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12

Pipe joint compound or thread sealant. Should be near soldering stuff, plumbers putty, PVC Glue, Teflon tape, etc. Comes in a tube or plastic jar. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Oatey-8-oz-Pipe-Joint-Compound-154202/100204007


10

Turn the water off, and remove it. Those things are rubbish, and always leak eventually. If you need a valve there, cut out the damaged section of pipe, and install a proper tee and valve. If you don't need it, cut out the damaged section of pipe and install a coupling. If you're not an expert solderer, They make push-fit fittings (SharkBite® is the well ...


8

All sources may be found in the image descriptions. Products are shown for educational purpose only and are not to be viewed as endorsement. Intending to include all major North American manufacturers, any additions are welcomed. Pipe Dope Trade Names: TFE Paste PTFE Pipe Thread Sealant Pipe Thread Sealant Pipe Joint Compound Pipe Thread ...


8

Pipe dope is a general term used to describe any lubricant, sealant, or adhesive designed to aid in making pipe joints leak proof. It can be used to describe dopes in various forms, including pastes, tapes, putties, etc. Within the plumbing trade, the term "pipe dope" is commonly used to describe paste dopes exclusively. Using a general term such as ...


7

As long as the attached timer is shut off and no water is flowing the pressure in the water line will be no different than what it would be when the spigot is turned off. You water bill will reflect how much water that you actually use. The only way it could go up astronomically would be if the timer broke off the spigot or failed in an open mode where ...


6

It's a self-piercing saddle valve like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB76LXrYKsU . If you're familiar with electronics, it works a lot like the so-called "vampire tap" for coax cable. Regardless, it's a quick and easy solution in the short-term, but they tend not to last. Because they are cheap, they tend to fail easily, and because they are ...


5

There is a tool that is made for cutting out the PVC pipe in a joint so that it may be used again. That tool may be useful to square up the end of the pipe in this case if you were able to hold the tool inline with the pipe while it shaves off the high part of the pipe. This is what one example of the tool looks like. These are used to chucking up the ...


5

There were some good suggestions to replace/remove the saddle valve, and I'll likely do that eventually. For now, though, I was able to cap it off with a 1/4" compression cap, similar to the one pictured below.


4

April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


4

If you look closely at the valve inlets, they are designed with a 1/2" male iron pipe thread (MPT) for a threaded connection, OR you can solder 1/2" copper pipe directly to the inside of the threaded fitting. It's made to accomodate either method. You do not need any additional fittings. You need to be careful though, there are o-rings and teflon seals ...


3

Being that you are repairing an unpressurized drain, the squareness of the pipe end is not nearly as critical as a pressurized supply line. Just make sure to clean and prime the pipe prior to applying solvent cement. Additionally, if you have a level handy, lay it across the drain once the fitting is in place to to ensure proper placement. Side note: It ...


3

First of all, do you in fact have PVC pipes? Lots of older houses have cast iron end-to-end, so nothing at all to worry about in that case. Even if you do have PVC, I don't think there's any serious concern, with the very slight possibility of an effect the drain trap (if any) right under the sink. While continuous immersion in 100° C water might soften ...


3

The diverter valve built into your faucet is downstream from the faucet valve that is designed to hold back "line" pressure. The diverter shunts water toward the spray head when you open the spray head valve, and directs it toward the fixed spout otherwise. The faucet sprayer head/nozzle is not designed to hold back system pressure. They would have to be ...


3

It's a self tapping valve, usually to provide water to a fridge. You can either replace it or eliminate it (use a coupling instead).


3

There are basically two solutions: 1. Remove the saddle valve and replace with a coupling You need to do this if it is leaking from the rubber flashing around the pipe. 2. Cap the Valve You can unscrew the valve stem retaining nut and cap the top and side of the valve with compression nuts as described above. You can do this if, for instance, the valve ...


3

could be the cold has shrunk something, maybe rubber isolation, and the water was able to go around it (something like that caused the challenger explosion) could be the cold has cooled down the neighbours ceiling and the moisture in the room condensed there, like when you use air conditioning


3

Yeah, a handy DIY person could do the re-routing of those hot and cold water line connections. You would have to deal with shutting off the water supply, cutting out all the old stuff and then re-plumbing in with new piping and fittings. Hopefully you get all the parts that you would need in one initial trip to the big box store. Do be aware as you get ready ...


3

40-50 years is a fair lifespan. I've seen plenty of houses with galvi that was 60+ years old without it failing, the real issue to me is if you want to wait until it fails to replace it. Not greatly accelerated the process, no. Yes. Potentially and at decent expense. It depends on the size of the water service, condition of the piping, and access point. ...


2

Just read the brochure, its all in there. On-Grade Drains on-grade floor drains are for use in ground-level applications, or where a waterproofing membrane is not needed. Flashing Drains Flashing drains are typically installed when a waterproofing membrane is used to protect finished areas under the drain. you are going to want ...


2

no - pipe dope can pretty much be used everywhere. its not necessary though on anything but a thread to thread seal. most vanities nowadays use flexible supply lines that have compression type fittings at either end with a rubber seal in them. its not necessary on that connection at all.


2

It is better to keep a hot water hydronic heating system full of water all the time. This keeps air out, and prevents the inside of the radiators from rusting (assuming these are traditional cast iron rads). Recirculating the same water also helps limit the introduction of minerals from your water supply, so your rads and boiler won't clog up with mineral ...


2

Have you tried an open-end wrench? Such as this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrench#/media/File%3A2008-04-14_Chrome-Vanadium_Wrenches.jpg It won't fit flat onto the nut but it looks like you could get a good grip on it at a shallow angle. The end of a spanner (adjustable wrench) is quite a bit thicker and harder to maneuver in tight spaces. ...


2

In the US you can almost always (almost... there's certainly exceptions) rely on hot being on the left and cold being on the right. This will be the case for washing machine hookups, bath tubs and faucets. I'm not sure if that is a code requirement anywhere, but it is almost universally used. Switching sides would have safety implications because someone ...


2

I believe you want this in place, so before removing it, I'd check with the manufacturer to see if they permit it. I can think of at least three reasons you'd want the drain line secured at this height: Drain hoses for appliances like dishwashers and washing machines that run into a sink drain are installed above, or as close to the top of the sink drain ...


2

You could make a manifold by adding a T to the copper and 2 90's so they both come out where you would like It looks like there is enough room to do this.


2

PVC gets soft when heated. As Tester101 commented above, 140°F is the maximum temperature for pvc. Boiling water is 212° F. I have bent many PVC pipes with pipe heaters for running cable (schedule 80 takes about 2-3 minutes to get soft in a pipe heater). They don't bust, but they certainly can and will bend, which is obviosly not ideal for joints or ...


2

Sometimes when you open older valves, they get stuck open. If you can't get the valve to reset, you'll have to replace it.


2

everyone just calm down. you guys are looking for an arrow industries 05-57L-4-4 http://arrowindustries.com/content/catalog/2015/Arrow%20web%20catalog%20sec%20g.pdf


2

You have to cut the pipe. When re-installing you should put in unions instead of just couplings so that removing the pump is possible without disturbing the system, as the original installers should have. Since your piping is pretty tight you will need to do some re-piping. Here's an example:


2

To add anything to the water heater you will need to turn the water off and drain the pressure in the lines. After this there are 2 choices; Pull the anode probably the best idea because it may have dissolved. The 2nd choice would be to pull the supply line and add there. I have never had this problem that flushing and replacing the anode did not fix. After ...



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