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7

If you look at the picture below you will see pex tubing. This has become the industry norm in some areas of the US - I know some countries have adopted similar things and some haven't. The compression fittings are supposedly made to last longer than than a soldered copper joints - jury is still out on that. Let's see what complaints there are in 10-20 ...


6

What you have is not solid. There's a foam or cellular interior to the pipe with two thin layers of sold ABS on the outside. It costs less and weighs less than solid pipe. Thus it's popular at home stores that compete on price. Not every jurisdiction allows use of cellular pipe. However it's common in the USA. You need to be careful about backfilling ...


4

No. You will need about 1 inch. It will hit the stop at about 1 inch and slightly (very slightly) pull out after it hits the stop. This is something that you don't want to mess with because if you don't have the correct length the bite action won't take. Good thing is unlike a bad solder job on copper you will notice that you didn't hit the stop right ...


4

Your external list is pretty good, what's missing is an internal list: water shut off valves(stem leaks) Connections between stop valves and mixing valve Stem leaks on mixing valve Shower arm and tub outlet extension: leaks at elbow inside wall It is unusual for these sources to end up on the floor, outside the tub, unless your bath is over a slab. ...


3

Just resealing everything is a bad idea because you might, for example, just trap the leaking water somewhere you can't see it. The water will still leak and cause damage or mold. You really need to find out where the water is coming from. Turn on the shower and sit outside of it to find the leak.


3

The overflow tube drains directly into the bowl, not the tank. The only way I can think that it would prevent the tank from filling is if it was cracked or had a hole in it and allowed tank water to drain into the bowl. If this was the case, you would notice the fill valve cycling if it was a slow leak or never shutting off if it were a large leak. The ...


2

The overflow tube leads to the bowl. It prevents the tank from overflowing, by directing extra water to the bowl. Nothing prevents the bowl from overflowing, other than the fact that once the water level reaches a certain height the toilet flushes. If the toilet is clogged, the bowl can overflow. If that tube didn't spray water in the overflow tube, the ...


2

That tube provides water to refill the bowl. Without it, you'd only refill the tank.


2

That should be easy. Start by figuring out how much additional height you need. Use a pipe wrench to loosen the faceted collar at the top of the trap, and the standpipe should just pull up and out of that fitting. Take it to a store and tell them you need a piece the same size but however-much longer. You may have to get something a bit longer than that and ...


1

EPA discussion of waste treatment with lime One common sanitizer for sewage is lime. A farm supply would have it. You must layer the dirt and the lime, a 1:10 ratio (1 inch of lime to 10" of dirt) Care must be used against touching or breathing the lime directly. Hydrating and mixing each layer (or lift) will ensure the dispersal and neutralizing the ...


1

Your inspector should be able to grant a waiver for existing conditions if code compliance is a concern. If that is the case, I would wait and ask him/her for a solution that is acceptable. Hopefully something a bit shy of bumping the basement wall out 6", LOL. You could put the 1/2" foam behind, than cover the pipes with split foam pipe insulation. I try ...


1

Cut the foam into manageable pieces and slide into place. Use cans of spray foam insulation to fill the cracks in the sheets of foam caused by cutting. Or spray foam the entire cavity and forget the rigid foam.


1

Given multiple issues there, I think the correct and possibly simplest, albeit messy, solutiion is going to be cutting the floor open and putting the pipes where you need them. Concrete is not forever.


1

If the hot water is hooked up to your faucets, then hot water should eventually come out regardless of the re-circulation stuff. That is, unless the check valve is the wrong way or the pump isn't letting water flow. Then you would just get cold water. EDIT I see from your comment that the system was previously working and no work has been done. The check ...


1

I suspect the sound is from the drain pipes, and comes from a leaky toilet, beacause that's the most common thing that has a stored reservoir of water to keep leaking after you shut off the main valve. You might try leaving the main water valve shut off for several hours. If the sound eventually stops, go around and look in your toilets to see if any are ...


1

Despite being a different brand, the outgoing washer used the same inlet valve assembly. I was able to swap the parts, and the stripped inlet is going to the metal recycling center with the old washer.


1

I wouldn't bother unless you're going to have your water turned off for a couple days. In that case, turn off the water heater itself. You'll have a hard time using any hot water with the main turned off, so it is mainly a consideration of whether or not it's worth it to keep the water in the tank hot over the period you won't be using it.


1

I had the exact same problem under my bathroom sink. Here's a picture of how I resolved it. The first elbow off the sink is 1.5" because I couldn't find a 1.25" female-to-female elbow in my local Home Depot. I used a 1.25" sized compression washer in the larger elbow to get the smaller 1.25" elbow to fit snugly. Works great! You should be able to do the same ...


1

From personal experience my husband and I made the mistake of installing a new washing machine in our 2nd floor laundry room without properly placing a pan underneath the machine. We were thinking it was new so there was no chance of it leaking s at least not for a long time. Boy were we wrong! Three days later, a disaster filled the laundry room floor, out ...


1

You could just leave it alone... I got fined $1500, and had to dig it up and replace it... for cutting mine down below 42 inches.



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