Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Probably a charcoal filter. Probably disgusting (people put them in, change the filter a few times, and then get bored of buying the filters, which turn into a gross mess as often as not.) Or the filters become unavailable since these are not exactly a standard item. I'd strongly suggest removing it; if you want to keep it and can find filters for it, at ...


4

Short of opening up the end-cap, there isn't a good way to tell which it is. You could try banging/hitting a pipe elsewhere in the house, to see if you can hear the banging. Also, look at other exposed piping to see what materials were used for the various utilities. Pipe like that could be water, but it also could be oil or natural gas. There is a chance ...


4

Reducing the pipe diameter from 3" to 2" will not decrease the static pressure in the down stream pipes if all valves are closed and no water is flowing. The restriction to 2" will cause a decrease in flow rate to the down stream piping assuming that the head pressure in the 3" line in front of the meter stays the same as with the original 3" meter. If ...


3

Yes, it's an effective S-Trap. S-Traps are known for siphoning and new construction only allows P-Trap installations. You have a long horizontal run after a P-trap that prevents the siphoning effect. The outflow on an S-trap is a straight drop which under high flow conditions can allow more water to be drawn out of the trap than is needed for a water seal, ...


2

Yep, you've got to cut it and should then use a Fernco coupling to plumb a modern PVC flange into the system. In the past I've tried unscrewing cast iron but it always breaks, sometimes shattering past a convenient cut point!


2

It will decrease pressure (when there is water flowing - no effect when water is not flowing) the question being "how much?" The answer will vary with how much water flow there is. This Company's 3" one is only $39 more than their 2". Max peak flow is 396 .vs. 880 Gallons Per Minute (GPM), and max continuous flow is 220 .vs. 528 GPM - so, how many ...


2

Try white vinegar. Drip it into the opening and let it sit for a while or soak a small cloth and leave it on top. Vinegar removes limescale from my flower pots and pet fountains.


2

Diverting the leak up to the shower head using the diverter valve should not be a problem, but your assumption that fixing it will be "pretty easy" may not prove to be true. You are correct in that hot and cold supply to the tub/shower valve needs to be shut off. Sometimes apartment shower valves have built in shut-off valves called integral stops. ...


2

You'd need to reduce the entrance (easy, fittings are made) and RAISE the pipe in the wall (possible but a relatively huge amount of work/expense.) So I'm not quite sure what you mean with "cut down" the drain pipe. As shown in the pictures, I'm inclined to say cut a notch in the back of the drawer for pipe clearance, and get the reducer you need to go from ...


1

These units are designed for the exact application you have. The white pipe in your picture is designed to be used with the special telescoping waste tee assembly that should have been included with the unit. The picture @Comintern linked to is the way you must plumb it. You will need to carefully remove the fittings that are attached to the pipe coming out ...


1

How warm is warm? It's very likely that the air temperature is playing a role in the water temperature in your cold water pipes. As your first questioner asked, does the water get colder if you leave the tap on for a little while? If it does, then you know that the water is colder at the source (your well, or the city water supply) than it is after it's ...


1

Is your drain flowing to a septic tank or to a sewer line? Do you have a boggy area in your yard where the drain is emptying? That could mean you have a broken, collapsed drain. Is there a moisture problem under the house or along the foundation? It may be time to install new drains from the house to accommodate the water flow of the modern house. In ...


1

Well... you've got 22 gallons coming out of the washing machine each cycle. You've got about 2 1/2 gallons in the vertical pipe, and another gallon in the horizontal pipe, so you'd need to store another 20 gallons to be reasonably safe if you go down that route. I wouldn't advise it -- drain water has all sorts of junk in it. Personally, I've never heard of ...


1

You could add a compression fitting between the wall and that device. Tighten the compression fitting at whatever angle you want. That won't give you a flush mount though.


1

You have no hope whatever of it not leaking if you've turned past the end point and backed up. You squish out whatever sealant you have, and then back up and leave a gap. It MIGHT seal if you remove it, apply pipe dope (or tape, but I have better luck with dope), and return it just to the point where it's upright (count turns as you remove it.) If it's ...


1

Your picture doesn't quite give enough information. I think you are saying that whatever that box is (a water heater?) connects to a threaded pipe coming out of the wall. Am I right? If so, the other end of that pipe is probably also threaded. Remove the water heater, then use a pipe wrench to remove the threaded pipe from the wall. Get a new pipe that is a ...


1

The only way would be to actually disconnect all the piping and reconfigure your set-up so that the disposer is on the "main sink" side. It should actually be fairly simple to do, but it is a lot of hard work on your back under the cabinet. Removing and re-setting the disposer is not rocket science but if you have not done it before or are unfamiliar with ...


1

If by "bar-sink drain cover" you mean a perforated strainer like this: then it might be related to the relative "softness" or "hardness" of your water supply. Where I am from we have "hard" water (high in mineral content) which has high surface tension and will not drain as easily through fine strainers. "Soft" water has less or no dissolved minerals but ...


1

The only time I ran into something similar it was due to a failed anti-sweat mixing valve on a toilet that allowed back-flow through the hot water pipes. That would also explain in your case why the kitchen sink doesn't seem to be effected by the issue. About the only way I can think of to test this theory (without opening walls) would be if you can cut ...


1

I don't know if this will work in your situation, but I have a mobile home with very hard well water, and no room for a water softener. The water lines are plastic tubing with some brass shutoff valves. When a toilet or faucet became clogged, I would just turn off and remove the supply line to the fixture and squirt it into a bucket. If that didn't clear it, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible