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8

You could make someone happy and have it video inspected and/or snaked (where "someone" is the guy who gets paid) but there's plenty of 100 year old waste plumbing still in service, and not being used does not harm the pipe. Dump 5 gallons down there and see if it leaves promptly - if not, then spend extra money on it.


4

It is not sealed with petroleum jelly but a beveled slip washer. You can try to tighten the nut on the p-trap where the black pvc enters the copper p-trap. If that does not work, you will need to get a new 1 1/2 beveled slip joint washer. Your big box home improvement stores carry them as do any plumbing supply houses. They also make rubber washers for ...


4

It depends on where the actual leaks are. If the leaks are at the solder joint, then this would indicate poor workmanship from the installer. If the pipes themselves are developing pinholes, then you could have gotten a bad batch of copper pipe that had impurities in it. Recycled copper used for pipes can have impurities in them which can lead to pinhole ...


4

In my part of the world, PVC P-traps for sinks and basins are universally designed so that you can easily remove the U-bend from below without tools. I wouldn't hesitate very long before undoing all the obvious nuts visible in your picture† and attempting to gain access to the U-bend. In some cases a strap-wrench may be useful, but usually those joints ...


4

Laundry Shut-off valve - any hardware/plumbing store or the internet.


3

Cast Iron drain pipe with Bell fittings, these are packed with oakum and overlaid with hot poured lead driven in place to seal and then a second layer poured in to complete the seal. It may only need the lead driven in to repack the oakum and a new layer of lead poured. Contact a plumber with knowledge about old drain systems, cast iron can take a long ...


3

It really sounds like the drain line blockage is beyond the place where the basement drain exits the foundation and goes off to either the public sewer system or private septic system. Could be broken underground line, line filled in with tree roots seeking water through joints or holes in the piping, or sediment / deposits in the line that have restricted ...


3

If you notice at the top, there is a handy dandy nut (if you will) that you can unscrew. Take that off, and you're half way to removing it. After that, you can unscrew the bottom of the p trap from the rest of the pipe. Next you will need a PVC P trap kit. Make sure you bring your old pipe to the hardware store and check that you get the correct size ...


3

The black collar seen on the bottom picture is what is keeping the faucet on. It is a plastic nut that screws on the threads you see to clamp the faucet onto the countertop. That is what you need to unscrew with the basin wrench (or any other that can reach).


3

Black plastic drain pipes are typically ABS. White, usually PVC. There is a special cement that can join the two which will be found in the area with regular PVC cement at the plumbing supply. Just check the label carefully. Not silicone - no way, no how, don't go there.


3

...you have some of the best tap water in the country. Either remove it completely, or possibly use a carbon filter cartridge if there's enough chlorine to bother you. If the filter looks off, the filter housing probably needs a good cleaning/sanitizing. Which one (or how many) of the bottled water companies is just bottled NYC tap water?


3

Pex in the attic simply needs to be run BELOW the insulation. Put it against the ceiling drywall, and it will never get particularly cold. The problem is, lots of installers don't do this. My contractor actually went to some trouble to hang the pex up high. I had to go through and undo all the clamps and put it down below the insulation, but it wasn't too ...


2

Pinholes are a sign of a poor sweat job or defective pipe. I would replace the entire length of pipe with PEX, removing any possible catastrophic leak.


2

Sounds like you have a slow-draining blockage in the drain arm between the toilet and the main drain. If you haven't used it in a while, the drain is empty and you can flush it, filling the arm with water and forcing the air back out of the toilet (hence the gurgle). The second time or third time you flush, the drain is already full and there's no place ...


2

Collapses are just one problem with clay sewers. Probably more common are roots clogging the pipe. If they do collapse, it can occur under your foundation slab, or out in your yard. Some 60 year old clay sewers might still be in great condition while others not so great. If you want to know the condition of yours then get a video inspection. Do you have a ...


2

Presumably the metal plumbing was your ONLY ground connection (from both the behavior and your description of the ground wire run.) You might want to have an electrician take a look at the system. In any case adding some driven ground rods tied into the grounding system would be a good idea.


2

Sounds like you need to replace the mixing valve. This is a simple part to replace. This usually involves removing the handle and possibly the trim, then removing a retaining clip, and the pulling out the cartridge. Buy a new one and reverse the process. Here's a good set of instructions for Moen valves: ...


2

Moisture pooling in the joints like that suggests standing water in the pipe, which will eventually rust it out for sure. If this is the case, there's probably a blockage of some sort downstream that's resulting in sewage backup (ew). I would definitely address that first. After that, you can decide whether or not it's worth replacing pipe. My guess is that ...


2

Do you know the temperature of steam pipes? Do you know the ignition point of wood? Some say the "ignition" point of wood is 451 deg F. Most say around 570 deg F. Either way, the surface temperature of steam pipes will NEVER even get close to that. Typically upwards of 250 deg F. I think you can trust your plumber on this one.


2

You could try using a pick-up or claw tool to reach down in the drain to grab it and pull it out. Something like this one at Amazon.com.


1

Simple (and cheap) method would be to install the mixing valve set of your choice for the wall with the shower head and install two simple control valves upstream of the mixing valve unit, one for hot and one for cold. You could leave the mixer set at the temperature and flow rate that you normally use, the upstream valves would basically be remote shut-offs ...


1

It sounds like what you really need is a remote controlled shower valve and temperature controller. Most major manufacturers are offering these now including the likes of Kohler, Moen and others. These give you remote digital control of your shower including temperature, timer mode, warm up mode and flow rate control. If you're not prepared for the ...


1

Sure I think you could do this. You'd need another set of supply lines at the other side, and a second valve. You'd then run the pipe for the shower head to the other side of the shower and T it in with the other shower head pipe. The only downside I can think of is the cost - a good thermostatic valve is expensive!


1

The problem is in the street, or at least towards it, as Michael suggests. If you snaked it yourself I doubt it made it all the way to the street. If it was professionally snaked, start making phone calls to whoever did it and to the city. Jerseyville Sewage Plant. Call them and tell them your problem persists even after having your main line professionally ...


1

HomeDepot carries a brand called "SharkBite" that are simple, push-to-connect fittings. You can buy a cap from them for cheap. It requires an equally inexpensive plastic tool to remove. That, or something like it, should get the job done. The cap: http://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBite-1-2-in-Brass-Push-Fit-End-Stop-U514LFA/202270531 The removal tool: ...


1

Sounds like a pissed-off fill valve, acting like a reed. You'd have to get your hands on a crappy toilet, swap out the fill valve, and hope it has a similar failure; not recommended. (all puns intended)


1

That thing is so hard to twist off, you'll likely need a basin wrench, which is also sometimes known as a sink wrench. When I took my faucet off recently, I followed this article for the most part. The hardest part for sure was getting that unscrewed, but luckily I found a basin wrench and it went smoother.


1

The future health of the system can only be insured by gutting it. However, you're paying insurance; who cares? I don't really know the ins-and-outs of insurance but perhaps you should send them a letter recommending that they do replace the whole system; providing leverage for you to stand on when it breaks in the future and they want to raise your rate ...


1

That was not previous tenant work. That was shoddy handyman work over a long period of time. I'd venture to bet it was the LL himself trying to save money. Bottom line is: You CANNOT do ANY electrical work in a place that you are renting (if that's what you are asking). Your only recourse is to contact the LL and tell him about it and ask him to make the ...


1

You may want to try at a local hardware store as opposed to going off to the big chain box stores. My local hardware store has a few catalogs that show many styles of faucets for kitchen sinks - including a lot of "normal" looking ones. There are also a number of online sites including www.faucet.com although I have not always been convinced that their ...



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