New answers tagged

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I think you'd end up running into a whole boat load of issues before you could even begin talking about efficiency. The first and most pressing being the rapid condensation that would occur within seconds of circulating the cold liquid (leaving you with a whole host of other DIY problems you'd need to work out). Which, I imagine would need to be somewhere ...


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This is unconventional for a residence but it will work, although not quite as efficiently as the heating in winter. You will need a source of cool water. If you have an artesian spring on your property or a stream running through it, the project might be worthwhile. Otherwise you will need to install a chiller, and you may have trouble finding a HVAC ...


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Just had this same problem with irrigation in front yard. I can't think of its generic name but it's also called a nipple extractor. You can get a set at Lowes or Home Depot for 20-30. See YouTube video and how to do it: http://youtu.be/8Wns8rs1mVc


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Some people describe the smell of the additive that they put in natural gas as a "rotten eggs smell". I am not sure if they use such additive in natural gas in Italy but if so then you may want to consider that this smell is the accumulated gas from a gas leak someplace.


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OK for me this happened when replacing a cartridge on a moen kitchen sink faucet -- gushing water! Turns out that the instructions list the "alignment angle" as having one large hole at the top, and the two smaller holes at the bottom. But on my faucet it was the large hole at about 5 o'clock so I inserted it to match and voila, no leaks. That was scary ...


1

My suggestion is to dig it up from outside and work through the pipe from there over under the basement floor. If it is a simple blockage you should be able to get it from there. It is a collapsed red clay time then you can measure accurately so you will know more accurately where you may have to cut into the basement floor. If the blockage is tree root ...


1

That is commonly called a kitchen sink strainer or basket strainer. You should start by soaking the parts that you can see in the picture with a penetrating spray lube, the kind that says "helps loosen rusted parts". You will need to disconnect the plumbing from the strainer by removing both the metal and the plastic slip-joint nuts. Then remove the ...


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requested to make an answer: I believe you will find it is nickel plated brass, This is a common type of fitting and there would not be a problem. One of the largest problems for galvanic corrosion that I have seen is between copper and galvanized. A dielectric union helps but with a high mineral level in the water some corrosion can bee seen in just a few ...


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Both should be brass & be perfectly fine for a proper & normal water plumbing system that doesn't have any regular steel, iron or aluminum in its components or connecting components. Those materials have been specifically relegated to natural gas & propane plumbing due to their inabilities to play nice.


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The check valve may be sticking open, and only closing when a considerable backflow (from the pressure tank the pump just filled, towards the well) sets up after the pump shuts off (when it "slams" shut as sufficient flow unsticks the check.) Replacing the check valve should solve that issue, if that's the issue. It might also have a broken spring, and ...


0

Will the bath keep draining? It sounds like the pipe below the toilet,sink & tub are plugged. The other bathrooms are probably closer to the tank / city sewer so they work fine. A snake would probably clear the drain. I would go in at the sink trap as these are easy to remove unless there is a clean out close by.


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How can I get it to close fully? The plastic handle is expendable. It will break long before the valve spindle. This is good. I would use an indelible pen (sharpie) to mark the maximum angle it turns, then wiggle it back and forth vigorously a few hundred times and see if it is improving. If so - continue, if not - stop. The black tap handle is ...


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Turn off water supply to water heater, turn off (not pilot) gas to water heater. If the cold water shutoff to the heater is beyond the break, turn off the main water supply valve.


1

drywall should never, ever, ever be used for tile backer in a tub or shower, even if its water resistant. thats a cheat that always comes back to haunt you sooner or later. just pull it out, put up a vinyl membrane, 1/2 cement board and fiberglass lath and install your new tiles. we just finished a job where a customer had a bathroom that had been done ...


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If you're going to the trouble and expense of re-tiling the shower, removal of the existing drywall and tile is trivial. Also, a layer of tile isn't a proper moisture barrier anyway. I'd either seal the grout and use the shower as it is, or do it right and remove the existing.


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in some older homes, the sanitary sewer and stormwater drain lines are tied into one line out to the street mains. you could be hearing/seeing drainage water from your exterior foundation weeping tiles draining into the main drain. its often set up so that the basement floor drain acts as a vent, overflow and inspection point just upstream of where it ...


1

Maybe someone in your family flushed an object that jammed the pump. I would instruct everyone in the family not to flush anything other than toilet paper and human waste down the toilet in the basement. Especially if you are on a private septic tank system. Those pumps are pretty tough but can be clogged if you try hard enough. Continue to monitor the ...


3

The only real answer can be "as long as it takes". There are so many variables that affect how easily the water will evaporate that you can't predict. Could be hours in some situations, could be months in others. You need to figure out how to measure how much water is left. You might consider buying a moisture content meter; there are ones with pins that ...


3

You are experiencing a fairly normal event for a well with pump and pressure tank, though if the behavior seems new & different the pressure tank may require maintenance or repair/replacement. Most well pumps (there are exceptions, such as "constant pressure pumps") run on a simple differential pressure switch with a 20 PSI differential (often ...


0

I think the most likely cause is that waste water from the upper sink is being forced up into the vent pipe for the lower sink. The water descends without much restriction for about nine feet and accumulates enough kinetic energy to escape its intended path through the junction of the two drains. Some of it splashes into the lower drain and some into the ...


1

"Clear water iron" would be a search term to help you understand that side of the problem. While it can be treated, an acid neutralizer is not going to treat it - it needs to be oxidized (aeration/spray or chlorine are typical approaches) and then filtered out. An acid neutralizer (generally, no idea on your specific model) does pretty much what it says, ...


2

To clarify: about your statement that the catch basin should be for storm drains... yes- storm drains can use catch basins. But I'm pretty sure that in this case the sink water is draining into the city sewer. This was a regular design in Chicago, but I don't think it's common in the rest of the US. I think it's safe to say that the design is not popular ...


2

The point of that system was convenience. Plumbing was expensive and time-consuming 100 years ago. Whether it's common depends on the neighborhood and the city, of course. Whether it's acceptable now depends on your local ordinances. Most "gray water" is required to pass through an approved septic system. I'm surprised that local code doesn't require an ...


1

For common bathtubs the correct overflow gasket should be wedge shaped with a flat side and an angled side. The flat side mates with the overflow horn (the piece directly behind the hole) and the angled side mates with the backside of the tub, fat part down to match the slope of the tub wall. I have seen them made of both solid rubber and foam rubber. I ...


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The other answers are great, however can I add good old detective work using process of elimination and our friends trial and error. If it is only two drains, locate where they link together and do your best to hit that spot with a snake. If its every drain well hire someone to look at the main stack water flows down hill. Final thought maybe its ...


2

The following two techniques are perhaps not the best methods, but they're basically free, and don't require any tools. Pinpointing the blockage might not be realistic, and practice may be helpful. Using both techniqes might help get you within a foot of the obstruction. If the pipe is partially blocked (such that it will drain after a couple hours) the ...


0

I would replace the supply line with a flex line this will give you a new nut and seal and the flex ones don't have as many problems as the solid lines. These are cheap and easy to replace.


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Call a pro Call Roto-Rooter®, or any other plumber of your choice. They'll be able to feed a camera down the line, and tell you exactly where, and what the clog is. Even without a fancy camera, a plumber should be able to use a regular snake to locate the clog. Use a snake If you want to give it a try yourself, plumbing snakes (auger) are available at ...


1

This appears to be corrosion which is caused by the dissimilar metals. Installing a dielectric union between the two pipes should solve the issue. There already appears to be a union installed on the cold water supply line. Installing one of these unions should put an end to the corrosion you are seeing. They come in a variety of configurations. You will ...


1

Coteyr has the right idea, wrong pipe. The water supply pipe is constricted somewhere below both your apartments. Probably from scale buildup. His toilet's demand is causing a dramatic pressure drop, which is unseating your toilet's supply valve. It's running a little bit, and you're hearing that. It may be causing water to run out the tank overflow and ...


2

It's normal. Your "out pipe" and his share a connection. As the water rushes past your connection, suction is created, and a little water goes "out" your toilet. I would get one of those "refresh" kits that replace the flapper, just to be sure and call it done.


4

this looks like a chinese unit one of my granite suppliers used to use. they are the biggest piece of junk on the planet. if i remember correctly, the small screw in the middle acts as a retainer for the whole unit. you have unscrew it from above, and it holds the whole thing together. the problem we had was that the screw got locked into the metal ...


0

For half inch, the fitting itself takes a 3/4 wrench in the middle, and the tube takes a 5/8 wrench. I used a monkey wrench on the fitting, and a 5/8 wrench pushing on the plastic tool. I could have skipped the tool and used that wrench to push the release ring. I could do this by hand but with this set-up I could squeeze the two wrenches firmly together ...


0

The tube comes in through the fridge into the filter system pull the filter and one screw and the hole tube can be removed.


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in homes with lots of women, or men with long hair, this is a constant battle. the only way to prevent this is to put a hair catcher over your drain, but these are a nusiance. primarily the problem comes from hairs getting stuck at some bend or sticky area in a pipe, and this acts as a scaffold for more hairs to accrete and so on and so on. if you ...


0

It turns out the problem was not as bad as some had thought. It was a clogged drain pipe (black pipe in 2nd picture) and all I needed to do was remove it and unclog it. Apparently this is a very common problem. I found the answer here.


0

It sounds like the packing on a gate valve is failing. You can shutoff the water and attempt to repair these valves with new washers, cleaning the seat, and installing new packing material. However, the far more common approach now is to cut out the old valve and replace it with a 1/4 turn ball valve. These ball valves are much more reliable than the older ...


0

If it is an old valve, especially if it has seen many summer/winter cycles or if exposed to hot sun for long periods of time, I may be possible to replace the rubber seal parts inside the unit to stop the leaks. If you can get your hands on the proper parts this fix can take place fairly quickly. Some faucets or spigots do not lend themselves to easy parts ...


1

It sounds like the pipes below the kitchen / washer are starting to plug up. It would be a good time to run a snake down the line or have a plumber do it. It will get worse once this has started, if you have trees and a older house roots may be making there way into the drain lines and a cutter tip on a drain auger may be required. I mention this because I ...


2

If this happens just one or twice a few minutes after you've used the cold tap, it's more likely to be thermal expansion. Especially in the winter when the water arrives further below room temperature, or if you have a mixer tap. Some taps hold quite a lot of water, and the few percent thermal expansion from the incoming temperature to run temperature can ...


2

The seal in your faucet is failing, and water is building up very slowly. Surface tension keeps it in a shallow bubble until it finally flows out the horizontal faucet segment in a burst. Disassemble your faucet and check for mineral deposits and other debris. Clean or replace the ceramic or rubber seals, and lubricate rubber seals with white grease.


4

Shutoff the water supply to the dishwasher and run water through the sink drain from the faucet. If the flow of water stops to the dishwasher, then the problem is in the supply and Ed's advice is likely on track. If you find water filling the dishwasher with the supply turned off, then the problem is with the drain line. The drain needs to be attached to ...


1

I have had the same thing happen in the past. The fill valve on the back side of the unit where the water enters had a small chunk of scale / rust stuck in it. I was able to clean it out and it worked fine for a long time after that. (if there is no filter / screen on the hose fitting you will probably want to add one so once you get it working it wont ...


0

Were this my project I'd cut off the fitting flush with the floor and find out exactly how close to normally the flange fits. The inside of elbow should be the same size as the inside of the pipe. If possible, I'd make slight adjustments to the flange by sanding or grinding, then glue it in using primer and PVC adhesive. I'd then be sure to securely anchor ...


1

It's actually a Danze. I had to replace mine as my hot water would not shut off. After alot of investigating and calling different suppliers ex: Moen and Delta, I was directed to Danze 1-800-487-8372. I sent them a picture of the cartridge and it was theirs.


-1

Copper piping has been around for at least 60 years and the only time you get pinholes in copper is because you probably used the wrong thickness of copper. If a solder joint is properly soldered then it will never leak. Ive been working on domestic hot water systems of every size for over 40 years and have never had any build up of any kind on the inside of ...


2

The drain valve could be sticking. There is usually a solenoid that opens the drain valve at the end of the cycle and the water is pumped out instead of circulating. If the solenoid or the valve is malfunctioning then water could be left after the cycle or the dishwasher doesn't fill as far as it should. Experiment some more but it sounds like a repair is ...


1

The most common names are sillcock, spigot, and hose faucet.


1

It's a typical Exterior Faucet Handle like these. This one happens to be Cello brand, but there's nothing special about it. That might not even be the original handle ;-) They tend to be pretty consistently standardized, so you should be able to use just about any kind of exterior faucet handle you can find. This is what it looks like when it's off: As ...


7

This sounds like the backwash on your water softener. It should be set to cycle at 1 am or so when you wouldn't hear it, but the clock could have been reset from a power outage. Normally, it will trickle for 20-30 minutes as it brines the resin bed and then it will backwash the resin bed with clean water for 10 mins or so. This water must all be dumped to ...



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