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18

This is a very controversial topic. Some plumbers swear that you must seal the toilet to the floor, while others swear that you should not seal the toilet to the floor. Some guys never do it, some guys always do it, and some guys only do it depending on the flooring used. It also appears that some toilet manufacturers mention it in the installation ...


7

The actual plumbing seal doesn't have anything to do with caulking around the base of the toilet. That's all to do with the wax (typically) ring where the drain pipe and the toilet fit together, and the bolts that hold the toilet down to the floor. Caulking around the base will look a little nicer, and it'll keep water and cleaning fluids from seeping under ...


4

How many splines are on the broach, how long is it and what's its diameter? As according to faucetpartsplus.com, that's all you need to get started. They have an entire list for spline counts, listing them (below) to specific manufacturers. If you can't figure it out, they suggest sending them a photo, as they're very interested in selling you parts; ...


3

I think the best way to prevent water issues would be to move the outlet and/or valves. If that is not preferable, at least ensure that the outlet is protected by a GFI, or install a GFI receptacle at that location. You could also use a weatherproof "in-use" cover. Keep a close eye on your hoses and valves and repair at first sign of leak. Turn those faucets ...


3

Your vanity plan should have front side doors in line with where the sink is located. Then the drawers should be off to the left or right side where there is plenty of height and space toward the back to accommodate their placement. There are multiple reasons to not put drawers in the vanity under the sink area: People stand in front of the vanity at the ...


3

The hot water baseboard heating will be heating the room mostly due to radiative surfaces that conduct the heat out of the water pipe and into the air of the room. For this to work there needs to be allowance for the air in the room to naturally move from the heater area and into the room. If you cover it up it will not be heating the room in the same way. ...


3

Check the temperature of the main home water supply pipe, and compare it to other pipes in the house. Nothing else will be colder, but the other cold water pipes shouldn't be much warmer. If you find a presumed cold water pipe that's significantly warmer than the main supply, then you can search for the source of the heat. If, for instance, the washing ...


3

It's not mentioned in instructions because a professional wouldn't do it that way if they had a choice. You need to get the water out of the line to heat it enough to melt the solder. That's easy enough when the pipe has been cut apart, but less so when you open the valve several inches away. While heating, the pipe will get soft and you risk deforming it ...


2

It's fine as long as the copper you're soldering to is bright and clean. When you make a cut you just get a new edge, but it's the outer surface of the pipe, not the edge, that the solder bonds to. De-solder the old spigot, clean up the pipe with some light sandpaper or emery cloth, and solder away. There's plenty of YouTube videos on the process if you're ...


2

This answer by @Tester101 says that you can desolder, clean, and resolder a pipe fitting without cutting. I would also follow his advice of practicing on spare parts before doing the real deal.


2

You use plastic bushings. I couldn't find a photo with pipe, but here's one with electrical: This gives you the benefit of separation of materials and also a 'slip joint' to handle the expansion/contraction of pipes so they're not making lots of noises rubbing against framing members. To attach the pipe to the stud, you can use pipe clamps like this:


2

I only do it if the floor is uneven as in stone tile. It's way more difficult to do a repair later if the toilet is stuck to the floor.


1

Use copper pipe through the wall. It could be easily adapted with fittings for PEX on the interior and PVC for your exterior post bib runs. You can secure it to the wall with "drop-ear" fittings that have tabs with screw holes. With the tee below, solder a 90 with a short length of copper through the wall with a threaded adapter for PEX. On the other end ...


1

Your pressure tank is what is considered "water-logged". If it is a bladder tank, the bladder inside the tank may need to be re-pressurized or perhaps the bladder tank needs to be replaced. There is an air valve on top to do this, if it only needs re-pressurizing. To my recollection, and I may be wrong, and possibly your specs may differ, the tank, with no ...


1

That screw seems to have found the magic spot and I think it's unlikely to happen again, however you might want to somehow strap a protection plate around the Tee; I wouldn't worry about the rest of the pipe.


1

3570 has shut off valves on the valve itself. Allows you to swap out 1225 cartridge without shutting off water to house


1

Trim the tailpiece to fit. A pipe cutter would be a bit more suitable than a hacksaw, but if you only have a hacksaw, just clean up well with a file after sawing. New tailpieces come quite long so they can be trimmed to fit.


1

Little bit of sound-proofing knowledge: People tend to think noise travels in a straight line from it's source to the reciever. It does, but a lot of it travels through indirect pathways. Drive down the road with your window all the way open and listen to the noise levels. Now drive down the road with your window only open 1/2" and listen. Now drive ...


1

I would install a house water filter before it branches off to any faucets or the water heater. This should capture any dirt/sand/rust in the water.


1

I will potentially be drinking the same water that flows back in the well after the frostless hydrant is shut off - yes? No. Freezeless faucets drain their water back into the ground at their base below the frost line when turned off, NOT IN TO THE SUPPLY. The freezeless facuet drains this water so the pipes above the frost line have no water to ...


1

Generally you would just secure the PEX with some pipe clams near the valve and that would be good enough. The valve just hangs there in mine and I usually grab a pipe with one hand when I turn it.


1

Replacing the current pipe nipple with one that is slightly shorter is the best way to go here. The thing to do is to simply cut off the length of the current nipple by the requisite amount and then get that end threaded slightly more. The re-threading step is necessary because the pipe nipple threads are a tapered thread. If you do not have the tools to ...


1

You'll find the crimp fittings are a lot more available. I have found no local retail plumbing stores in my entire metropolis which sell the expansion style of anything. Also, there is no warranty on the expansion type unless you're certified so I'm told. Not that warranty claims on any plumbing install are that common or plausible anyway. A lot of plumbers ...


1

As I understand it, the expander only works on PEX-A tubing which is more expensive and not as durable/chemical resistant. I have found that in many instances I had to make a connection in a tight space and needed the compact compression ring tool. The expander has the advantage of working before the connection is made, so I suppose if you plan ahead you ...


1

I don't claim to know California building code. That said: I don't think the building code cares what you do with your aquarium piping, so long as it doesn't connect to your residential plumbing. Do what you want with that top-off tube. As for electrical, if you want to run wire then it's a bigger deal and there are lots of rules you'll need to follow. Too ...


1

I would count on main valve - it cound just broke. I had similiar situation last year, but in my case it was that i couldn't close the main valve. If every output - even the ones that You didn't touch - gives same response (little or no pressure), it is highly probable that main valve broke down. I would suggest calling city plumbers (as this is main ...


1

Expansion tanks absorb excess pressure, they don't maintain system pressures. I think what you're looking for is a pressure tank. While similar in design to an expansion tank, a pressure tank serves a different purpose and is typically much larger. If installed properly, a pressure tank can help keep system pressure more stable during high demand. ...


1

I know that this is a very old post but I came across it recently when I started having the problem. Not sure what exactly causes it seeing as I didn't have issues before in previous houses. Only thing I can think of is that the sink in this house gets a little more foot traffic between me and my roommate. Anyway. Also tried a couple drain products with no ...



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