New answers tagged

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There is an (exhaust) hose from the dishwasher to the garbage disposal in your sink. In many installations, that hose is just draped along the bottom of your sink cabinet. That positioning of the hose can let water siphon from the sink to the dishwasher. To stop that siphoning, just tie some part of the hose so that part is higher than the garbage ...


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You have a clog somewhere in your line. The first thing to do is check out your P-Trap because it's fairly easy and doesn't require any tools (assuming the nuts weren't tightened by Hercules). If that doesn't work then it's time for a snake. Snake by removing the trap and going in under the sink. Then you won't have to navigate the P-Trap and will have an ...


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The photos posted above were really helpful, since many people may not know what connectors and adapters are available -- as I didn't before replacing two vanities. Therefore, I thought I'd post photos of what I did and the components I used. The first thing to do is come out of the wall with a wall tube (otherwise known as a quarter-bend wall tube). Cut ...


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I had a similar problem -- I put in two tile showers, and I didn't want water to leak down behind the trim ring or even have steam from the shower get inside the wall. Considering how much labor we expend to prevent water from getting into the floor or walls of a tiled shower, it didn't make sense to me to leave a 6" diameter hole under the trim ring or one ...


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Alternate opinion here. People do not use hot water continuously. They have moments of activity when they shower, wash clothes or do dishes. The rest of the time, the water in the pipes cools off. You know the drill: How long the hot water takes to get hot, depends on the inventory (volume) of water in the pipe. Pipe volume is the square of diameter. ...


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I finished digging it up. It was just an oval piece of concrete (about 3 inch deep) that had the edges wrapped with metal. 0_0 so I guess trash is the closest answer. Wish I knew what it was t here for...it seemed deliberately placed.


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You are on the right track. Assuming you want to work on a single zone, you will need to: Shut off your boiler using the switch (potentially you could disconnect just one zone and leave your boiler running for the sake of other zones, but in general it's simpler to just turn off the system unless you're doing extensive work during the winter). Disconnect ...


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You can move the water heater to just about anywhere that would be convenient. However, it is not a good idea to reduce the size down from 3/4" to 1/2" directly off of the tank. You will likely run into issues with water pressure. In branch plumbing, it is best to keep the size of the pipe at its maximum until it branches off to a specific fixture. Most ...


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O.P. here. I found NPT sensors on ebay for $8 more than BSPP sensors. The amount of money to adapt BSPP to NPT would cost more. BSPP Sensor Method #1: Tee | SS304 | 1/2" x 1/2" x 1/2" NPT Female | ~$ 3.00 | Amazon Adapter | SS304 | 1/2" NPT Male -> 1/2" BSPP Male | $11.66 | Ebay Adapter | SS304 | 1/2" BSPP Female -> 1/4 BSPP Female |...


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I did this a while ago in my shower. I can't remember exactly, but that stem sticking out is part of a bigger cylinder/canister that fits inside of the big pipe. When I did it I worked the whole canister out of the pipe (it was stuck in there pretty good), took a look at it and played with it until I got the right rotation. Like Daniel suggests, you want to ...


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Turn off the main supply and connect the supply line(s) to the faucet. You will need a brass tee, crimps, and the connector for the pipe to the faucet, and some pipe. If you want to use a silcock instead of a sink, you still need to attach it to something. I would start there (build something to hold the silcock), and attach the pipe to it once I figured ...


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I am assuming this is a new issue on an old drain; it could be as simple as the sink drain itself is partially clogged. Try running a cable down and clearing the drain out. I am not sure that I understand the physics perfectly but have personally experienced this on more than one occasion. The partially clogged drain affects proper drain function and the ...


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I think what you've got is a blocked vent pipe, or worse, a non-existant or improperly-installed vent pipe. The vent pipe is supposed to connect to from the waste pipe stack or top of a lavatory drain pipe up through the roof, and is there to equalize plumbing system pressure and provide a means for sewer gas to escape. If the vent pipe is blocked, then the ...


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perhaps the float valve not closing properly in the tank? could be dirty. could be dried out/deformed sealing element. this will givve a better idea. assuming its over flowing... https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Toilet+Flush+Valve+Seal+Replacement/5794 or the valve that shuts the water off from filling the tank causing it to drain through the overflow tube ...


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The kitchen sink is not vented well enough. Does the sink have an air admittance valve? It could be clogged. Otherwise it is just poor venting design. My bathroom sink does the same thing every time the dishwasher dumps. It is not a major issue as long as you use the sink frequently it will refill the trap with water. Good luck!


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For the record, there ARE different threads. I just bought a new flange (only one type was available for sale in my neighbourhood) which did match the thread count on the existing drain shoe. Particularly annoying in that I was unable to purchase a new drain shoe. Actually, the drain shoe is what I was really trying to purchase as the existing one had ...


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An electricity meter can cause the low frequency hum, not all by itself, but it does in conjunction with the smart grid system. The smart grid system works from either RF frequencies or pulsing low frequencies on a two-way communication system--most likely this if you are in a suburb or rural area. You can shut off all the electricity at the breaker, but ...


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That's a typical monobloc tap (faucet) with a C-shaped washer and a retaining nut. You can cheaply buy special long tubular wrenches specifically designed for this job. Double ended - fits four different sizes. The connecting hoses usually have a small thread at the tap end with a rubber o-ring. They can often be unscrewed by hand once the lower end is ...


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I am an amateur but it looks to me like it just needs an O ring and new plastic ring like the video below shows. under kitchen sink diagram http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/how-to-repair-a-spray-hose-1.jpg looks like it needs an "O" ring and silicone grease. http://citykitchensseattle.com/tag/kitchen-faucets-leaking-at-base I had no experience at all and ...


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I've heard of using a layer of oil to prevent evaporation or discourage mosquitoes or things like that... but that requires levels be set so the oil stays above the pump inlet at all times, and it assumes that some loss of oil into the exhaust is OK (which is one reason it might need replacing). If the town said no, I'd say it's a reasonable position for ...


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you need whats called a braided hose adaptor. see pic attached.


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It has not been winterized properly. Enersol FAQs have some great tips regarding "removable end-caps on the roof" that need to be opened. EnerSol FAQs


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It depends on how much you want to spend, how old your water heater is and what kind of water you have. The aluminum rods are usually the cheapest followed by magnesium. The combination rods I don't have much faith in as the least noble metal is eaten away first. powered rods that will last a lifetime are very expensive due to the platinum wire used. Your ...


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James most of the Sinks and toilets in your home have 3/8 plumbing many homes are plumbed with 1/2 pipe through the entire house. The places you will see a pressure drop is usually hose bibs, showers and most kitchen faucets have water saving restrictors built into them. It all comes down to how many faucets will you have going at the same time and the size ...


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It sounds like he's telling you flat out, and in no uncertain terms, that this is a temporary hack. He is telling you the floor under the toilet has some serious problems. He is saying no one can fix the toilet properly without those floor repairs getting done. Using two wax rings is perfectly fine. He probably used two that fit well together. They ...


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The flange and accompanying bolts hold the toilet firmly to the floor and keeps the seal between the toilet and the floor. Without the flange or if it is broken, he would have to attach the toilet to the subfloor with wood screws, and if the floor is rotting out, those won't last long. Sounds like it will need further repairs sometime soon. Good luck!


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While you might be able to find an epoxy our something else out on the market your best option is replace the valve. If it was a failure in the casting process then you'll never be sure that another part of the valve won't fail. While it might be a pain it would be better to just replace it and have the peace of mind that you shouldn't have any future issues....


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I just double checked my state rules ,,, all over pressure / temp valves must vent/ exhaust outside a habitual space. If inside the house it needs to go out of the living space. in the garage I think it said 6" above the slab maybe 6' but it was allowed to vent on the slab.


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Generally water pressure must risen when you adopt from larger size to smaller diameter pipe.This is depend on length continued ,if is short adopt 1' or 2'" then you double the pressure and power spray ,but if go longer length and distribute to many branches then pressure will fail .in this case you need to create a lope return pipe in some section to the ...


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You have 3 or more options. #1 get a shark bite to go from galvanized to copper. #2 You need to go to a plumbing store and get a galvanized nipple and then extend your copper to the point the pipe screws into a coupling or other fitting. #3 If you don't want to extend your copper get an exact measurement and have a new piece of pipe cut and threaded. #1 is ...


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While it might not be allowed by code for new plumbing, you can use an S Trap. You will have to rebuild things to get things aligned correctly, but an S trap is exactly what you need if you are trying to get this going quickly and in a pinch. Just make sure the drain is vented after the trap in the crawlspace so the draining water does not siphon the ...


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IMO I would use something more robust like copper, galvanized, or brass from the meter to the shut off if exposed at all. Then use PEX after the shutoff. Just know PEX is not designed to be left exposed to UV light like the sun or physical abuse of any kind. If receives much of either, I would use another material or get it covered up. On that note, we ...


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You either dissemble it from its closest union, or start cutting. If it leads to a pump, I'd advise installing unions at both ends of it, to facilitate replacements. Simply tightening this pipe probably isn't the way to go. It's likely deteriorated at the threads and that's why it's leaking. You'll risk snapping it off in the fitting to get it watertight ...


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First off it kind of looks like the packing nut and associated seal that it squeezes against the valve stem is missing. You could look into whether you could locate that part off a replacement valve. The strange washer arrangement on your current valve handle suggests that it may not be the original type for this faucet. It may be that a previous owner tried ...


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If it is copper pipe and was indeed soldered (using a tin-lead alloy or a more modern lead-free solder), then propane should work okay. However, MAPP (originally methylacetylene-propadiene propane but now stabilized liquefied petroleum gas with propylene) will heat faster and, with a common sense caution, not melt the pipe. That is, don't heat the pipe ...


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MAPP gas is the way to go. It burns hotter, so It will heat the pipe faster. It will even heat the pipe if there's a bit of water in the line, something that propane will not do. If you're worried about burning surrounding materials, you can use a heat shield. There are all different types, sizes, and styles from many different manufacturers. This is ...


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i would say that regular propane gas,use flux,heat it evenly and the solder wil get to meltin and flow i have used it before and just make sure you stuff some light bread in the pipe to keep the water from dripping,since you already have the mapp dont get it to hot keep the flame a distance


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I had the same issue, whenever the water was on I had a whining noise throughout the house. I removed it, whining went away. Well now I'm having another issue where it feels like someone is banging on the side of my house, scares the crap out of me in the middle of the night. I'm assuming it's the water hammer thingy-my-jigy, so I'll have to go pick up a new ...


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Sounds like an anti-siphon reaction to me, full water pressure in the hose going to your roof, and the house water pressure temporarily drops from the large demand from those two zones until the sprinklers are fully charged. You can try adding an anti-siphon or backflow prevention valve on the faucet to verify (they make valves that screw on between the ...


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i would definitely try to just put a 3" inside closet flange on the existing pipe. it should be readily available http://www.homedepot.com/p/3-in-PVC-Adjustable-Metal-Ring-DWV-Closet-Flange-888-GPM/202274094 but if you cant find one... cut the joint at the 45 deg elbow where it meets the tee wye, but not at the actual joint. cut through the elbow itself ...


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you can just inject hydraulic cement into the void and let cure. then anchor your flange with a tapcon type screw. or just inject the hydraulic cement and then insert a screw into the wet cement. when it cures, it will lock the screw in place.


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One way you can fix it is by tapping in a 23mm socket into the drain. Then attach a ratchet to the socket and twist it out.


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You're going to have to put a trap in there somewhere. If there's enough space in the cabinet, you could do something similar to this... NOTE:: All horizontal pipe sloped at 1/4" per foot.* If not, and you have access to the plumbing below. You could reroute the plumbing, so the it comes up the back wall instead.


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Suggest you gently turn the 'packing nut' or 'gland nut' but only 1/16 of a turn at a time. I've seen this issue countless time with these valves - many of which are well over 30 or 40 years since originally built in the home. In all likelihood this will stpe the annoyuing slow leaking. If not, yes, close the valve fully, then remove the handle and the '...



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