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0

Easy fix, if it is water hammer, is to install a water hammer stub -- just a capped pipe on a T downstream of your boiler. If that doesn't fix it no harm done. You should also ensure that you have an expansion tank in the system. You'll need to check your boiler manual to determine if it has a backflow check valve, in which case the expansion tank also ...


2

If you have sufficient ceiling height, you could consider laying a new floor over the existing floor. I'm assuming that since the bungalow needs refurbishing, then there is unlikely to be any (or at least sufficient) insulation under the existing slab, so you'd need to insulate under any new underfloor heating - no point having the sub-floor sucking half of ...


0

I'm not an expert and I'm only guessing based on too many hours of This Old House, but the fact that it "jumps" suggests that there's a mechanical issue. Inside that thing is a pressure balancing valve that keeps you from getting scalded when someone causes cold water pressure to drop by flushing a toilet or something similar. My guess is that the do-hickey ...


0

You say you are on the third floor but do not say whether or not there are floors above you. If there are, and this began while you were not running water, then I agree that this is probably a building issue rather than a local clog.


2

Those are simple "slip-joint" connections. Judging from the angle of the lower pipe assembly (the tee, and trap parts) it appears that you may have a loose connection downstream at the wall as well, or it would not have swiveled down and away like the picture shows. You can fix this yourself. Unscrew the nut at the top of the tee, there will be a plastic ...


1

In 1987 we were still using acid flux, there was also no requirement to ream cut pipe ends. In addition, domestic (U.S.) production of copper had dropped precipitously and the demand was being met with foreign copper products with dubious quality control specs. All those things have contributed to frequent failure of copper water pipe and connections from ...


1

Sometimes centrifugal pumps (those with a spinning impeller) will cavitate when there is a discharge path too big to supply back pressure, and/or if there is not enough suction pressure. Cavitation will result in low or no flow, and will usually be accompanied by pump noise. You may be operating the pump outside of it's design parameters (pump curve). See ...


2

Iron or copper pipe? Corrosion inside metal pipes forms craters that eventually open a pinhole and as the metal erodes due to corrosion compromise and water flow, they get larger. From experience, if you have one pinhole, you have several incipient corrosion craters that will eventually leak elsewhere in the segment. You can patch them one at a time for ...


1

The water company charges you based on the amount of water that flows through the water meter. The water meter doesn't know which valves are open or closed, it only knows that water is flowing through it. Most places I've lived, bill based on cubic feet of water used (1 cubic foot of water = 7.48 gallons). There's also commonly a sewer charge if you're on ...


1

Your pressure drop issue is really a problem with flow capacity. You will not be changing or improving the flow capacity of your main house's plumbing system by tying in that 1/2" line from the guest house and will likely see zero improvement by doing so. You would be better off trying other things: Install low-flow water saving shower heads (this will help ...


0

Your picture shows parts that are for a knob style handle. You say you changed to a lever handle which should use a cam with a rounded triangular hole rather than the pictured "slot style" cam. Also, the ball for lever handles is different than that for knobs. It has a slot in the side of the ball that engages with a small pin which protrudes from the right ...


1

I am sure that this can be fixed with a thread locker material. There are products available that can be placed onto threads before assembly and then will cure into a very tight joint to keep the threaded fasteners from coming loose. You can get this at almost any auto parts store. Ask them for "loctite" thread locker. Before trying to use it clean out ...


0

Although not directly answering about the sharkbite I have used compression fittings on 1/2 inch of exposed copper (actually from where our copper piping was stolen out of the walls) with success. They aren't the best long term solution but they will get you by.


0

One of my children stuffed a bunch of peanuts down the overflow drain of our bathroom sink. I was able to get it out with a wet dry vac, some wire to poke the stuff through and a lot of patience.


2

EPA discussion of waste treatment with lime One common sanitizer for sewage is lime. A farm supply would have it. You must layer the dirt and the lime, a 1:10 ratio (1 inch of lime to 10" of dirt) Care must be used against touching or breathing the lime directly. Hydrating and mixing each layer (or lift) will ensure the dispersal and neutralizing the ...


0

No you need at least 1in to have it properly fit and seal.


0

I have strong reservations about the integrity of both types. I have two leaks after 8 years of service with the stainless steel clamps. My colleague at work has had three leaks in as many months, one causing extensive damage and mold abatement for which the insurance folks are required to make you leave and stay in a hotel room (with 4 boys). Both homes are ...


1

Your inspector should be able to grant a waiver for existing conditions if code compliance is a concern. If that is the case, I would wait and ask him/her for a solution that is acceptable. Hopefully something a bit shy of bumping the basement wall out 6", LOL. You could put the 1/2" foam behind, than cover the pipes with split foam pipe insulation. I try ...


0

Since all the obvious technical solutions have been provided and are excellent answers, however the obvious has been missed: If this is a new toilet, check to see if it is "Eco-friendly". These new toilets have less water in the tank thus less force to push the waste down. If you are used to an older toilet, this could very well be the culprit - especially ...


1

Cut the foam into manageable pieces and slide into place. Use cans of spray foam insulation to fill the cracks in the sheets of foam caused by cutting. Or spray foam the entire cavity and forget the rigid foam.


0

I had this embarrassing problem the plumber took the toilet out and thoroughly checked everything, the answer was hard water, it had formed into chunks like a grey cement, after removing all that and flushed it through he fitted a new dual flush as well, the other one the plastic had split. Now all is well the family and visitors are happy.


5

No. You will need about 1 inch. It will hit the stop at about 1 inch and slightly (very slightly) pull out after it hits the stop. This is something that you don't want to mess with because if you don't have the correct length the bite action won't take. Good thing is unlike a bad solder job on copper you will notice that you didn't hit the stop right ...


1

Given multiple issues there, I think the correct and possibly simplest, albeit messy, solutiion is going to be cutting the floor open and putting the pipes where you need them. Concrete is not forever.


1

If the hot water is hooked up to your faucets, then hot water should eventually come out regardless of the re-circulation stuff. That is, unless the check valve is the wrong way or the pump isn't letting water flow. Then you would just get cold water. EDIT I see from your comment that the system was previously working and no work has been done. The check ...


0

I have the same problem with my brand new Whirlpool dishwasher and I think it has to do with the dirty water not draining all the way because when I take that filter out there is water down in there and the filter has that sour/ dirty smell to it. I have just called Whirlpool for a technician to come out since it's still under warranty. Now, I hope they ...


0

Don't install the water softener in a place that you cannot guarantee will be above freezing. If it freezes, than many internal components will be damaged. You could insulate and install an electrical heater in the shed, but it would be the first part of the house to freeze if your house looses electricity. Conversely, most water softeners use electronics ...


4

Your external list is pretty good, what's missing is an internal list: water shut off valves(stem leaks) Connections between stop valves and mixing valve Stem leaks on mixing valve Shower arm and tub outlet extension: leaks at elbow inside wall It is unusual for these sources to end up on the floor, outside the tub, unless your bath is over a slab. ...


3

Just resealing everything is a bad idea because you might, for example, just trap the leaking water somewhere you can't see it. The water will still leak and cause damage or mold. You really need to find out where the water is coming from. Turn on the shower and sit outside of it to find the leak.


0

Yes, this is fine. However, you still want to mount the fan as high as possible to maximize the effectiveness of extracting the warm, moist air. To make installation easier, get a unit rated for wall installation and run the vent straight down to the basement. Also, minimize the number of bends/elbows; ideally only one will be needed.


1

I had the exact same problem under my bathroom sink. Here's a picture of how I resolved it. The first elbow off the sink is 1.5" because I couldn't find a 1.25" female-to-female elbow in my local Home Depot. I used a 1.25" sized compression washer in the larger elbow to get the smaller 1.25" elbow to fit snugly. Works great! You should be able to do the same ...


-1

Mine are perfectly square and painted black. I have one which protects the water heater and one on the other side protecting the furnace. I am sure code requires them, as I do not believe a builder would add anything that is not required. Just slap some paint on it to make it a bit more aesthetically pleasing.


1

I suspect the sound is from the drain pipes, and comes from a leaky toilet, beacause that's the most common thing that has a stored reservoir of water to keep leaking after you shut off the main valve. You might try leaving the main water valve shut off for several hours. If the sound eventually stops, go around and look in your toilets to see if any are ...


1

Despite being a different brand, the outgoing washer used the same inlet valve assembly. I was able to swap the parts, and the stripped inlet is going to the metal recycling center with the old washer.


7

If you look at the picture below you will see pex tubing. This has become the industry norm in some areas of the US - I know some countries have adopted similar things and some haven't. The compression fittings are supposedly made to last longer than than a soldered copper joints - jury is still out on that. Let's see what complaints there are in 10-20 ...


0

I had this problem. My pipes started making a very loud banging. I tried the drain the lines trick but it didn't help. I then put a water pressure gauge on my faucet and found my water pressure to be up over 100psi. I followed the steps for reducing the water pressure on the water pressure reducing value but then noticed that after running the water for ...


0

@keshlam's answer is the proper way to go about it, but might be more permanent than it needs to be. An easier and cheaper approach would be to slip an extension tube inside the existing standpipe. From the photo, it is not clear if that is 2 inch or 1.5 inch pipe. Look for an extension pipe of 1.5 or 1.25 inches, respectively, to slide inside it and ...


2

That should be easy. Start by figuring out how much additional height you need. Use a pipe wrench to loosen the faceted collar at the top of the trap, and the standpipe should just pull up and out of that fitting. Take it to a store and tell them you need a piece the same size but however-much longer. You may have to get something a bit longer than that and ...


0

Well... since nobody responded. I used 2 10' straight pipes as well as a 10' of soft copper tubing, and a bunch of couplers and 45 degree elbows. I used copper clips and masonry screws to attach the pipe to the wall and to the upper hanger, and used sweated joints througout. Was much slower than using PEX!


1

I wouldn't bother unless you're going to have your water turned off for a couple days. In that case, turn off the water heater itself. You'll have a hard time using any hot water with the main turned off, so it is mainly a consideration of whether or not it's worth it to keep the water in the tank hot over the period you won't be using it.


0

"PIG" the line as in the answer to this question How do I remove a wiffle ball from a pool vacuum pipe? Or run a hose from the other end with an expandable bladder. The bladder fills with water and seals such that water only flows one way. Look in the plumbing section.


0

Cant hurt the heater at all and no need to shut gas or electricity off to the HWS either as it's always full and only delivers you hot water by way of you opening hot tap and cold water entering bottom of tank forcing hot out. While you have hot water turned off why dont you replace the shower washer too? You can find out how simple to do on utube.


0

You should not add an upward bend to the pipe, as that will more likely lead to water always sitting in the pipe. Instead you should add a check valve (one way valve) to the line. This will allow the pump to push water out, while preventing ditch water from flowing back in. If the pump is strong enough, it should be able to push water into the ditch even ...


0

If the rise on the pump is enough for the additional height of the J, I would think it would be enough to pump despite back-pressure from whatever water is in the ditch... but I may be wrong about that. So you might need a more powerful pump even with the extension. This sounds to me like the first step should be to make sure the property is graded so water ...


1

From personal experience my husband and I made the mistake of installing a new washing machine in our 2nd floor laundry room without properly placing a pan underneath the machine. We were thinking it was new so there was no chance of it leaking s at least not for a long time. Boy were we wrong! Three days later, a disaster filled the laundry room floor, out ...


1

You could just leave it alone... I got fined $1500, and had to dig it up and replace it... for cutting mine down below 42 inches.


0

Could be a clump of solder is in the pipe. I had the same problem recently and ran the shower for a while without the shower head. I never found anything but the problem went away. Maybe it was a glob of flux that finally dissolved.


6

What you have is not solid. There's a foam or cellular interior to the pipe with two thin layers of sold ABS on the outside. It costs less and weighs less than solid pipe. Thus it's popular at home stores that compete on price. Not every jurisdiction allows use of cellular pipe. However it's common in the USA. You need to be careful about backfilling ...



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