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11

If you are on a public water supply, there may be water test results already published on a quarterly basis. If you are doing your own testing, generally an environmental testing company or consultant (rather than a plumber) - in many cases you can save money if you can follow directions carefully and take the samples yourself, for testing at their ...


11

If you're going to flush the hot water heater you might as well turn it off and then take a shower or do a load of laundry. That way the water will only be lukewarm when you flush the tank and you won't throw away water you already paid to heat. Then you don't need to worry about the type of hose (or worry about spilling scalding water on yourself).


8

Get two bladder-style drain cleaners. Insert one down each sink. Turn them both on simultaneously and they'll inflate until they block up the sinks, at which point they'll fill the plumbing in between the two and use pressure to push the blockage down the only remaining path. If this drain proves to be problematic in the long-term, then you'll have to ...


7

While there are "hot water hoses" and you'll pay a pretty penny for them if you want more than the standard 5 feet or so that washing machine hoses are, you can use an ordinary garden hose. Why? No pressure. You don't (or shouldn't) have a nozzle on the hose, so it should not be subject to much pressure. Also, you are draining from the bottom of the tank, ...


6

The most obvious choice is to modify the plumbing at the point indicated below to allow for a cleanout plug to be added. The fitting shown would be replaced with one that looks like this: In such installation the straight through part of the Wye Tee fitting is closed off with a plug which is easily removed to insert a cleanout snake. Adjusting the ...


6

As @tyler durden comments, this may be an issue with the drain, but it is very unlikely that there is no trap. A more likely scenario is that a partial blockage or obstruction of either the drain line or a vent line is causing a siphon action that is preventing the trap from maintaining a water seal. Another possibility is that one or more drains have been ...


3

Coathanger, cut into a wire, with a hook on the end might work. Push the hooked end past the stuck brush, keeping the hook near the perimiter of the pipe. Rotate the hanger 90° so the hook is under, and engages, the stuck toilet brush. Pull up on the end of the coathanger with a pliers or vicegrips.


3

First as Henry Jackson mentions the low flow shower heads are part of the the water consumption laws passed in the US. I am not sure how the US compares to other countries. I have done construction in France and in Spain and nobody has mentioned this to me and I never really thought about the pressure after installation - if I were to guess they seem to ...


3

It's not "backwards" or a "mistake" at all - it's perfectly standard for dual (separate hot/cold control) faucets. In a sink deployment, you pull the outside (away from the faucet) of the handle forward to open, and push it back to close - that requires the hot and cold to close in "different directions" from a clock-wise perspective - which is perfectly ...


3

Alright. Your first problem is the "cheap and unmarked" part -- two prong appliances can be safe, but only if they are "double insulated" or Class II. Such an appliance will have a square-within-a-square symbol on its model number label, alongside any testing marks that may have been applied. Since this pump of yours lacks any independent equipment ...


3

First guess, it's just junk from the pipes: you didn't properly bleed the system after having used a shut-off; remove aerators, run water. Next, a faucet with a sprayer has a flexible line; each end having a grommet that may have deteriorated (as with all other flexible lines). Lastly, if the valves are old enough, their packing may have deteriorated to ...


3

Short answer is, because the 1/2" flexible tubing is short enough to not cause a major pressure loss. If you ran 1/2" line the whole way, it would be too much pressure drop. Pressure drop across a pipeline is a function of all the friction losses added together. These include "major" losses (the official terminology, not mine) from the friction with the ...


2

The question I would ask is, was the shutoff value in the basement off? If the valve in the basement is shutoff it does not matter if the hose had a nozzle or not. I do not know where you are located, but if the temperature is above 45, turn it on slowly and see if it leaks, but if the shutoff valve was turned off, I think you are in good shape.


2

The usual remarks about the safety of scalding water anywhere in your system go here. Physics says the life of your tank will decrease, but not enough for you to notice. Everything else being equal, hot water has a slightly higher pressure, but expansion tanks are there to deal with that very problem. The one place you might notice a difference is in ...


2

Remove everything currently under the sink that is not glued and use a rags to plug the drain pipes. Next, let the counter guys do there work and install the sink. There is nothing to do until they are done. After they are done, follow the install instructions on the disposal. After that is done, mount a new p-trap kit from one of the drain pipes to the ...


2

In the US the low-flow shower heads are mandated by federal law, so it may not be easy to find a non-restricted one. I am not a lawyer but I would think that advertising the un-restricted flow rate would be a subversion of the law and therefore unlikely to be legal. If you want a non-low-flow shower head I would just take the restrictor cap out of any ...


1

I looked at what was available, didn't like any of it, and simply ordered enough Tees (3/4 x 1/2 x 3/4 mostly, with a few 3/4 x 3/4 x 3/4) and valves to build my own from PEX (using a ring of 3/4" PEX as the "manifold."


1

You will need to adapt from PVC to hose thread if using hose thread quick disconnects. If you can find pipe thread (on the fixed side) quick disconnects that would be one less fitting to adapt, as PVC to pipethread is a standard fitting, and I'm not aware of any direct PVC to hose thread fittings (may exist, I've never seen one) so I expect you'd need a ...


1

Unscrew the white compression nut and take a look at the sealing ring that is under it. These can get hard with age or over compressed and lose shape and thus lose its ability to squeeze tightly to the down drop pipe from the sink drain. If this is the case it is an indication that the sealing ring needs to be replaced. The common type of the sealing ring ...


1

The white fitting should be on top of a small compression ring, so when reassembling the pipes you would add the white female threaded fitting, the compression ring (thin side pointed down), and then the black male threaded side of the fitting. When you tighten this by hand, the compression ring will get squeezed between the two pipes and make a water tight ...


1

Water hammer, no air quotes needed. Noise in pipes from the momentum of moving water, suddenly stopped. Draining the pipes is providing temporary air bubbles which cushion it. Water hammer arrestors, either in the form of a few feet of capped vertical pipe at the end of the run to hold a more lasting bubble, or spring/plunger/diaphragm/piston units sold ...


1

It's called "water hammer", and it's caused by the physical momentum of the water in the pipes being dissipated when the flow stops suddenly. By draining the system, you're creating an air bubble somewhere in your plumbing that provides a cushion for the momentum, eliminating the banging, but this bubble is leaking away somehow, which causes the banging to ...


1

You need to use tubing that is rated for hydrogen gas. McMaster-Carr may have some. Likely you'll have to use stainless steel or an exotic plastic like teflon. Normal hardware-store tubing will react, possibly violently, when used with such fluids/gasses in them. If you're cracking water into hydrogen / oxygen, that line will need to also be customized for ...


1

Probably enough that your guests can easily see that it's not clear when their dog is looking for a convenient drinking bowl, going for the most obvious inappropriate use of toilet flushing water as potable. Alternatively (and probably requiring a bit more dye) would you notice if you were handed a glass of the stuff that it was blue, or green, not clear? I ...


1

The grating is likely part of a threaded barrel that sleeves through the porcelain of the sink and comes out the bottom. This barrel has threads on it under the sink, and a wide and thin nut is threaded onto them squishing the barrel and grating against the sink and securing it. To remove it, disconnect the P-trap beneath the sink first (have a bucket ...


1

The whole purpose of the Woodford Model 17 faucet is to have year around use without bursting. Per their website: The freeze-less Model 17 is designed and intended for year-round residential irrigation purposes regardless of outside temperature. This faucet will not rupture from freezing when the valve is shut off and the hose is removed. The Model 17 ...


1

If I remember right, the kind with a set screw have a rubber grommet and don't need tape (if there is a threaded connection then you should use some). Use clear silicone where it meets the wall and leave a tiny gap at the bottom for drainage.


1

Not having fresh water flowing through it won't cause any particular harm since the water will deposit all of its salts/metals early on and just sit the rest of the time, so long as water stays in the system. However the right thing to do since the dwelling will be unoccupied (the only reason it's allowable to disconnect water service) would be to turn off ...


1

You will need to contact the city to have the municipal water shut off while the repair is made. A leak like this can quickly get worse and before you know it, your entire house can be flooded with no way to shut off the water. If the leak gets worse and you can't get a hold of the city, you can call the city police on their non-emergency number and they ...


1

The issue was indeed a siphon, and it was actually a very silly cause. Upon removing the fill tube, I noticed the water level on there was at the same level as the water level in the tank. But hold on a second, why would one see a water level on the fill tube? Well it turns out that at some point, the clip that goes on top of the overflow pipe which is ...



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