Hot answers tagged

7

This sounds like the backwash on your water softener. It should be set to cycle at 1 am or so when you wouldn't hear it, but the clock could have been reset from a power outage. Normally, it will trickle for 20-30 minutes as it brines the resin bed and then it will backwash the resin bed with clean water for 10 mins or so. This water must all be dumped to ...


6

Adding more solder almost never works, because the problem is almost never "not enough solder" - the problem is almost always poor pipe preparation, where some part of the pipe is not cleaned and fluxed (separate things - physically clean, then chemically clean via flux - flux can't cure macroscopic dirt.) Overheating one or both parts when soldering can ...


4

this looks like a chinese unit one of my granite suppliers used to use. they are the biggest piece of junk on the planet. if i remember correctly, the small screw in the middle acts as a retainer for the whole unit. you have unscrew it from above, and it holds the whole thing together. the problem we had was that the screw got locked into the metal ...


4

Call a pro Call Roto-Rooter®, or any other plumber of your choice. They'll be able to feed a camera down the line, and tell you exactly where, and what the clog is. Even without a fancy camera, a plumber should be able to use a regular snake to locate the clog. Use a snake If you want to give it a try yourself, plumbing snakes (auger) are available at ...


4

Shutoff the water supply to the dishwasher and run water through the sink drain from the faucet. If the flow of water stops to the dishwasher, then the problem is in the supply and Ed's advice is likely on track. If you find water filling the dishwasher with the supply turned off, then the problem is with the drain line. The drain needs to be attached to ...


4

Sounds like you need to replace the flush valve and possibly the shut off valve. If you believe you have the water shut off, and you still have a drip, then the shutoff valve is corroded enough to jam before it is fully off. The flush valve is pretty obviously malfunctioning. Replace both of these and you should be back to normal. Good luck!


4

There are several possibilities to consider. If you had really cleaned the joint beforehand with emery cloth or steel wool (both parts of the mated joint) there there is a good chance of a decent joint. The cleaning action helps clear out any oxidation on the parts that prevents the solder from adhering to the copper. (Keep in mind though that the simple ...


3

I would replace the entire sillcock (also called a stopcock, outdoor faucet, hose faucet, or spigot), because it looks like you lost the handle, too; in which case you should watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj_nTbIWzfI, Or if you really intend to repair it, try this instead: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cALQ3PR7k30 Edit- One ...


3

You have sediment in your pipes. Replacing the valve will not fix this. Try thoroughly flushing your lines through faucets that don't have aerators. Such as, the outside hose valves and utility sinks. Remove the aerators from other valves and flush those lines too. Then see if you get better flow. Good luck!


3

You are experiencing a fairly normal event for a well with pump and pressure tank, though if the behavior seems new & different the pressure tank may require maintenance or repair/replacement. Most well pumps (there are exceptions, such as "constant pressure pumps") run on a simple differential pressure switch with a 20 PSI differential (often ...


3

The only real answer can be "as long as it takes". There are so many variables that affect how easily the water will evaporate that you can't predict. Could be hours in some situations, could be months in others. You need to figure out how to measure how much water is left. You might consider buying a moisture content meter; there are ones with pins that ...


3

I think you'd end up running into a whole boat load of issues before you could even begin talking about efficiency. The first and most pressing being the rapid condensation that would occur within seconds of circulating the cold liquid (leaving you with a whole host of other DIY problems you'd need to work out). Which, I imagine would need to be somewhere ...


2

Maybe. The proper solution is to: Drain the pipe and open a valve somewhere to vent the vapor Heat up the joint, and pull it apart. Clean fittings to remove any remaining solder. Apply flux to both fittings. Solder the joint.


2

Assuming you're talking about something like this: Source: plumbingsupply.com and that the tube is connected to the protrusion at the top, I would suggest a simple hose clamp to hold it in place. Source: hcl-clamping.com They come in a wide variety of sizes and one small enough to fit that would be pretty cheap. Just don't over tighten and crush the ...


2

Try one wrap of electrical tape around the tube. If that ever fails, move on to hot glue (or try two wraps). Try nipping a 1/4" or so off the tube, if there's enough slack. Try detaching the tube and reversing it.


2

The drain valve could be sticking. There is usually a solenoid that opens the drain valve at the end of the cycle and the water is pumped out instead of circulating. If the solenoid or the valve is malfunctioning then water could be left after the cycle or the dishwasher doesn't fill as far as it should. Experiment some more but it sounds like a repair is ...


2

If this happens just one or twice a few minutes after you've used the cold tap, it's more likely to be thermal expansion. Especially in the winter when the water arrives further below room temperature, or if you have a mixer tap. Some taps hold quite a lot of water, and the few percent thermal expansion from the incoming temperature to run temperature can ...


2

The seal in your faucet is failing, and water is building up very slowly. Surface tension keeps it in a shallow bubble until it finally flows out the horizontal faucet segment in a burst. Disassemble your faucet and check for mineral deposits and other debris. Clean or replace the ceramic or rubber seals, and lubricate rubber seals with white grease.


2

The following two techniques are perhaps not the best methods, but they're basically free, and don't require any tools. Pinpointing the blockage might not be realistic, and practice may be helpful. Using both techniqes might help get you within a foot of the obstruction. If the pipe is partially blocked (such that it will drain after a couple hours) the ...


2

It's normal. Your "out pipe" and his share a connection. As the water rushes past your connection, suction is created, and a little water goes "out" your toilet. I would get one of those "refresh" kits that replace the flapper, just to be sure and call it done.


2

The point of that system was convenience. Plumbing was expensive and time-consuming 100 years ago. Whether it's common depends on the neighborhood and the city, of course. Whether it's acceptable now depends on your local ordinances. Most "gray water" is required to pass through an approved septic system. I'm surprised that local code doesn't require an ...


2

To clarify: about your statement that the catch basin should be for storm drains... yes- storm drains can use catch basins. But I'm pretty sure that in this case the sink water is draining into the city sewer. This was a regular design in Chicago, but I don't think it's common in the rest of the US. I think it's safe to say that the design is not popular ...


2

If you're going to the trouble and expense of re-tiling the shower, removal of the existing drywall and tile is trivial. Also, a layer of tile isn't a proper moisture barrier anyway. I'd either seal the grout and use the shower as it is, or do it right and remove the existing.


2

Turn off water supply to water heater, turn off (not pilot) gas to water heater. If the cold water shutoff to the heater is beyond the break, turn off the main water supply valve.


2

Both should be brass & be perfectly fine for a proper & normal water plumbing system that doesn't have any regular steel, iron or aluminum in its components or connecting components. Those materials have been specifically relegated to natural gas & propane plumbing due to their inabilities to play nice.


2

requested to make an answer: I believe you will find it is nickel plated brass, This is a common type of fitting and there would not be a problem. One of the largest problems for galvanic corrosion that I have seen is between copper and galvanized. A dielectric union helps but with a high mineral level in the water some corrosion can bee seen in just a few ...


2

Some people describe the smell of the additive that they put in natural gas as a "rotten eggs smell". I am not sure if they use such additive in natural gas in Italy but if so then you may want to consider that this smell is the accumulated gas from a gas leak someplace.


2

Yes, You have neglected to show how any particular sized water softener would fit onto a shelf table size of 15" x 20"; let alone get it into that space. Also you will need a riser on the softener side of the P-Trap that you have shown there. Seems to me that there will also need to be a guaranteed airgap between softener drain line and P-Trap riser. If ...


1

For common bathtubs the correct overflow gasket should be wedge shaped with a flat side and an angled side. The flat side mates with the overflow horn (the piece directly behind the hole) and the angled side mates with the backside of the tub, fat part down to match the slope of the tub wall. I have seen them made of both solid rubber and foam rubber. I ...


1

Coteyr has the right idea, wrong pipe. The water supply pipe is constricted somewhere below both your apartments. Probably from scale buildup. His toilet's demand is causing a dramatic pressure drop, which is unseating your toilet's supply valve. It's running a little bit, and you're hearing that. It may be causing water to run out the tank overflow and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible