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4

If it is copper pipe and was indeed soldered (using a tin-lead alloy or a more modern lead-free solder), then propane should work okay. However, MAPP (originally methylacetylene-propadiene propane but now stabilized liquefied petroleum gas with propylene) will heat faster and, with a common sense caution, not melt the pipe. That is, don't heat the pipe ...


4

There are several possibilities to consider. If you had really cleaned the joint beforehand with emery cloth or steel wool (both parts of the mated joint) there there is a good chance of a decent joint. The cleaning action helps clear out any oxidation on the parts that prevents the solder from adhering to the copper. (Keep in mind though that the simple ...


3

I think you'd end up running into a whole boat load of issues before you could even begin talking about efficiency. The first and most pressing being the rapid condensation that would occur within seconds of circulating the cold liquid (leaving you with a whole host of other DIY problems you'd need to work out). Which, I imagine would need to be somewhere ...


3

you can just inject hydraulic cement into the void and let cure. then anchor your flange with a tapcon type screw. or just inject the hydraulic cement and then insert a screw into the wet cement. when it cures, it will lock the screw in place.


3

The flange and accompanying bolts hold the toilet firmly to the floor and keeps the seal between the toilet and the floor. Without the flange or if it is broken, he would have to attach the toilet to the subfloor with wood screws, and if the floor is rotting out, those won't last long. Sounds like it will need further repairs sometime soon. Good luck!


3

While you might be able to find an epoxy our something else out on the market your best option is replace the valve. If it was a failure in the casting process then you'll never be sure that another part of the valve won't fail. While it might be a pain it would be better to just replace it and have the peace of mind that you shouldn't have any future issues....


2

You have 3 or more options. #1 get a shark bite to go from galvanized to copper. #2 You need to go to a plumbing store and get a galvanized nipple and then extend your copper to the point the pipe screws into a coupling or other fitting. #3 If you don't want to extend your copper get an exact measurement and have a new piece of pipe cut and threaded. #1 is ...


2

First off it kind of looks like the packing nut and associated seal that it squeezes against the valve stem is missing. You could look into whether you could locate that part off a replacement valve. The strange washer arrangement on your current valve handle suggests that it may not be the original type for this faucet. It may be that a previous owner tried ...


2

The kitchen sink is not vented well enough. Does the sink have an air admittance valve? It could be clogged. Otherwise it is just poor venting design. My bathroom sink does the same thing every time the dishwasher dumps. It is not a major issue as long as you use the sink frequently it will refill the trap with water. Good luck!


2

I've heard of using a layer of oil to prevent evaporation or discourage mosquitoes or things like that... but that requires levels be set so the oil stays above the pump inlet at all times, and it assumes that some loss of oil into the exhaust is OK (which is one reason it might need replacing). If the town said no, I'd say it's a reasonable position for ...


2

I finished digging it up. It was just an oval piece of concrete (about 3 inch deep) that had the edges wrapped with metal. 0_0 so I guess trash is the closest answer. Wish I knew what it was t here for...it seemed deliberately placed.


2

It depends on how much you want to spend, how old your water heater is and what kind of water you have. The aluminum rods are usually the cheapest followed by magnesium. The combination rods I don't have much faith in as the least noble metal is eaten away first. powered rods that will last a lifetime are very expensive due to the platinum wire used. Your ...


2

You can move the water heater to just about anywhere that would be convenient. However, it is not a good idea to reduce the size down from 3/4" to 1/2" directly off of the tank. You will likely run into issues with water pressure. In branch plumbing, it is best to keep the size of the pipe at its maximum until it branches off to a specific fixture. Most ...


2

Yes, You have neglected to show how any particular sized water softener would fit onto a shelf table size of 15" x 20"; let alone get it into that space. Also you will need a riser on the softener side of the P-Trap that you have shown there. Seems to me that there will also need to be a guaranteed airgap between softener drain line and P-Trap riser. If ...


1

You are on the right track. Assuming you want to work on a single zone, you will need to: Shut off your boiler using the switch (potentially you could disconnect just one zone and leave your boiler running for the sake of other zones, but in general it's simpler to just turn off the system unless you're doing extensive work during the winter). Disconnect ...


1

Alternate opinion here. People do not use hot water continuously. They have moments of activity when they shower, wash clothes or do dishes. The rest of the time, the water in the pipes cools off. You know the drill: How long the hot water takes to get hot, depends on the inventory (volume) of water in the pipe. Pipe volume is the square of diameter. ...


1

Turn off the main supply and connect the supply line(s) to the faucet. You will need a brass tee, crimps, and the connector for the pipe to the faucet, and some pipe. If you want to use a silcock instead of a sink, you still need to attach it to something. I would start there (build something to hold the silcock), and attach the pipe to it once I figured ...


1

It sounds like he's telling you flat out, and in no uncertain terms, that this is a temporary hack. He is telling you the floor under the toilet has some serious problems. He is saying no one can fix the toilet properly without those floor repairs getting done. Using two wax rings is perfectly fine. He probably used two that fit well together. They ...


1

It has not been winterized properly. Enersol FAQs have some great tips regarding "removable end-caps on the roof" that need to be opened. EnerSol FAQs


1

MAPP gas is the way to go. It burns hotter, so It will heat the pipe faster. It will even heat the pipe if there's a bit of water in the line, something that propane will not do. If you're worried about burning surrounding materials, you can use a heat shield. There are all different types, sizes, and styles from many different manufacturers. This is ...


1

You're going to have to put a trap in there somewhere. If there's enough space in the cabinet, you could do something similar to this... NOTE:: All horizontal pipe sloped at 1/4" per foot.* If not, and you have access to the plumbing below. You could reroute the plumbing, so the it comes up the back wall instead.


1

You'd need a closed system with a serious dose of antifreeze to get cold enough for significant cooling. Radiators usually run at least 40C above the desired room temperature to provide heat. To get the same amount of heat transfer into the radiators for cooling, the circulating water would have to be as cold as a freezer (-20C). Possibly by running 24 ...


1

I am an amateur but it looks to me like it just needs an O ring and new plastic ring like the video below shows. under kitchen sink diagram http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/how-to-repair-a-spray-hose-1.jpg looks like it needs an "O" ring and silicone grease. http://citykitchensseattle.com/tag/kitchen-faucets-leaking-at-base I had no experience at all and ...


1

One way you can fix it is by tapping in a 23mm socket into the drain. Then attach a ratchet to the socket and twist it out.



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