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5

Try tightening the packing nut (the hex part the stem goes through) a little. That's what it's for. Don't overdo it. The "packing" is the material that seals around the stem - the packing nut compresses that material. On a valve that is not used often, actuating the valve does commonly cause it to leak, as things have "set." Tighten a little, wait, tighten a ...


4

Short of opening up the end-cap, there isn't a good way to tell which it is. You could try banging/hitting a pipe elsewhere in the house, to see if you can hear the banging. Also, look at other exposed piping to see what materials were used for the various utilities. Pipe like that could be water, but it also could be oil or natural gas. There is a chance ...


3

Replace the thing. New ones are not excessively expensive. Attempts at repair are likely to be a futile exercise. The reason is that old disposers often corrode right through the lower portion of the casing and there really is no good way to repair that.


3

According to the International Plumbing Code, the length between a toilet (water closet) trap and the vent is unlimited. Which means if you're only installing a toilet, you don't need a vent. International Plumbing Code 2012 Chapter 9 Vents Section 909 Fixture Vents 909.1 Distance of trap from vent. Each fixture trap shall have a ...


3

Plumbing code is generally unconcerned with the style of whatever fixture you choose to install, only that the fixture work properly and be installed properly.


3

Sounds like the chain is too short. The flapper has to come up past vertical, so that it's out of the way for the full flush. Once the tank starts to fill again, the flapper will slam shut. If the chain is too long, it won't lift the flapper enough. If the chain is too short, it won't let the flapper fall into the full open position. The chain has to be ...


2

Overall, your plan to run PEX inside the HDPE and connecting them is acceptable. However, I would not try to jury-rig fittings together. It sounds like you are trying to find a fitting designed for PEX that just happens to "fit" the HDPE, or vice-versa. This is a recipe for mechanical failure. After putting in all this work, the last thing you will want to ...


2

Standard bathroom faucets come in versions that have the faucet handles on 4" centers, 8" centers, or separate pieces that can be placed at any distance apart. I have never heard of a jurisdiction whose building codes require a specific distance for handle centers. But to be certain, check with the local plumber who will be installing the fixture.


2

Looks like the threads on the bolt are crushed/damaged, so you're only choice might be to drill it out or cut it off. Put on a pair of good work gloves. Remove the blade from a hack saw. Then work the blade between the nut, and the plastic washer. It will likely be slow, hard work, but eventually you should be able to cut the bolt. Alternatively, you ...


2

The most expedient and practical solution is to drill out the bolt. Probably access is better from the top through the tank, but it can be done from either side. The goal of "drilling out" is to weaken the shaft of the bolt enough so that either the friction on the nut is reduced to the point where it turns, or the shaft breaks and separates into two ...


2

There are many ways to assemble the new drain. Assuming the 1 1/2" pipe is threaded: 1) screw an 1 1/2" ABS female adapter to the pipe. 2) using a short piece of 1 1/2" ABS pipe, glue an 1 1/2" ABS slip X slip elbow on, so it ends up facing out towards where the new trap will be. 3) glue a piece of 1 1/2" ABS pipe of appropriate length into the elbow ...


2

That looks like a standard '3/8 compression x 1/2" MIP' (male iron pipe) connector. You can get it at any hardware store. Normal procedure is to cut the tubing above the fitting and install a new one. Your tubing does not look too good, you have to have fairly smooth tubing surface for the new compression fitting to be able to slide on and seal. You may ...


2

I would use a non-return valve Diameter: 0.75 in Maximum Bar Pressure: 16 bar Type: Non-Return Colour: Black-Grey Material: PVC Ideally used for conveying water and other fluids in urban and inter-urban infrastructure, industrial, mining, landscape, and farming applications Note: This one seems expensive, I suspect I can buy about ten ...


2

For drainage, you can use a mechanical gear type coupling such as a fernco coupling: You can slide it over the pipe you're installing, and then once the pipe is in place, slide it back over the joint and tighten the gear clamps.


2

The plumber's putty will not work, pull it all out of there please. The pop-up assy. should have included a fairly thick tapered rubber gasket to seal against the underside of the drain hole. This gasket has a flat back for the "crappy plastic" washers to rest against, those are actually friction rings designed to let the nut spin freely and press up against ...


2

Odds seem high that you didn't actually turn the water back on correctly, since the taps in the bath were what you worked on and the kitchen now doesn't get water which cannot be caused by the bath taps - but can be caused by not opening valves after closing them to work on the bath taps. Impossible to provide any more specific hint from afar, but follow the ...


2

There are two main factors that determine what is used: Code requirements (as well as the project's specifications) Cost ABS and PVC are the cheapest, however there can be limitations with their use in larger buildings due to fire code requirements. Where fire codes requirements limit the use of plastics, either cast-iron or DWV copper is used for the ...


2

I think new sink drainpipes are almost all PVC. I recently replaced a corroded metal kitchen sink pipe with PVC, but in the store I noticed that metal downpipes are still available. In theory PVC should be more resistant to chemicals and rust while metal is more resistant to heat. But most drain cleaners don't contain lye any more and nobody in their ...


2

The accepted answer is the correct way to fix the problem. However, if there's a valve that's too corroded to turn the nut, or that isn't fixed by that solution, you can give this a try. It's not a good solution, but it works in a pinch :) A common practice when this type of leak happens is to simply open the valve all the way, except more so. In other ...


1

If you don't use it why replace it? Just remove it and put a standard drain in.


1

Epoxy. Really. Epoxy the fitting right to the pipe.


1

That looks perfectly suitable. One additional thing you should be aware of, though - if your existing plumbing contains any yellow brass fittings, they really need to come out because of a chemical quirk of PEX; the zinc gets leached out of yellow brass, leaving behind only soft copper, and the fittings may either leak or plug solid. You can use RED brass, ...


1

The problem here was using the right search terms. Based on Tester101's comment I tried some additional terms, especially "flare". Although I did not originally want a flare cap, it helped improve the search results enormously so I was able to find the right kind of suppies and narrow down to something that would work. Ultimately I got this: 5/16 Brass SAE ...


1

Could it be an airlock? Try opening all the taps in the house until they all run freely. (possibly not all the way, as overwhelming the incoming supply would be counterproductive). Do you know what sort of water layout you have? As you are referring to "taps" then I would guess a typical UK layout with a cold-water header tank that feeds the hot system ...


1

I agree that taking it apart is the best way to thoroughly clean it. If it hasn't been open in a while, you might need to put some muscle into it. Drano sells a kit that comes with a drain snake, which can help break up the plug and pull it out. That is much more effective than a liquid alone.


1

I know that you said you cannot get the cleanout plug - but this is your best bet at removing large debris. Try: Wrap a small towel over the plug and turn counter clock wise ("Righty tighty, lefty loosy") Use an adjustable wrench to break the cleanout plug free If the above attempts do not work or you have already done that route: Use a drain snake to ...


1

I do not think it would be a good idea to double up on the clamps. When you are clamping PEX onto a fitting, you want to try to get the clamp near the middle of the fitting, ideally between two ribs. With two clamps, it wouldn't be possible to do this. To ease your trepidation about the staying power of the clamps, do a test clamp on a fitting. Let it ...


1

The purpose of a drain pan is to contain small leaks that can lead to damage and can give you warning that there is a problem. This doesn't mean that it is necessary, however for 10$ - 20$ at your local hardware store you could have picked one up - worth the small investment. (I'm surprised that a plumber who is called to install a hotwater tank doesn't have ...


1

1 1/2" ABS P-Trap kit 1 1/2" ABS slip X slip elbow slip joint style fitting, do not use these fitting inside the wall, ever. universal (or "all purpose") glue, make sure it says PVC and ABS


1

First, do not attempt to break the brick into any more pieces, should you succeed these pieces may get lodged further down the pipe making it that much more complicated (and expensive) to resolve. Unfortunately the only solution will be to cut the section of pipe that the brick is stuck in and remove it. Call a plumber: it already sounds like you are in ...



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