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5

I think the best way to prevent water issues would be to move the outlet and/or valves. If that is not preferable, at least ensure that the outlet is protected by a GFI, or install a GFI receptacle at that location. You could also use a weatherproof "in-use" cover. Keep a close eye on your hoses and valves and repair at first sign of leak. Turn those faucets ...


4

Since you have a flue I assume it is either gas/propane or oil fired. Most water heaters have cover near the base to service the burner or the igniter. First shut off the fuel source. If you remove the cover you should be able to look inside with the aid of a flashlight. Most burners are round and you may find that the cap has fallen into the center and may ...


4

Pressure Switch I've never seen a "safety cut-off" on a pressure system before, but typically the switching is done by a single box (known as a "pressure switch"). Pretty much all of them (at least from the last ~20 years) look something like this: The large nut is used to control the pressure (both cut-in, and cut-out) and the small one controls the ...


3

Generally, law questions are off-topic, so I'll answer in a way that's broadly applicable. For the most part, building components that are no longer code-compliant are grandfathered in until work needs to be done on them. So if you have a section of galvanized pipe that's rusted or clogged, you'll have to replace that section with copper or something else ...


2

Follow the manufacturer's instructions. New and higher priced dishwashers are more frequently starting to connect to cold water. The better dishwashers fill with so little water that the hot doesn't arrive anyway unless you let the sink water run like in the shower. Better energy efficient washers heat their own water to the proper temperature for better ...


2

Hole saw out the center and cut a pie shaped piece out with a saws all all the way to the threads but not into the threads, then with a hammer and punch knock out the pie shaped piece and remove the rest with channel lock pliers. Do it every day as a professional plumber. And if the threads are different stop at a local plumbing outfit and get a lead plug.


2

X-ray? Sure they do this often in commercial buildings but it's probably well outside of something that is cost effective in a house. A metal detector would locate the rebar and a tone generator could be used on a wire in the conduit in order to locate it.


2

The joints are there in the wall as they can't occur within the slab. They split the main supply to the bathroom into branches for the sink, tub/shower, and toilet.


2

Would applying a safety factor to the maximum PSI in the PVC lines allow me to safely use PVC? Yes it probably would, as long as this is a personal project at your home or property. If this is in a workplace then it is likely you would be breaking the law by using unprotected PVC. I would regulate it to no more than what is necessary to provide desirable ...


2

The best I can suggest is remove that old wood,it may attract insects as well,I used closed cell spray foam to seal my numerous entry holes,and the closed cell should help stabilize the pipe.If you have acess you could stabilize it with a bracket or hanger if its in the crawl space or basement.Good luck


1

God, I hate garden hose connectors. They are complete crap. The main problem in your case is that the male end is too shallow. You fix this by using a file or grinder to grind down whatever is preventing the coupler from screwing completely on.


1

If it's leaking there, on a brand new hose with brand-new washer, I'm going to have to bet on the threads on the hose spigot being damaged. That should be evident if you look at them, and may be amenable to fixing with a triangular file. The hose is not tightened, so the rubber seal is not sealing on the end of the spigot. If it's cross-threaded, or ...


1

Looks like it says "BRASS" on it, I'd guess American Brass. Identify your stem, here. It may not leak anymore if you have tightened it, but now you need to loosen it a little to let it operate. I appreciate your need to be gentile, but I'd swap the entire valve out. One thing though, is that nipple NPT? It kinda looks like machine thread. Safest way to ...


1

check to make sure the valve going to the dishwasher wasn't accidentally closed when you changed the faucet. Follow the flex pipe from the dishwasher to the valve and make sure the valve is open.


1

It depends on the make and model of the valve. If you look at the size of the water passage (sometimes referred to as the "port") you will get an idea of the size of the restriction. I have found that cheap imported 1/4 turn stop valves frequently have a small port. Whereas higher quality valves (more $$) may have a larger port or may even be "full port".


1

My intuition tells me this is the fill valve, it stopped when the fill line / valve were de-pressured overnight.


1

The way you get a new stem is to get a whole new sillcock/hose bibb. If the stem is that corroded, the body probably is as well, so it's likely to not seal right even if you could fine one to match a specific 34 year old valve body (which seems like a bit of a stretch.) If you can identify your particular valve you MIGHT find a specialist "repair parts" ...


1

Use copper pipe through the wall. It could be easily adapted with fittings for PEX on the interior and PVC for your exterior post bib runs. You can secure it to the wall with "drop-ear" fittings that have tabs with screw holes. With the tee below, solder a 90 with a short length of copper through the wall with a threaded adapter for PEX. On the other end ...


1

Some alternative possibilities would be: Build a separate (waterproof) vertical conduit to contain and isolate the water system - both incoming pipes and what looks to be a drain on the right of the image. This would not need to be very large, perhaps 1 foot square could be enough. Move the water valves down as low as possible. The rationale being that the ...


1

It's very difficult to tell what your existing pipe is like, as there's a shower attached to it. However, I think your problem is that the existing pipe diameter is larger than the UK shower connection? In which case you need a reducing coupler. Here's an example. But a) your existing pipe may be 1" rather than 22mm; and b) the fitting at the larger ...


1

The faucet needs to be disassembled from the top. I guess you already know how to do that part. If there is calcium build up visible go ahead and use CLR to clean off the build up. Now the important part, get a high quality, pure if possible, Silicone Grease. When I say “pure” what I am saying is make sure it is 90-100% silicone. If it is silicone mixed ...


1

In my case, it was tree roots blocking the sewer line. (See the preceding post about air out). Over time, the glug got worse and eventually morphed into bad drainage for the sink/tub/toilet. Cleared the sewer line and the glugs were gone.


1

I had the same problem and on another site it said to try plunging the toilet. I did that a few times and it worked! No more tub gurgling!


1

If the smell starts only after you turn on the water, it is probably coming from the overflow. Take the stopper out and block the drain with a plastic baggy with a wet rag in it. This has to block the overflow drain where it meets the regular drain. Now pour the foaming snake, or other drain cleaner into the overflow. Let stand then reconnect the ...



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