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0

the first picture appears to be dish or clothes washer drain hoses. But to answer your questions: if the hoses are pliable or soft enough any short length of (PVC?) pipe similar to the inside diameter of the hose should suffice as a coupler to join two sections. Secure with hose clamps. Regarding splicing into an irrigation system; if it is not under ...


0

Clogged Siphon Jet, in my case. Annoying since I already pulled the toilet and snaked the line... Live and Learn.


0

The Pressure gauge reading cycles between the pump cut-in and cut-out pressures. Sounds like the gauge is dead and permanently stuck at 24psi. Often, the cut-in and cut-out pressures will be listed on the pressure switch and commonly are 20psi cut-in and 40psi cut-out. So your water pressure on the gauge will cycle between 20 and 40psi during water usage. ...


0

From my well I have a pressure tank, then a sediment filter, then a whole house Morten filter, than a water softener.....with these appliances I don't want to lose flow....each has a 1" hookup on it and feed in is a 3/4 " copper......should I go with cpvc in between 1" or Pex 1"


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The sink faucet has a leak and needs repair? The dishwasher drain line is connected usually with a barbed wye connector. It could just be the residual water left from when the dishwasher completed the drain cycle. Or water from the dishes in the dish rack?


-1

Go from a 1-1/2" line right off of the water heater, down to 3/8" if need be to your appliances.


0

"Let some pressure escape" would be happening every time you open a tap downstream of your pressure limiting device (regulator), if there is one on the system. That pressure reading (which is quite high, by the way) means one of the following: your pressure limiting device (regulator) has failed and your mains pressure is currently quite high the pressure ...


1

You'll want a 3/4" nylon hex nipple. Commonly they're available in white, gray, and black, though other colors may be available. More importantly, you'll want to make sure the fittings are NSF/ANSI 61 compliant. NSF/ANSI 61 certifies that the fitting is suitable as a drinking water system component.


0

The crimp clamps were designed with a built in 360 degree feature in the band to prevent an incomplete seal. I have not used these clamps on ant plumbing applications. However, this type of clamp is used extensively, In automotive applications. It is a patented design that has been extensively tested under extreme pressure situations. The whole secret to ...


2

I can't find anything in the IBC that prohibits exposed supply pipes in bathrooms. The only relevant sections I could locate were: 310.2 Location of fixtures and piping. Piping, fixtures or equipment shall not be located in such a manner as to interfere with the normal operation of windows, doors or other means of egress openings. ...and... ...


0

If water is flowing back through the hot line with the shut off valve closed on the cold (inlet)line would indicate a leak in the tank or a faulty shut-off valve not completely closing. If the supply valve is off (closed) water flow stops. Check for air in the tank by opening the pressure+ relief valve with the cold valve shut. Water should sputter from it ...


3

When copper oxidizes, it turns green. Usually there has to be some kind of catalyst to cause oxidation. Potential catalysts include salt, iron and any kind of acid. Acid will form in water due to dissolved carbon dioxide. Usually if copper is getting green, it is because it is getting wet. In the case of a boiler, this could be due to water in a humid ...


0

(Not going to be as helpful as I'd hoped, but maybe helps you think of something you hadn't thought of) Since you mentioned the kitchen is right below, I'm going to assume finished walls/ceilings and that you can't easily trace the pipes(or maybe you're lucky and it's a drop-tile ceiling?). I've heard of a few ways to find a leak, but they almost all ...


1

This is an interesting problem. I'm wondering if you can bury your water supply line so that it would be unaffected by the frozen ground temperature? (Think below perma-frost and ground heave). Also, if the water is being piped a short distance from building that is already being heated maybe an auto draining valve (as @Ecnerwal mentioned) could be installed ...


1

You need a "frost-proof hydrant" (which will have a garden hose thread, not a fire hose thread.) That is a valve that is buried below frost line. On the hose side of the valve, there is a small, deliberate leak (this should not leak when the valve is open.) When the valve is closed, the leak drains water from the standing part of the pipe. Without heat, ...


0

Your all wrong here. Front loading top loading has nothing to do with bad smelling. Even if you hand wash them still the same thing !!! I have know idea why is this.....if you leave your laundry unwashed for a day or three, you will end up with with bad smell.


1

Could be a venting issue causing the siphon to live up to its name. That will normally result in a very low water level in the bowl. It can also allow sewer gas into the house.


1

More than likely the tank is filling the bowl above the bowl's fill level, and the bowl drains slowly until it's level with the top of the trap (or siphon). Unless it's completely draining, there's really nothing to worry about.


4

A - Expansion tank. This prevents the pressure increase due to heating water, from damaging the plumbing. The tank is filled with air, that is separated from the water by a bladder. When the water expands due to heating, water compresses the air absorbing the pressure. B - Check valve (or back flow valve). This is designed to only allow water to flow in ...


3

The white pipe at the top left appears to have a thermostatic mixer valve. That's the output side of the water heater. To avoid running out of hot water too quickly, the tank is set to a somewhat higher temperature than is actually desired, and this valve mixes that with cold water to get the actual temperature and sends that to the rest of the house. The ...


1

In one hole, and if the seat is open, out the other. If it doesn't seal well even though you have replace the 'washer' at the end of the stem, a seat grinder will smooth the seat out. Go find a 75 year old plumber, he will have one. An alternative valve stem packing was a rope like material - the neoprene washers you added are a substantial upgrade. I ...


0

The issue is not 'what is in favor' but what the building code requires. Here is a general rule: toilet: 3" or 4" washing machine and shower: 2" sinks: 1 1/2" nothing smaller. combined vent through roof must be equal or greater than size leaving the home to sewer or septic. This is just a guideline - I take it you are not hiring a plumber to do this work. ...


0

Look on line for information, that your city should give you, about remodeling/permits. You should be able to apply for a Home Owners Permit, that should save you some money. But be ready to give them drawings of what you did. As for the Inspection, be ready to rip the sheetrock and any tile off the walls and back to the studs. A city inspector will not ...


3

If you go to apply for a permit for work you already did, you might get one of any number of reactions, ranging from, "just pay us our fee and go away" to "an inspector will be out next Thursday to make sure everything visible looks fine (and just pay us our fee)" to "you need to rip out all the finish materials so our inspector can look at the plumbing and ...


-1

I wonder if you could address the glue used for connecting PVC pipe - whether gray outdoor, or white pipe, or "UV resistant"… specifically when the PVC piping will be used with an ultraviolet generator for pool sanitizing. I just had a big failure of a glued joint in dark gray, schedule 80 PVC pipe, leading into the side of an ultraviolet generator built by ...


1

It's not a problem. Pressure tank volumes add in series and this should do exactly what you want.


3

Find a better store, if the ones you are going to don't have 2" PVC in full sticks (or possibly look higher up in the store you are in, and get someone to drag it down.) In MY house, the only place you'll find 1-1/2 or 1-1/4" is the tailpieces on the sinks - as soon as it hits pipe, it goes up to 2", because it's not that much more expensive and it greatly ...


1

What you have may not work. The Douglas valve or flush valve (The brass looking piece in your toilet) extend through the toilet and the Ell goes into the valve and the whole thing setts with a nut. If the repair kits flush valve does not have enough to set, go through the tank, allow the ell to set and screw down with a nut, it is not going work. You may ...


3

SharkBite® only officially supports 4 types of pipe, according to the FAQ Q: What types of pipe can SharkBite fittings be used with? A: SharkBite fittings are certified for use with: Copper pipe hard drawn Type K, L and M and annealed Type M not to exceed 3/8 nominal, complying with ASTM B88 PEX pipe complying with ASTM F 876 or CSA ...


0

If it is for outdoors, then go ahead and plug it in. If it works, then great. If it doesn't, then take it out or release the sharkbite off the tube. You can visit sharkbite's site and they go over the sizes and what they warranty, but I have gotten it to fit on outdoor installs of things a lot like your description. Obviously you want to pressure test ...


1

You will need a P-Trap. If you look at the inside of a toilet, it won't have a P-Trap inside, but it is built in such a way that gas cannot vent into the air. It sounds to me like your issue is because of a small shower drain-line connected to your shower. To fix this, you should use a larger size pipe for your P-trap that won't get clogged. Please ...


3

You need the trap, for precisely the reason you guessed. Toilets have the trap built into the toilet itself. What you could do is get a strainer made to fit under the plug - often used in kitchen sinks. They are easy to find at most home stores or even dollar stores. That will stop any big stuff from going down the drain, and give you a chance to pull it ...


4

Just to add some visuals to the others' explanations using your photo, you need to (1) push on the collar trying to move it parallel to the tube, and (2) pull the tube. To reconnect, push the tube into the collar until it stops (should be about 1 inch). Make sure the tube end is square (perpendicular to the tube axis, with no damage); cut a bit of the tube ...


1

In this case, it doesn't look like you need the vent loop at all, and the 6" height requirement is well-covered by the vent stack going clear up to the roof. If you want to put that loop in, it definitely isn't going to hurt anything. It just doesn't look like you need it. You could branch off the vent stack above the junction and use a flatter slope to ...


4

This is polypropylene, but the connectors are very similar to PEX quick-connect fittings. You need to push the protruding collar (the inner tube that the polypropylene is secured into) back inside the connector, and you have to apply the pressure to that collar evenly. You might be able to do that if you're gentle enough with a pair of pliers with the jaws ...


2

This is what I call a "push to connect" fitting. They are put together by pushing the tube into the fitting. They are released by pushing the small collar into the fitting and then pulling out the tube. Sometimes they are slightly stuck, and may take a little bit more force to pull out the tube, but it should be if if the plastic collar is first pushed into ...


0

I had a similar problem with a toilet near a cat litter box. A member if the family had been flushing the clumping cat litter scattered by the cat into the toilet after sweeping it. Clumping car litters are clay based. Over time, the clay ha adhered to the walls of the serpentine in the toilet reducing the opening. Replacing the toilet and relocating the cat ...


0

Big box stores -- and other stores, for that matter -- generally offer both "builder quality" (ie, cheaply-made stuff that looks good but isn't as durable) and higher-quality goods, in everything from locks to appliances to you-name-it. Often both are available from the same manufacturer, so the brand name and style alone aren't enough to tell them apart. ...


3

I phoned Kohler to ask them this exact question. The answer, at least for Kohler, is that if the part number is exactly the same, the product is exactly the same. However, some parts, sold only at the Home Depot and Lowe's, have an "R" prefix on the part number. This stands for "retail" and can signify that cheaper parts have been used to reduce cost; for ...


2

Very odd, but here's a thought on how to troubleshoot. Shut off water pressure into your water heater. Test each one of your hot water taps. If any of them work, something is mixing cold water into your hot water pipes. Some one-handle faucet and shower fixtures can do this if their internal seals are worn out. Find it and fix it. If they all only work when ...


5

What about if you used a screw-on hose bib anti-siphon adapter. You could screw/jam it on along with a generous amount of 2-part epoxy putty (like J.B. Weld) and have new garden hose threads... and anti-siphon protection as a bonus!


3

Most shower heads seal to the shower arm using a rubber washer. If that's the case with yours, the purpose of the threads is more to hold the washer tight, not provide a seal, and teflon tape or thread sealant compound are not useful.


0

Yeah, that's weird. Thoughts: Hot water heaters have hot and cooler ends, due to thermodynamics. The hot water should be pulled from the hot end, but that might not be done right, either due to internal weirdness or connecting it backwards. Maybe the hot water heater has multiple coils, and one burnt out? I suggest measuring the temperature of the hot ...


0

Try a bent wire coat hanger to pierce and hook the putty. If you can't, does water still seem to drain? I would pour some water down there slowly to see if it's draining properly. You could even try boiling water which might make the putty more malleable and help flush it down. Ultimately, if it's draining I don't think you need to worry about it. Just ...


1

Probably not a good idea. Clothes washing machines generally discharge a large volume of water at a high rate, the drain apparatus is built with a standpipe (either inside the wall or outside where you can see it) to accommodate the volume. The standpipe holds the water long enough for it to drain without overflowing. Alternatively, a laundry tub/sink is ...


1

The kitchen faucet is a very common type and you just need a set screw of the proper diameter and length to replace the one that's gone missing. Take the handle to a home center's plumbing repair aisle, or to a plumbing supply house, and you should be able to get one. You may want to soak the lever in some vinegar first, to clear the calcification so it's ...


6

You need a pex stub-out bracket that attaches to the studs: And a 90 pex support that attaches to the bracket: It would be nice to have a sleeve and a escutcheon: Your PEX will still be a little wobbly, but connecting it directly to the toilet valve is considered by many to a better solution than using a copper stub-out, because there is no fitting ...


0

Depends on the valve. There are valves with some means to mount them, and valves with no easy means. You can provide some sort of wall-mount bracket that you clamp the valve and/or pipe leading to it to. There are folks that make copper pipe stubs which attach to the wall and keep the PEX behind the wall, with copper sticking out into the room. There are PEX ...


0

On the shelf at the renovation store of your choice you should find a variety of replacement parts for faucets. Some valves open clockwise- some open counterclockwise . Some early plumbing was the style of the United Kingdom / Britain where water came in Cold and Hot - and some plumbing is simply Hot and Cold. Thus there was a need to have replacement ...


3

This has been an ongoing problem in the bathroom sink we use the most. When I was using conventional solutions (Drano and the like) to unclog it, I just assumed that there was a bunch of hair in the drain. This was a problem every couple of weeks, though, and I hated spending so much money on toxic drain cleaners. A couple of years ago, I happened across a ...



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