Hot answers tagged

15

You only have to replace the wax ring if the toilet leaks. It's wise to replace it whenever you remove the toilet, though. It's not a matter of age, but the fact that a wax ring is intended to be a single-use item. They squish into place when you set a toilet, and that can't happen very well more than once. It's certainly possible that you achieved a ...


10

It's fine. That's just air dissolved in the water forming on the nucleation points of the rubber.


7

Drain pipes are generally run below the "frost line" for the region, and should never freeze in anthing resembling a normal winter.


6

You're looking at a nut. That ring threads onto the nipple. It may not have been installed correctly. It's intended to be used as a clamp base, with the screws you removed tightening against the upper ring. Partially reinstall the screws and use them to help turn the nut. Spray it with some penetrating oil or WD-40 to help loosen it. You could also ...


5

Are you talking about that flexible tube sticking off to the right? It's not a vent pipe. It's a poorly done drain for something like a clothes washer or a water softener. I suggest pulling that flexible tube out, scraping off the black crud, and gluing in a short piece of PVC pipe and a cap.


5

According to Uniform Plumbing Code Table 6-5 (610.3), the Water Supply Fixture Units (wsfu) per fixture in a private residence are as follows: Dishwasher = 1.5 Kitchen sink = 1.5 Washup sink = 0 So you're supplying 3 wsfu. According to Table 6-6 (610.4), at 30-45 psi you can supply 3 wsfu with ½" pipe with a developed length of up to 100'. 46-60 psi ...


4

This looks like it's a renovation, or maybe just an island sink, because of the anti-siphon valve (aka air admittance valve (AAV), aka cheater vent). Either way, it's fairly sloppy plumbing by the looks of it. I'll leave aside the use of the AAV as I've never seen one like that: in many jurisdictions they're not allowed at all, and I've only ever seen ones ...


4

The most common leaks that don't show themselves (damage, or water on the ground) are either inside toilets (the toilet leaks water from the tank to the bowl) or in the water line outside the house. Right where the water line comes into the house there should be a valve. The first place I would start is to turn off the main valve in the house then check ...


4

Depending on the size and age of your home, and the location of the plumbing fixtures. It's entirely possible that there's only a single vent stack. If all the drains are within a certain distance of the stack, no additional vent pipes may be required. According to Wikipedia's article on Drain-waste-vent system. ...Under many older building codes, a ...


4

If you're installing a whole new flange, use the standard rough-in distance of 12" and get a toilet with a 12" rough-in. If the flange is already there and it's less than 12" away from the wall and you don't want to move it, use whatever toilet will fit or install an offset flange.


4

Torquing a bolted joint serves a very specific purpose - to set the clamping force exerted by the bolt on the joint. By applying some specific torque to a bolt with a certain thread pitch, the effect is to stretch the bolt by a specific amount. The bolt then acts like a spring, clamping the joint together. Overtightening the bolt applies too much clamping ...


4

No, you should not do that. As mentioned in a comment, the drain is going to fill up with gunk and clog. Depending on use, you'll find that you have to snake this line quite often. While traps do hold water, they are limited in the depth of water they can hold. Traps are also designed in such a way, that normal use stirs up any "sediment" and helps flush ...


3

The grout may help to keep the toilet stabile for awhile, but to ensure it remains level and secure you should install shims. I've used plastic building shims that can be snapped-off at 2 inch increments. Any flat material that is water-proof will do. Loosen the bolts at the base of the toilet first. Place a level on the rim of the bowl and shim up the ...


3

Code requires toilets to be caulked at the floor, that, IMO is a mistake. If the toilet does develop a leak, it will be restricted under the toilet and the subfloor, and may leak for a while before it is detected. So much for that. The toilet can be shimmed to keep it from rocking. Because of the rocking, what is not leaking now eventually will leak. The ...


3

Yes they can, especially in exposed areas. I've heard of sewage pipes freezing in the winter and backing up into apartments in NYC, with disastrous consequences, though the more likely culprit is something that was poured down the drain. You could always pour some boiling water down the drain to see if it would help.


3

98% of the time the answer is no. It is a straight line from the bottom of your main stack. The drain hole is a branch off your main stack. This can vary though but this is the norm in the US.


3

In general, the tank can be installed vertically above or below the plumbing, or horizontally. Typically, the tank is only required to be supported when installed in the horizontal position. Most smaller tanks are designed to be supported by the plumbing, when installed in the vertical orientation. The most common recommendation seems to be, to install the ...


3

For this type of valve it is normal for there to be some hissing as the tank is nearly full, because as the float rises with the water level, it is gradually closing the valve. The hissing is the sound of water movement through a nearly-closed valve. If you can trigger the same sound by flushing and then manually raising the float so the valve is nearly ...


3

The one pipe you notice exiting from the roof is indeed a vent stack. Since there is only that single pipe projecting out it would be reasonable to guess it is the main stack that all the other drain lines connect into. The simple reason for not seeing any smaller or secondary vents is because they are located out of sight behind the walls at each sink or ...


3

Your system is almost certainly vented. Plumbing vents provide a path for sewer gases to escape so they don't bubble up through the P traps into your house under pressure (the sewer gases will expand and exert greater than atmospheric pressure), and the vents also keep water pressure from siphoning your traps dry, which would create an easy natural path for ...


3

The combo tee has a longer sweep. Long sweeps are easier to run a snake through and drain better as the water path is gradually changed (if you have the space to use them). 45 wye Combination wye & 1/8


3

It's actually not uncommon to use a water heater for heating a well-insulated building (though an electric water heater is very UN-common, due to operating cost.) But.... This is not commonly done with radiators, which are typically designed to operate on 180F water. It is much more common with radiant floor heating, which can function quite well down at ...


3

The "glunk-glunk" is air being pushed or pulled around the water in the trap. Often this indicates a blocked vent pipe. In your situation the upstream plumbing or even the main stack may have been considered a wet vent and be perfectly fine. With the clog at the main near the street, the air pressure inside the pipes is building up from water draining above, ...


3

I have replaced bathroom sinks of various types with ceramic style sinks that sit from the top of the vanity cabinet surface. This work best if the before and after sinks both had the faucet holes as part of the sink body itself. Another factor to consider is selecting a new sink that will work within the hole size of the old sink. This can make the ...


2

You may have a pump protection device controlling power to your pump. If you have this device there may be a problem with it or you pump causing it to act like this. Search "Pumptec Franklin" ours acted similarly when the device faulted.


2

Check the water pressure & air pressure of your system when the water almost stops flowing as you've described (i.e. before the pump engages). You may have a small hole in your bladder. The other possibilities are: The valve that your incompetent service person opened is not opened completely. That would cause the incoming water to not keep up with ...


2

From the photo you posted I can see you have a different problem from what you may think. The reason the vent pipe is damaged is because a "critter" has ben gnawing it away! The most likely suspects in the animal world (in N.A.) would be in the rodent species: squirrel, rat, chipmunks, porcupines to name just a few. You can see the small serration grooves ...


2

The overflow pipe is for when the tank is full AND the normal fill-control system for the tank fails. If there is water entering the overflow pipe either due to a failed fill control setup or due to a leak in the connections at the bottom of the tank then that is a problem that should be fixed. I would suggest adding some food coloring or similar dye into ...


2

The smaller diameter pipe is because it is specified for in-wall use. The socket end of a standard 3" PVC pipe coupling is 3.97" which is wider than a 2 x 4 stud wall cavity, which is 3.5". The 3.25" pipe OD on the in-wall pipe allows for a smaller coupling which can fit inside the wall cavity. Depending on the size and type of leak, you might have been ...


2

Don't know about that particular model but I have brass seats as well. I had a leak and carefully replaced washers on both sides properly. Still had a small leak. Replaced both valve seats (only $4 each so why not) even though I knew it was clearly the cold leaking. Checked and double checked and examined seats and washers carefully -- nothing odd. Still ...



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