female threaded fitting, the compression ring (thin side pointed down), and then the black male threaded side of the fitting. When you tighten this by hand, the compression ring will get squeezed between the two pipes and make a water tight ...


0

If the exit of the proposed pipe is lower than the entrance, this will work fine, but it will leave standing water in the pipe itself below the exit. If the exit is the same level or higher than the entrance, this will not work and you will need a pump.


3

Coathanger, cut into a wire, with a hook on the end might work. Push the hooked end past the stuck brush, keeping the hook near the perimiter of the pipe. Rotate the hanger 90° so the hook is under, and engages, the stuck toilet brush. Pull up on the end of the coathanger with a pliers or vicegrips.


3

First as Henry Jackson mentions the low flow shower heads are part of the the water consumption laws passed in the US. I am not sure how the US compares to other countries. I have done construction in France and in Spain and nobody has mentioned this to me and I never really thought about the pressure after installation - if I were to guess they seem to ...


2

In the US the low-flow shower heads are mandated by federal law, so it may not be easy to find a non-restricted one. I am not a lawyer but I would think that advertising the un-restricted flow rate would be a subversion of the law and therefore unlikely to be legal. If you want a non-low-flow shower head I would just take the restrictor cap out of any ...


0

Many hardware stores and Nurseries have covers specifically for this purpose that can be ordered or purchased. I had a $30 plastic dragon covering mine, but after it got stolen I went with a less noticeable man-made stone one.


0

I ended up fixing this issue by capping off the heads and turning the system on for hours at a time as opposed to just a few minutes. This extended time running the system while capped off allowed buried line breaks to be revealed. There were multiple line breaks and crushed heads run over by vehicles in the past. I fixed all this last summer. As a ...


0

Badly clogged kitchen sink drain insisted on staying clogged. I turned up the temp on the hot water and ran the dishwasher a couple of times with a stop-start action while draining and using a plunger, which seemed to help, probably pushed the clog further down, based on how long draining water then took for it to start backing up. After augering, (wouldn't ...


3

It's not "backwards" or a "mistake" at all - it's perfectly standard for dual (separate hot/cold control) faucets. In a sink deployment, you pull the outside (away from the faucet) of the handle forward to open, and push it back to close - that requires the hot and cold to close in "different directions" from a clock-wise perspective - which is perfectly ...


0

I have used a Powerful Wet/Dry Vac for loose pieces before, if that is not the case, and the Grout is a solid piece, Go to the hardware shop and buy a small bottle of Hydrochloric acid, it’s also called Muriatic acid in some places. Dilute the acid with water (2 parts water, 1 part muriatic acid) and pour it down your drain. You may need the repeat the ...


0

A 4" block of pressure-treated wood, or cedar. A drill. A frost-free-sillcock 4" longer than the connection to the pipe inside to the outside wall surface. Some screws, type dependent on wall materials. Paint. Optional on cedar for certain values of "finished look"


1

Water hammer, no air quotes needed. Noise in pipes from the momentum of moving water, suddenly stopped. Draining the pipes is providing temporary air bubbles which cushion it. Water hammer arrestors, either in the form of a few feet of capped vertical pipe at the end of the run to hold a more lasting bubble, or spring/plunger/diaphragm/piston units sold ...


1

It's called "water hammer", and it's caused by the physical momentum of the water in the pipes being dissipated when the flow stops suddenly. By draining the system, you're creating an air bubble somewhere in your plumbing that provides a cushion for the momentum, eliminating the banging, but this bubble is leaking away somehow, which causes the banging to ...


1

You need to use tubing that is rated for hydrogen gas. McMaster-Carr may have some. Likely you'll have to use stainless steel or an exotic plastic like teflon. Normal hardware-store tubing will react, possibly violently, when used with such fluids/gasses in them. If you're cracking water into hydrogen / oxygen, that line will need to also be customized for ...


0

I have only ever used more rigid plastics like polyethylene tubing with push to connect tubing. I would not trust vinyl, as it's soft and tends to creep more. In that vein, I'd say nylon is ok too. I'm unfamiliar with that type. Of pvc.


8

Get two bladder-style drain cleaners. Insert one down each sink. Turn them both on simultaneously and they'll inflate until they block up the sinks, at which point they'll fill the plumbing in between the two and use pressure to push the blockage down the only remaining path. If this drain proves to be problematic in the long-term, then you'll have to ...


6

The most obvious choice is to modify the plumbing at the point indicated below to allow for a cleanout plug to be added. The fitting shown would be replaced with one that looks like this: In such installation the straight through part of the Wye Tee fitting is closed off with a plug which is easily removed to insert a cleanout snake. Adjusting the ...


1

There are about 5 steps to this and it's easier if you have a breakdown diagram. The pictured hose bib is a Prier, probably a C-138 Two for the price of one, first section is how to replace the seat washer, second to repair stem leakage. Note: The Handle, Stem, Stuffing Box, Packing Nut, Packing Nut Seal and Seat Washer all come out as one complete ...


0

There are two nuts. One is the packing nut, right under the handle. It tightness the packing around the stem and keeps water from leaking around the stem. The second nut, called the bonnet nut, below the parking nut on the body of the hose bib, keeps you from opening the valve so far that it falls off leaving you with a mess! You cannot take the stem out ...


-2

try muriatic acid but be careful


0

Tighten the joint slightly. Pipe threads are tapered - the PTFE thread tape (or pipe dope - I'm currently more of a fan of PTFE pipe dope than of PTFE thread tape, though I used to be a big fan of the tape as opposed to old-style dope) provides a seal for the "helical leak path" (the fact that the female threads are a bit sharper than the top of the male ...


3

First guess, it's just junk from the pipes: you didn't properly bleed the system after having used a shut-off; remove aerators, run water. Next, a faucet with a sprayer has a flexible line; each end having a grommet that may have deteriorated (as with all other flexible lines). Lastly, if the valves are old enough, their packing may have deteriorated to ...


1

Probably enough that your guests can easily see that it's not clear when their dog is looking for a convenient drinking bowl, going for the most obvious inappropriate use of toilet flushing water as potable. Alternatively (and probably requiring a bit more dye) would you notice if you were handed a glass of the stuff that it was blue, or green, not clear? I ...


0

...and following on my comment, locking pliers would be my gripping tool of choice. this flavor with curved jaws: Not this flavor with straight jaws. However, for the level of stuck you have, I would also use a hammer, in conjunction with the locking pliers - put the things on so they are like this picture looking from above, quite tightly. Tap, don't ...


1

The grating is likely part of a threaded barrel that sleeves through the porcelain of the sink and comes out the bottom. This barrel has threads on it under the sink, and a wide and thin nut is threaded onto them squishing the barrel and grating against the sink and securing it. To remove it, disconnect the P-trap beneath the sink first (have a bucket ...


0

The pump and pipe (force main, being on the far side of the pump) size should be specified by your septic system engineering documents. While I feel similar to the commentators about pumping sewage, sometimes it's the only way (house on a lake, for instance.) I would strongly suggest both the "two pump and alarm" method (preferably with a pump controller ...


0

Groaning, rumbling, or other low-pitched noises from a hot water heater are typical symptoms of excessive sediment buildup in the heater; normally, flushing it via the bottom drain valve is recommended to clean out the sediment buildup. If not cleaned out, eventually the heater's lower element will burn out due to being buried in insulating sediment ...


1

The issue was indeed a siphon, and it was actually a very silly cause. Upon removing the fill tube, I noticed the water level on there was at the same level as the water level in the tank. But hold on a second, why would one see a water level on the fill tube? Well it turns out that at some point, the clip that goes on top of the overflow pipe which is ...



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