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5

Probably a charcoal filter. Probably disgusting (people put them in, change the filter a few times, and then get bored of buying the filters, which turn into a gross mess as often as not.) Or the filters become unavailable since these are not exactly a standard item. I'd strongly suggest removing it; if you want to keep it and can find filters for it, at ...


1

I don't know if this will work in your situation, but I have a mobile home with very hard well water, and no room for a water softener. The water lines are plastic tubing with some brass shutoff valves. When a toilet or faucet became clogged, I would just turn off and remove the supply line to the fixture and squirt it into a bucket. If that didn't clear it, ...


0

If you already have water hammer arrestors (you probably do, since this is the only tap that hammers), you'll need to turn off the water supply and drain the system to the lowest point in the system. You'll need to leave that drain point open for quite a while, depending upon the arrestors you have. When it's fully drained & the arrestors are all full of ...


0

If your bathroom faucets are single lever, you are probably opening both the hot and cold valves, which is allowing cold water to pass into the hot supply side since both connect to the spout. If your kitchen sink has two separate valves, you'll get the same result by opening both the hot and cold valves at the same time.


0

Many faucets do not have integral check valves and will allow water to pass from the hot into the cold and vice versa. Typical this isn't an issue as there is pressure on both sides. How much water comes out of the washing machine faucet? If it's just a little sputtering, then it could simply be some water passing through the bathroom faucet back into the ...


0

Try to scrape/sand away the paint to see what material you find. As mentioned in @Pigrew's answer it could be black iron steel, galvanized steel, or brass. However, it's hard to tell by the photo if it is a threaded cap or not. If it's not threaded it could be copper, which is used for both water and gas. And for the sake of completeness, it could also be ...


4

Short of opening up the end-cap, there isn't a good way to tell which it is. You could try banging/hitting a pipe elsewhere in the house, to see if you can hear the banging. Also, look at other exposed piping to see what materials were used for the various utilities. Pipe like that could be water, but it also could be oil or natural gas. There is a chance ...


0

There is no specific torque or other fixed installation technique. Use tape dope, tighten to hand tight, 2-3 more turns and leak test the bloody thing.


1

If by "bar-sink drain cover" you mean a perforated strainer like this: then it might be related to the relative "softness" or "hardness" of your water supply. Where I am from we have "hard" water (high in mineral content) which has high surface tension and will not drain as easily through fine strainers. "Soft" water has less or no dissolved minerals but ...


1

The only time I ran into something similar it was due to a failed anti-sweat mixing valve on a toilet that allowed back-flow through the hot water pipes. That would also explain in your case why the kitchen sink doesn't seem to be effected by the issue. About the only way I can think of to test this theory (without opening walls) would be if you can cut ...


2

The accepted answer is the correct way to fix the problem. However, if there's a valve that's too corroded to turn the nut, or that isn't fixed by that solution, you can give this a try. It's not a good solution, but it works in a pinch :) A common practice when this type of leak happens is to simply open the valve all the way, except more so. In other ...


5

Try tightening the packing nut (the hex part the stem goes through) a little. That's what it's for. Don't overdo it. The "packing" is the material that seals around the stem - the packing nut compresses that material. On a valve that is not used often, actuating the valve does commonly cause it to leak, as things have "set." Tighten a little, wait, tighten a ...


0

I think your largest problem is too-thick (old, perhaps?) cement... although I've never seen such a nasty glop inside any PVC (or CPVC) pipe joint of any size. Nobody seems to have asked whether you ream, as well as deburr, your pipe before glueing... but I cannot think that failure to ream would cause a problem like this. You're using real "PVC cement" ...


0

You should contact your local government, as codes and laws vary from place to place. The Uniform Plumbing Code, says that there should be valves for every fixture in the unit. Uniform Plumbing Code 2012 Chapter 6 Water Supply and Distribution Section 606 Valves 606.3 In multidwelling units, one or more shutoff valves shall be provided in ...


0

They are designed that way to save water. The idea is that you give it a quick flush for a pee and a long flush to remove solids. The problem is that people don't know that so they give it a quick flush and it doesn't clear the pan so they give it another flush.


1

Yep. You can buy rubber "test plugs" of the appropriate size. They look like this one sold by Zoro Tools:


3

Sounds like the chain is too short. The flapper has to come up past vertical, so that it's out of the way for the full flush. Once the tank starts to fill again, the flapper will slam shut. If the chain is too long, it won't lift the flapper enough. If the chain is too short, it won't let the flapper fall into the full open position. The chain has to be ...


1

If you don't use it why replace it? Just remove it and put a standard drain in.


1

There are a lot of buildings that have this situation where people may be condo or townhouse owners. The normal thing to do in your situation would be to upgrade your shut-off valve. Maybe even install another one right before/after your first opening on the mainline.


1

Most Moen products have a lifetime limited warranty. That's why I agree with their slogan (at least the second part): buy it for looks, buy it for life.


0

I can't say I disagree with the other two answers here but in the intereset of exploring all options, try spraying half a can of CorrosionX (or any descent penetrating lubricant spray) down there, let it sit for an hour or two, and then crank it a few revolutions with your allen wrench and see if it breaks up the corrosion. I don't hold out a lot of hope for ...


0

DEFINITELY replace it. If you have some extra time on your hands, take this one and fiddle with it until you get it into nice shape again... then keep it for a spare.


0

May I ask you to temper or clarify one adjective? Is this water literally BOILING hot (hotter than the tanks) or only SCALDING hot (as hot as the tanks, about 120*F)? If the tanks are also used for heating, then perhaps 180*F? If the tanks are used both for heating and domestic hot water, then you have several large tempering valves, correct? These ...


3

Replace the thing. New ones are not excessively expensive. Attempts at repair are likely to be a futile exercise. The reason is that old disposers often corrode right through the lower portion of the casing and there really is no good way to repair that.


2

There are two main factors that determine what is used: Code requirements (as well as the project's specifications) Cost ABS and PVC are the cheapest, however there can be limitations with their use in larger buildings due to fire code requirements. Where fire codes requirements limit the use of plastics, either cast-iron or DWV copper is used for the ...


0

You know that there are compression shut-offs that don't spin? They are sold usually by toilet repair and normal shutoffs at big box store. Just get the right thing.


1

Epoxy. Really. Epoxy the fitting right to the pipe.


0

It depends on the type of caulk you're using. If you've already selected and purchased the caulk, check the directions on the tube. If you're still in the process of deciding what you want to use, there are a few different factors such as type, full cure time, and "shower ready" time. GE makes a version of its Silicone II caulk that is "30 minute shower ...


1

That looks perfectly suitable. One additional thing you should be aware of, though - if your existing plumbing contains any yellow brass fittings, they really need to come out because of a chemical quirk of PEX; the zinc gets leached out of yellow brass, leaving behind only soft copper, and the fittings may either leak or plug solid. You can use RED brass, ...


0

It CAN be done internally. Genova makes a very clever little diaphragm vent that glues right into PVC drain/soil pipe. It should not be installed in an inaccessible location, since it may possibly need periodic maintenance and if it fails, you wouldn't want a methane buildup inside your walls or anywhere else in the house... so it must be exposed.


1

The problem here was using the right search terms. Based on Tester101's comment I tried some additional terms, especially "flare". Although I did not originally want a flare cap, it helped improve the search results enormously so I was able to find the right kind of suppies and narrow down to something that would work. Ultimately I got this: 5/16 Brass SAE ...


2

I would use a non-return valve Diameter: 0.75 in Maximum Bar Pressure: 16 bar Type: Non-Return Colour: Black-Grey Material: PVC Ideally used for conveying water and other fluids in urban and inter-urban infrastructure, industrial, mining, landscape, and farming applications Note: This one seems expensive, I suspect I can buy about ten ...


2

For drainage, you can use a mechanical gear type coupling such as a fernco coupling: You can slide it over the pipe you're installing, and then once the pipe is in place, slide it back over the joint and tighten the gear clamps.


0

It makes absolutely NO difference. Even if the water pipes broke and flooded the stud bay the cable would not typically be damaged or harmed. NOR would it"short out" even in the slightest, even if it got into a device box. Worrying about having electric and plumbing in the wall together is tantamount to worrying about having gas in the gas tank of your car ...


0

I would think in a perfect world I would always have electric above plumbing so that if you have any floods or leaks that there isn't a short. The chances of it mattering are almost zero since electric is insulated. The water would basically have to come in around the outlet. Since you cannot always pick the height of your outlet (you won't have normal ...


1

Could it be an airlock? Try opening all the taps in the house until they all run freely. (possibly not all the way, as overwhelming the incoming supply would be counterproductive). Do you know what sort of water layout you have? As you are referring to "taps" then I would guess a typical UK layout with a cold-water header tank that feeds the hot system ...


2

The plumber's putty will not work, pull it all out of there please. The pop-up assy. should have included a fairly thick tapered rubber gasket to seal against the underside of the drain hole. This gasket has a flat back for the "crappy plastic" washers to rest against, those are actually friction rings designed to let the nut spin freely and press up against ...


2

Odds seem high that you didn't actually turn the water back on correctly, since the taps in the bath were what you worked on and the kitchen now doesn't get water which cannot be caused by the bath taps - but can be caused by not opening valves after closing them to work on the bath taps. Impossible to provide any more specific hint from afar, but follow the ...


1

I agree that taking it apart is the best way to thoroughly clean it. If it hasn't been open in a while, you might need to put some muscle into it. Drano sells a kit that comes with a drain snake, which can help break up the plug and pull it out. That is much more effective than a liquid alone.


0

Thats right. You need air in the tank. OR the bladder has ruptured. Either way you need air in the tank, and likely need to put more air in about twice a year until you replace the P tank.


1

You should (as per comments) verify that the pipe is even leaking. If it's not, you can do all this work and still have water entering the basement. It may be a lot simpler ("slow leak") to simply arrange a nice ditch ("dirt basement") to direct the water to a convenient exit point. You should make a serious effort to accurately measure the 2" long stub of ...


2

I think new sink drainpipes are almost all PVC. I recently replaced a corroded metal kitchen sink pipe with PVC, but in the store I noticed that metal downpipes are still available. In theory PVC should be more resistant to chemicals and rust while metal is more resistant to heat. But most drain cleaners don't contain lye any more and nobody in their ...


3

According to the International Plumbing Code, the length between a toilet (water closet) trap and the vent is unlimited. Which means if you're only installing a toilet, you don't need a vent. International Plumbing Code 2012 Chapter 9 Vents Section 909 Fixture Vents 909.1 Distance of trap from vent. Each fixture trap shall have a ...


1

I do not think it would be a good idea to double up on the clamps. When you are clamping PEX onto a fitting, you want to try to get the clamp near the middle of the fitting, ideally between two ribs. With two clamps, it wouldn't be possible to do this. To ease your trepidation about the staying power of the clamps, do a test clamp on a fitting. Let it ...


1

I know that you said you cannot get the cleanout plug - but this is your best bet at removing large debris. Try: Wrap a small towel over the plug and turn counter clock wise ("Righty tighty, lefty loosy") Use an adjustable wrench to break the cleanout plug free If the above attempts do not work or you have already done that route: Use a drain snake to ...


2

That looks like a standard '3/8 compression x 1/2" MIP' (male iron pipe) connector. You can get it at any hardware store. Normal procedure is to cut the tubing above the fitting and install a new one. Your tubing does not look too good, you have to have fairly smooth tubing surface for the new compression fitting to be able to slide on and seal. You may ...


2

Overall, your plan to run PEX inside the HDPE and connecting them is acceptable. However, I would not try to jury-rig fittings together. It sounds like you are trying to find a fitting designed for PEX that just happens to "fit" the HDPE, or vice-versa. This is a recipe for mechanical failure. After putting in all this work, the last thing you will want to ...


0

Good advice already! If you're really a novice, take some more pictures of the pipes and go to the hardware store and ask the guy. Usually a smaller hardware store with an older guy working there is best, and look at the new parts. He will show you how it goes together. See if you have a large pair of slip joint pliers (channellocks). Sometimes you need 2. ...


1

First, do not attempt to break the brick into any more pieces, should you succeed these pieces may get lodged further down the pipe making it that much more complicated (and expensive) to resolve. Unfortunately the only solution will be to cut the section of pipe that the brick is stuck in and remove it. Call a plumber: it already sounds like you are in ...


0

Drain lines are pretty easy to work with. If you are completely unfamiliar but want to do it yourself I would recommend removing all the drain line you can, ideally all the way from the sink to the wall. If you want to do less of it, remove the portion you plan to replace and leave the rest hanging. Once removed bring the stuff to your local hardware/big ...



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