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4

Short answer is, because the 1/2" flexible tubing is short enough to not cause a major pressure loss. If you ran 1/2" line the whole way, it would be too much pressure drop. Pressure drop across a pipeline is a function of all the friction losses added together. These include "major" losses (the official terminology, not mine) from the friction with the ...


3

As stated in comment, it's really very unlikely that the steam supply is high pressure steam (per the standard nomenclature of the industry) for a multitude of reasons - too hot, requiring a dedicated, licensed boiler operator, and the commissioning and annual inspections would have failed the copper pipes before it was ever fired up. Also, someone would ...


3

It's a trick question, you can never get 4 bar of pressure with only a 20 m head. The pressure due to a vertical column of liquid is equal to the density x height of the column x the acceleration due to gravity (little g = 9.8 m/s2). Your height is 20m Density of water is 1000 kg/m3 g = 9.8 So, pressure is 196,000 Pascals 100,000 Pascal per bar, so ...


2

I installed a brass ball valve about 13 years ago with the handle pointing against the flow when in the on position. It has worked perfectly. My valve is female by female so the direction did not matter when assembly the piping. In short: a ball is round so direction does no matter. If a valve must be installed in a certain direction is should have an arrow ...


2

I would advise against Drano. The sulfur smell you are smelling is because it is mainly composed of Sulfuric Acid. If you smell it throughout your house it might be damaging your pipes. To clear a clog I would recommend a plunger and a drain snake before resorting to any acids. If those do not work I would recommend a plumber. However, be cautious now. If ...


2

It depends on your flow rate, and the length of your run. The short answer is you won't have a noticeable pressure drop for a relatively short run. Using this table, the nominal inside diameters of the pipes actually give you a slightly greater cross sectional area from the two 1/2" pipes (0.608 sq. in. vs 0.533 sq. in.). However, the head loss is still ...


2

The refill tube goes into the overflow tube and that water fills the bowl after each flush. However, the original poster is correct that a lot of water is wasted because once the bowl is filled with water to a certain line and if the tank isn't filled yet, the refill tube will keep flowing and the additional water added to the bowl via the overflow tube ...


2

Remove everything currently under the sink that is not glued and use a rags to plug the drain pipes. Next, let the counter guys do there work and install the sink. There is nothing to do until they are done. After they are done, follow the install instructions on the disposal. After that is done, mount a new p-trap kit from one of the drain pipes to the ...


2

The reason why the plumber says this is that the cost to replace just the screw (for him) would be greater than the cost to replace the whole handle and valve assembly. This is because he can replace the whole handle assembly in 10 minutes, but it would probably take him at least 30-45 minutes minimum to find and install a perfect replacement screw. If you ...


2

Carefully dig it out (a garden hose may be useful for "hydro-excavating" right next to the pipe, otherwise some careful trowel and shovel work) and figure out where it does run, then you can decide what to do about it. Beware of possible other poorly buried items while you are digging (wires, etc.) Assuming you have to work with where it comes out of the ...


1

It is possible this was originally used for a wood fired water heater? Perhaps This would have been the precursor to the wood/pellet stoves currently in use in some parts of the country. Maybe someone wanted a fancy outhouse (or other out building) with hot water. Very odd scenario!! What to do now? It depends on how much time and money you want to ...


1

That screw is most likely a standard machine screw. If you can remove it, then bring it to the local hardware store to see if you can find a replacement. Make sure that the replacement is brass. Most other screws will end up corroding and aren't suitable for plumbing. To remove the screw, you may need to use a screw extractor. Before you try that, see if ...


1

The easiest and first thing to check is the trim pieces around your valve knob(s). These trim pieces usually come with a cheap foam gasket, which crumbles apart after a while. Then water runs down the wall, gets behind the trim, and goes into the wall. When you take the trim pieces off, if the gaskets look bad, scrape them off and replace them with a bead ...


1

You should cut out the back of the cabinet.


1

Heat both parts moderately and safely (ie, don't set the house on fire) concentrating on the Tee or outside part. Then apply ice to the pipe (ie, the "inside part" of the joint.) This is usually a more practical (and less frustrating) approach than trying to heat one and cool the other at the same time. The idea in play is to expand the outer part and ...


1

A tile guy I've been working with gave me a great pro tip recently: do all the plumbing in a shower in a vertical straight line, and use a single vertical line of accent tiles to cover them up, going floor-to-ceiling. This way, if you ever need to bust up tiles and access the pipes behind them, you only have to re-do that single line of tiles, not the whole ...


1

It will corrode quickly. The Aluminum will break down.I recommend that you put a non-metallic barrier between the two. If you want to do it on the cheap, and If you have some Never-Seez or even some PTFE tape laying around, do it. Check it in a few months, replace the barrier, check again later. Galvanic Corrosion happens because of the different in ...


1

Aluminum and brass with an electrolyte between them (water) can still result in galvanic corrosion. Are there any plastic (PVC) fittings you could use for this application? I would choose a plastic fitting if possible.


1

The CSST (corrugated stainless steel tubing) is approved as a drop and in concealed stud cavities; however, the manufacturer's installation instruction regarding protecting the piping in the stud cavity needs to be followed. Usually strip wound conduit is required for 12" from locations that secure the csst (terminations and penetration at the top or bottom ...


1

Worst case is that you bust a soldered fitting (very difficult) and have to open the wall up, which you would have had to do to replace a soldered fitting anyway. Since your water is already shutoff, give it a hard turn and see what happens. Personally, I'd open the wall up even if it's threaded and sealed with pipe dope. Because after you replace the ...


1

Municipal Water systems require a Pressure Reducing Valve (PRV). It is not recommended to have the house psi above 90. 70 is the norm in most municipal systems. An expansion tank is needed if there is a check valve installed on the in line. If there is a water meter, there is an excellent chance of one being installed. Many water utilities mandate check ...


1

Yes: your proposed cross-connect will maximize pressure on the outflow. But, as aaron commented, you will need to put a second check valve on the low pressure line between the cross connect and the tank to avoid losing pressure back to the tank (or, worse, blowing it out since there is presumably no shutoff valve on the tank outlet).


1

is this likely to be a leak? If it has been happening for more than a week and there is no sign of water, like a discoloured or damp patch on the ceiling or wall, then no. is there another explanation? When pipes heat up, they expand, as they expand they rub against the woodwork or other material they are fixed to. Frctional forces cause the pipe ...


1

If there's a valve, then turn it off and remove the pipe. If you're concerned the valve will leak, then shutoff the water to that line, remove the valve and cap the pipe there (or replace any T's with a straight fitting). Leaving the pipe and capping the thin refrigerator line will be difficult and error prone, and you're still left with a valve and two ...


1

Check all the tanks that hold water - they will have overflows in case of overpressure or in case an old fill-valve starts to fail to close completely. If the plumbing system has header tanks for cold and/or hot-water, these have overflows for when the fill-valve gets old and fails to close completely. Also lavatory cisterns have overflows for the same ...


1

We have lived in this well-built and well-maintained 25-year-old home for three years and for three years, one toilet smelled like old urine within hours of thorough cleaning. We called a plumber who said all was working well, and that there were no leaks. I finally had the plumber come back and pull the toilet and check the wax ring. Which was FINE, but ...


1

You need to evaluate where the leak is really coming from. Use some paper towels to thoroughly to dry the whole fitting area. Then watch to see where water first appears. I suspect that you may find the leak coming from here: ..as opposed to the PEX joint. It appears that you did not use a Teflon sealing tape on the pipe threads.


1

Pressure of the gravity fed water delivered from the overhead tank will have nothing to do with the pipe size used. The pressure is dependent only on the vertical distance between the top of the water in the tank and the delivery point. Where pipe size does come into play is in the flow rate that is needed at the delivery point. If you only have one ...


1

A 3/4" meter isn't going to make that big of a pressure drop, especially if the line is 1500 ft. long (which is probably why it's 1.5", which is otherwise a pretty big line for a house). The piping is most likely 1.5" just to prevent pressure loss over the long run, and then it steps down to 3/4" anyway when it goes in to the house. Having said that, it ...


1

Putting any obstruction or turn in a water line will affect the flow and hence the water pressure. Not only will narrowing the line cut the pressure, but all the meter-related crap inside the device will cause massive turbulence and other flow-restricting effects. As far as legal issues are concerned, read whatever agreement you may have signed with the ...



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