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0

Are you sure the noise is air in the line, rather than pipe expanding/contracting as it heats and cools or simple water turbulance? Is there a manual bleeder valve you could use to release any trapped air, as there is on older radiators? If so, there are automatic bleeders (basically float valves) which could be installed. You'd want to do that at the ...


0

http://www.pfisterfaucets.com/Bath/Product/R90-TD2K.aspx Found this puppy at Home Depot. It's a universal kit, like the Danco, but it's actually high quality. Did the job and looks great. Cost me $99. Also, I was saying my valve was a "Moentrol" based on the Danco trim instructions. Turns out, it was actually not a moentrol. It's a "moen standard" which ...


0

Moentrol is the type of valve, the single knob that pulls out and pushes in for flow control and rotates right and left for temperature control. There were numerous trim styles offered with that valve type, so just saying "Moentrol" does not adequately describe your needs. Some of the old trim plates were marked with the word Moentrol, but many were not. If ...


3

I have had my Bosch dishwasher for about a year using the same setup you contemplate, so I'm familiar with the exact drain connector you have on the dishwasher hose. On mine, there was something of a taper between the 1/2 and 3/4 section and being rather flexible rubber, and I had no difficulty stretching the 1/2 section of the fitting to fit on the 5/8 gap ...


0

I found the source of the problem, and thought I'd post the answer in case anyone is having the same issue. I needed to turn up the temperature on the hot water tank. For some reason, when I have the temperature set to 108, the kitchen faucet doesn't trigger the tank to kick on. When I set the temperature to 120, the problem was resolved.


2

Best thought I've got is to get a couple of tubing size adapters, and additional pieces of tubing if necessary, so everything's connecting to a matching size. Note that if a hose is a bit too large, a hose clamp may compress it enough to get an adequate seal.


2

I would recommend installing a faucet with an integral sprayer as a less complex alternative to modifying a porcelain fixture.


1

I'd hesitate to remove it because it might be a radon vent. A preliminary search for the levels in Massachusetts (Appalachians=granite=radon) reveals some scary hits. It might have been a slow news day IDK, but you should find out what the levels in your area are and whether or not you do have one. Does it face a driveway? We just installed a head-scratcher ...


0

It seems to me that you have cartridge problem. Replace it and you would be fine. There is nothing wrong with your pressure or your plumbing. And Oh, Pex is fine.


1

This sounds like the exhaust vent for a radon mitigation system. If so, there will be a fan constantly running in that system and the pipe will exhaust somewhere near the roof line. I would not recommend removing this since it was likely added after radon was detected in the area.


6

Laundry Shut-off valve - any hardware/plumbing store or the internet.


0

Followup: On the seventh day of clog, before the plumber appt was even made (property manager is horrible), I noticed the standing water was gone, and there was no more clog, everything ran fine. Weirdly, the next morning I noticed a flood on our first floor where the water heater is. I don't know if the events are related but it was a strange coincidence. ...


0

That is just a shut-off valve.


0

Never heard of such a thing. But off the top of my head, you could mechanically link two hidden conventional spigots. I'm imagining a faucet handle connected by a shaft to a conventional toothed gear. That gear is meshed to two additional gears each of which is connected to a spigot. Turning the one faucet Handle then operates two spigots. Far from off ...


1

No. If you cap one, it's no longer a vent. You need vents for the plumbing to work correctly. In some cases you might combine several vents in the attic to reduce roof penetrations, but if you already have two holes in the roof there's not much to be gained by that now (perhaps when you next re-roof, if it's practical to combine them in the attic and all the ...


1

Simple (and cheap) method would be to install the mixing valve set of your choice for the wall with the shower head and install two simple control valves upstream of the mixing valve unit, one for hot and one for cold. You could leave the mixer set at the temperature and flow rate that you normally use, the upstream valves would basically be remote shut-offs ...


0

posting an "answer" so i can address all 3. it can't be the air conditioner, because it's still happening. and because it happened in the summer too, i crossed out "hot water moving thru cold pipes." that's why i noted that it's been happening over at least 5 months. the sanity check is funny! i know when it started and my folks were here, i immediately ...


1

Sanity check: Are you sure it's actually dripping? Hot-water pipes expanding/contracting due to temperature changes can sound very similar to a drip as they slip/stop/slip against their supports, and that's more likely at this time of year when the difference between a pipe with hot water flowing through it and one that's been sitting for a while is more ...


1

If it occurs during summer, and days when you run your air conditioner, its likely they fed the condensation drain pan to the house drain. Try turning off your AC for a whole day and see if you ever hear it. Its also possible that its someone else's AC unit that is drained to your drain, or in a multi-unit building, the common drain that happens to run ...


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Wall hung toilets are put in basements so that it is easier to slope the exit drainage to the main stack. With some models you might get an extra foot upwards which is huge for a basement you don't want to dig out. Toilets don't have to be on their own sub branch although it is usually done that way.


0

A small leak can drip for a LONG time before it shows on the other side of drywall, particularly if the drywall is double-layer firecode (as may be the case in an apartment building, depending on local codes.) One possibility is that this is a condensation drip of some sort - from a dryer duct or bathroom vent fan duct. Then again, it could be coming from ...


3

You could try using a pick-up or claw tool to reach down in the drain to grab it and pull it out. Something like this one at Amazon.com.


1

It sounds like what you really need is a remote controlled shower valve and temperature controller. Most major manufacturers are offering these now including the likes of Kohler, Moen and others. These give you remote digital control of your shower including temperature, timer mode, warm up mode and flow rate control. If you're not prepared for the ...


1

Sure I think you could do this. You'd need another set of supply lines at the other side, and a second valve. You'd then run the pipe for the shower head to the other side of the shower and T it in with the other shower head pipe. The only downside I can think of is the cost - a good thermostatic valve is expensive!


0

One time my friend spilled water on his carpet and it smelled like dog pee. Maybe you have wet carpet.


4

In my part of the world, PVC P-traps for sinks and basins are universally designed so that you can easily remove the U-bend from below without tools. I wouldn't hesitate very long before undoing all the obvious nuts visible in your picture† and attempting to gain access to the U-bend. In some cases a strap-wrench may be useful, but usually those joints ...


0

Make sure you are hooked up on the low pressure side of the regulator and I would bury a 5/8 of k copper line around to all torches and then usually it is 1/4 fitting yiu need and then silver solder a 1/2 by 1/4 inch reducer so you can hook up the the torches individually but make sure your regulator is sized correctly and that 5/8 copper is the proper size ...


2

Do you know the temperature of steam pipes? Do you know the ignition point of wood? Some say the "ignition" point of wood is 451 deg F. Most say around 570 deg F. Either way, the surface temperature of steam pipes will NEVER even get close to that. Typically upwards of 250 deg F. I think you can trust your plumber on this one.


1

The problem is in the street, or at least towards it, as Michael suggests. If you snaked it yourself I doubt it made it all the way to the street. If it was professionally snaked, start making phone calls to whoever did it and to the city. Jerseyville Sewage Plant. Call them and tell them your problem persists even after having your main line professionally ...


3

It really sounds like the drain line blockage is beyond the place where the basement drain exits the foundation and goes off to either the public sewer system or private septic system. Could be broken underground line, line filled in with tree roots seeking water through joints or holes in the piping, or sediment / deposits in the line that have restricted ...


0

Thanks DarthCaniac for the detailed answer!! However I didn't see your answer before because I needed to get this fixed right away, so I started on my own and yes that is exactly how I started, when I unscrewed the top tailpiece nut it did come out, however the bottom nut was like sealed maybe because it's been there for years, so I ended up break in half ...


1

In most US jurisdictions, from a legal perspective, the work in the basement would fall under the local building code and its permitting, licensing, and inspection requirements...e.g. a splinkler contractor could not run the pipes inside the house and a plumber would be required, building department fees would be applicable, etc. The pipe running through ...


0

Hot water line is closer to the (substitute "source of cold" for "outside wall" in my comment) than the cold water line, and freezes first. Mysterious water stoppages in cold weather are nearly always from pipes freezing. The fact that it's the hot water line does not mean that it's full of hot water - after it's sat for a few hours, it's cold, and if it's ...


0

Sharkbite fittings require a clean cut pipe end to install. You could try what I did last night with the same issue. I took off the tape dope and applied some white dope compound I had from back in the day. Comes in a small white tube at the big box stores. No leaks afterwards!


0

This sounds like you have an electrical system issue. It's not uncommon for building grounds to be bonded to cold water pipes. I ran into something a little similar in the past: How can I diagnose disturbing voltage potentials? I also once ran into an exactly similar thing at a job once where two electrical boxes held ~20 volts between them and sparked, ...


3

If you notice at the top, there is a handy dandy nut (if you will) that you can unscrew. Take that off, and you're half way to removing it. After that, you can unscrew the bottom of the p trap from the rest of the pipe. Next you will need a PVC P trap kit. Make sure you bring your old pipe to the hardware store and check that you get the correct size ...


2

Presumably the metal plumbing was your ONLY ground connection (from both the behavior and your description of the ground wire run.) You might want to have an electrician take a look at the system. In any case adding some driven ground rods tied into the grounding system would be a good idea.


0

Maybe you have the cold water in and hot water out lines reversed?


2

Sounds like you need to replace the mixing valve. This is a simple part to replace. This usually involves removing the handle and possibly the trim, then removing a retaining clip, and the pulling out the cartridge. Buy a new one and reverse the process. Here's a good set of instructions for Moen valves: ...


2

Moisture pooling in the joints like that suggests standing water in the pipe, which will eventually rust it out for sure. If this is the case, there's probably a blockage of some sort downstream that's resulting in sewage backup (ew). I would definitely address that first. After that, you can decide whether or not it's worth replacing pipe. My guess is that ...


0

Sounds like a drain pipe is clogged. The overflow hole is for overflow water to run into the drain pipe. If the water coming out of the overflow hole goes down the drain then I agree with the first poster, something is to hooked up incorrectly. If the water accumulates in the sink with the pop up open, then the drain is plugged.


3

Cast Iron drain pipe with Bell fittings, these are packed with oakum and overlaid with hot poured lead driven in place to seal and then a second layer poured in to complete the seal. It may only need the lead driven in to repack the oakum and a new layer of lead poured. Contact a plumber with knowledge about old drain systems, cast iron can take a long ...


1

HomeDepot carries a brand called "SharkBite" that are simple, push-to-connect fittings. You can buy a cap from them for cheap. It requires an equally inexpensive plastic tool to remove. That, or something like it, should get the job done. The cap: http://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBite-1-2-in-Brass-Push-Fit-End-Stop-U514LFA/202270531 The removal tool: ...


0

The expansion tank shouldn't be supported by the water heater to begin with. Install the flexible piping and support the expansion tank with some 2x4 bracing and a pipe strap.


3

...you have some of the best tap water in the country. Either remove it completely, or possibly use a carbon filter cartridge if there's enough chlorine to bother you. If the filter looks off, the filter housing probably needs a good cleaning/sanitizing. Which one (or how many) of the bottled water companies is just bottled NYC tap water?


1

I would recommend against using 2 wax rings due to the increased possibility of leaks. Short of hiring a plumber to raise the flange, there are products like this that allow you to raise the flange and still follow building codes.


0

It's not a bad idea to turn off the gas while you work on your water system as the water level inside the tank may become unacceptably low, or pressures to high if you shut all the valves off; triggering the T&P relief valve. You must turn off the gas or power if you have to drain the entire system and the tank.


2

Collapses are just one problem with clay sewers. Probably more common are roots clogging the pipe. If they do collapse, it can occur under your foundation slab, or out in your yard. Some 60 year old clay sewers might still be in great condition while others not so great. If you want to know the condition of yours then get a video inspection. Do you have a ...


0

In our neighborhood of 1950s houses, many of the cast concrete pipe sections are, and have been, collapsing—probably even ours. To shorten the time you pay this extra coverage, wait 4-5 months after coverage begins and when the soil is soft (Spring rain, thaw, or whatever), and then buy a truck load of barkdust, wood chips, sawdust, top soil, coal, or ...


3

The black collar seen on the bottom picture is what is keeping the faucet on. It is a plastic nut that screws on the threads you see to clamp the faucet onto the countertop. That is what you need to unscrew with the basin wrench (or any other that can reach).



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