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7

In the UK (where question poster is located), there are several distinct types of plastic push-fit connectors. You can get specialized tools to help undo each type. John Guest Speedfit Wavin Hep2O Floplast Flo-Fit etc Yours are Hep2o and can be released with a Hepkey - there is a tool selection guide. Hep2O Speedfit FloPlast


6

Why do you need to replace the stud? Unless it has rotted, you do not need to replace a stud with water damage. Removed the damaged drywall and any other wet items and let the wood dry out before replacing the drywall. If this is inside the bathroom, be sure you are using the right type of product. You would not use regular drywall in a shower or bath ...


5

You should take a sample of the water to a lab for analysis if you're really concerned. There are minerals that fluoresce under UV light, so it could be that and not bacteria. But I doubt that anyone other than a lab will be able to offer more than speculation on the matter.


5

I agree with the comment in that its surprising the copper pipe would conduct enough heat to freeze the downstream pipe, are you sure there's not a draft or something like that? Your idea to isolate the pipe seems relatively sound though. You would likely want to use PEX instead of PVC. PEX normally requires a special tool to crimp the connectors, so I ...


5

That appears to be the regeneration controller for a water softening system. You can't get rid of it because all water softener systems need to be periodically regenerated (which basically amounts to flushing the system with water to carry away the absorbed minerals) to allow them to continue working.


5

It is a Water Softener. The clear hose on the right side that goes down should go to a brine tank. The Brine tank should have water and salt in it. There are instructions on the front of the panel for setting up the regen and triggering a manual regen cycle. It is worth keeping the system. Water Sofeners eliminate Calcium and Magnesium from your water. ...


4

First you need to cut the PEX tubing at the access spot. That can be done with a PEX tubing cutter. Then you acquire the correct type fitting (your size requirement may differ from picture) to rejoin the cut PEX with "T" fitting and a branch connection for an added PEX tubing to go off toward the ice maker. It is also necessary to install an inline ...


3

Many push-fit fittings are not designed to be removable. If that were a sharkbite connector, you get get a special removal tool. How do I disconnect SharkBite push-fit fittings? The only way to disconnect the SharkBite push-fit fitting is with a SharkBite Disconnection Clip or SharkBite Disconnection Tongs. With the clip or tongs apply pressure ...


3

You should make two phone calls. The first to your local building department, which should be able to answer all your code related questions. They may even have a handout or other documentation, that outlines the requirements of replacing a water heater. The second call should be to a local Rheem dealer, or directly to Rheem. They will be able to answer ...


3

Your pictures are showing that it will be necessary to remove the existing drain lines up to the place where there is free pipe to cut into thus allow gluing in a new coupling. It will unlikely for there to be a decent way to fix this by any other means. Any type of cobbled together "fix" is always going to be a potential weak spot in the system ripe for ...


2

This doesn’t look like corrosion, primarily, but like buildup of minerals from small leaks. The valve’s thread may not have been sealed properly (or not been tightened correctly), hard to say under the buildup. The weld seems to be leaking a tiny bit – you could clean it with steel wool and put some talcum on it for easier observation. JFTR, I agree that ...


2

If I am interpreting the pictures correctly, I think the white plastic piece that sits inside is the limiter. Carefully remove the U-shaped locking piece, taking care not to damage the piece slide the white piece out some and turn it counter clockwise slightly and re-set it. Lock it back in place, and test the water max temperature again.


2

It can backflow if you lose pressure. Perhaps from a power outage, or if you draw water faster than the pump can replenish it. Backflow valves (check valves) are pretty cheap (about $5 - $10). If the consequences are as severe as you make them out to be, I'd put one in. Also I would add a carbon filter after the RO system, that would remove ammonia and ...


2

This symptom is common with external sprayers. The diverter causes water to shutoff from the faucet when the sprayer is in use. The external sprayer may be leaking (into the sink, or under it) or the diverter valve itself may be failing. If you have a sprayer, check both ends of the hose for leaks and fix that if you find any. If not, remove the valve and ...


2

Can you make this adapter work? This one converts a male 1/2 inch thread to an M22 size. You can see it for sale at this web site.


2

I am in Portland too. Hardly anyone uses cast iron pipe anymore, so there is little demand for it. Possibly you could donate it to the Rebuilding Center (on N. Mississippi) and take a tax deduction for it. Otherwise, it is scrap cast iron. There is wide variation of pricing between scrap buyers. Bulk prices nationwide are estimated at $205 to $235 per ...


2

Another option would be to install a flow-through trap primer. This is a device that feeds a small amount of water to the trap primer everytime the supply it is connected to runs. One constraint is that it needs to be oriented correctly due to the air gap. The one pictured is from Watts Series A200 Flow-Through Trap Primers are used in commercial and ...


2

How big is your hot water tank, and how high is the thermostat set? It sounds like you're running out of hot water, so you have to keep turning up the valve so the (now cooler) hot water can compensate


2

It's clogged. Hire a plumber to snake it, or buy a snake and do it yourself. A simple drill mounted snake (about $10-$15) should do it. If you've never done it before watch some youtube videos explaining how first. It's probably full of hair. Once you clear it make a point of periodically (every 6 months or so) taking off the drain cover in the shower and ...


2

All too often these things are not installed with serviceability in mind - meaning you rip open the ceiling or floor when you do need to service them. Usually the ceiling is less trouble. Evidently that might be a once in a century operation, if this is the first time it's needed to be serviced...but it still makes me curse whoever entombed it and didn't ...


2

The best recommendation when you cannot get any satisfaction from the building owner / manager is to MOVE to another place. When you rent it is not your place to be doing things like getting in a professional to work on things like the plumbing. If you do get ready to move now you know some more what to be looking for and asking questions about before you ...


1

An Approved location that I'm aware of is like a Floor Drain. Though Ariel is Correct, you would need an Air Gap. So the pipe would have a 1" min Gap to the Drain so that any back flow of water could not touch the exit pipe. The Main issue here is keeping the sewer gases in the system and not outside. This is what the p-Trap is for. Its a water barrier to ...


1

The slow type of leak that you are experiencing can have been caused by one of the following: If the end of the copper pipe had some surface scratches, denting or had been squashed out of round. It would be recommended to inspect the copper pipe surface to ensure that it is clean, round and scratch free. This is really important because the special O-ring ...


1

This is what I ended up doing after some research and opinion asking: Chisel all the loose concrete edges so there is an undercut. This prevents the patch in the slab from rising. Backfill with sand. As you put the sand in moisten it and tamp it down. Make sure the piping is well supported and that the closet flange is level. Keep adding sand until it ...


1

Are you sure its a scale build-up. Just a few things to note. Here is just a shortlist of things to try first: Make sure that your water meter is not the cause. there is a filter in most meters, and it is prone to build up with gravel and small stones, The filter is on the meter on the inlet pipe side, but you may need the munic to do it for you. One ...


1

Get yourself one of these faucet insulation covers. The stretchy cord on the inside has a loop or hook that grasps the faucet handle. You then press the foam insulator cup over the faucet with the foam seal against the house wall. The foam is thick enough that it is able to conform over an irregular wall surface such as a lap type siding. Then the squeeze ...


1

The code requirement in most areas for the P&T relief plumbing is that it must be a material suitable for potable water plumbing - which in turn typically means it must allow a working pressure of 100psi at 180f. This might seem like an inadequate set of requirements for something intended to drain boiling water or steam, well over 180f, but the key term ...


1

The chlorine in the water will kill any bacteria. Lots of things fluoresce, most are harmless. Get a water filter maybe.


1

BMitch's answer is more likely to be your problem but ... One other possibility: the trap is dry due to lack of use. It doesn't sound like your situation but if you have a tub, as an example, that isn't used often, the trap can dry out. Once it dries out, you'll hear a lot more noise from the plumbing. Simply put a quart of water down any infrequently ...


1

The gurgling typically happens with a vent pipe blockage. Without a source of air to follow behind the rushing water, a vacuum is created that will result in gurgling. You may be seeing that now if the vent pipe is partially blocked and there isn't enough air to support the faster flow. It may be necessary to snake out the vent pipe from the roof and/or run ...



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