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10

It's a balancing valve, and you have probably got the guts of it confused with excessive unscrewing. You may be able to sort them out if you undo the BIG nut and take them out. if not, a heating professional can. The purpose of this type of valve is to balance flow between heating loops, so it will also need to be re-adjusted once reassembled (or replaced.) ...


7

I share Paulster2's concern that your plumbing isn't properly vented, or there's a blockage in the vent. You can try to snake the vent from the roof or running a garden hose down it to clear it out. Signs of insufficient venting include drains that start slow and then gurgle after at the end, toilets that bubble, especially on lower levels, and traps that ...


5

The go to solution for this, is almost always a plunger. Make sure you use a toilet plunger, as it's designed to make a seal with the hole in toilets. Toilet Plunger If that doesn't work, you could try a toilet auger. Toilet Auger If the clog still persists, it might be time to pull the toilet up and have a look. If you pull up the toilet and can't ...


4

If the cold water supply to the water heater is frozen, there's not going to be much/any pressure to push water through. Typical mobile home freezup is the supply line to the mobile home, not as much the pipes inside the mobile home. The three feet or so between the floor and the ground is a prime area for freezing and usually requires insulation and heat ...


4

Sure, it's done all the time. Thickness of the wall will likely be determined by the required vent size. With two toilets, two tubs and four sinks, I think you'll likely have to go to a 2x6 wall if you go with a single vent stack, but you'd have to run the numbers. I did run into a code issue with drains T'ing into the main vertical stack at the same ...


3

With plumbing it is all about maintaining the proper drop per foot. The fact that this is a wash machine makes the call even easier. I guess the theoretical issue would be would the 90s and slowing of the water make it more likely that something could stick to the inside bend and accumulate enough that you would have an issue. My thoughts on this: don't ...


3

A nearly-full-clogged cold water pipe. Pressure builds in time after the clog (giving the initial full blast) but it cannot sustain the flow (dropping to a trickle).


3

I don't believe you're allowed to have two traps on the same drain line at all, and you certainly don't want two in a row. You will surely get weird syphoning and gurgling problems. Just replumb the new sink so that the drain goes straight down and joins the old sink's drain before the P trap.


3

The blue plastic piece itself can't be replaced. The whole inlet valve needs to be replaced. Pretty sure it's this part which costs about $50. Not very familiar with taking apart dishwashers down that far but the appliances I have taken apart have been surprisingly easy. I've always found videos online that helped. This video looks like your dishwasher. ...


3

There are several factors to consider here. 1) If the inside wall on the right side of the kitchen is a load bearing wall it could not be simply ripped out. It would likely have to be replaced with a beam to properly support the upper level. 2) If this first floor layout is built on a concrete slab then it is likely that some of the utilities are through ...


3

It's really hard to read your question, but I think you are essentially asking: "Is it okay to replace galvanized pipe and connect it with copper?" The answer is yes, but there are a couple things to keep in mind: Copper and galvanized pipe will suffer from galvanic corrosion where they meet unless they are isolated. This requires use of a dielectric union ...


3

These are just educated guesses since I cannot feel/smell these white deposits: My best guess is that your dip tube in your water heater disintegrated. This is a very common problem especially if your water heater is 10-25 years old. You simply need to replace dip tube and then go to all valves and faucets and clean them. Calcium deposits. I doubt this ...


3

Hardly any noticeable difference; though a "high flow" showerhead would make any difference WORSE, not better, as well as increasing your water use needlessly. The water is already traveling through many feet of pipe to get to the bathroom. Whether there's 4 more feet of pipe to the showerhead or 9 more feet of pipe to the showerhead makes very little ...


2

You don't remove it. The silicone is probably just to secure the pipe to the wall - so it doesn't wiggle or so that air doesn't get in. If you need access to the pipe I would cut the white pipe. This would allow you to fully snake anything below. Chances are pretty high that all of these pipes are glued very well together. They are not meant to wiggle ...


2

If these sinks are close enough to share a trap arm, then I see two options. Down and over Over and down You never want to put two traps in a row, and you never want to use an S-trap.


2

You likely need a backflow valve to meet code regulations these days. That said, I don't see any reason to have two of them. Whether it's at the hose bib, or at the well, it's doing the same thing for you. I suppose one argument for putting it closer to the well is that you block more of the water from back flowing, but if the pipe to the hose is rated for ...


2

First the only real concern you should have here other than the ability to use your sink is that the ice has made its way to the nearest PEX connector. What can happen is that the ice expands the PEX connector slightly and when it melts the connector is a little loose. It could fail right away or a year later. Not trying to put you in alarm mode but this ...


2

Sounds like a frozen pipe to me. If you can, you should turn the water off to that section of plumbing. At least until you can verify the plumbing has not been damaged.


2

It turns out that licensing for plumbers (and other contractors) in the city of Philadelphia is separate from whatever licensing concerns the rest of the state of Pennsylvania. I ended up calling the city's 311 information line and they were able to search their database of licenses for me (it turns out this guy is not licensed). The city does maintain an ...


2

Yeah, you're in a spot of trouble. There's likely a nut around the flange of the waste pipe that you need to turn as you hold the drain flange in place. If it's not possible to get behind the wall where the drain is, how about from below? Crawlspace / basement / first floor? Even if you could get the threads started, you'd likely end up with leaks if ...


2

Stock fitting - Male Pipe Thread to sweat (ie, soldered copper) Solder to a section of pipe, screw in, enjoy.


2

If you're not afraid of plumbing, move it. If you're not confident in your plumbing abilities, frame around it.


2

I would only call a plumber if the purpose was to have the plumber reroute the lines to an interior wall where the pipes will not freeze. I can't see paying someone $100 an hour plus for holding a hair dryer or mini-blow torch next to a pipe to get it to thaw. Your plumber plumbs not perform magic. If your pipes are freezing to this extent though I ...


2

There is no issue with connecting to the cold supply line near the water heater. However, there is a huge issue running plumbing through the attic. Attics are typically unconditioned spaces: they are not heated or cooled. In the winter, if you are in a cold climate, you have the possibility of freezing, and in summer, you will get very warm (or even hot) ...


1

I have never seen a P-trap with threads like you have here. If the metal is still as thin as any other P-trap out there, you may be able to drive something like a chisel down into the pipe length-wise, not to cut it but to crush the pipe down so it folds the threaded section down into the interior diameter of the P-trap, pretty much allowing the threads to ...


1

In the midwest in most towns the plumber and electricians would be licensed in each town. I would simply call town hall and ask them if this person is licensed there. Beyond that the easiest way to check the quality of work or liability is the inspection report. If the city didn't inspect the work than it wasn't licensed. If they did and signed off on it ...


1

Are plumbers even licensed in PA? There's a website to look up professional licenses (many states have similar sites): http://www.licensepa.state.pa.us but there's no category for "plumber". Being bonded and insured is another matter... mostly for liability, not legal permission. You could also check 3rd party websites like Angie's list or the Better ...


1

A contractor being licensed is one thing but likely does not give an immediate indication of work quality. But a whole lot more can come from references. Ask for references and then contact them to see what they thought of the contractor and quality of work performed. Do keep in mind that references are not going to be offered from previous clients that ...


1

Since you said "hard freeze", I'm guessing your from an area where it normally doesn't get below freezing. If this is the case, and the cold temperatures aren't going to last more than a day or two. You likely won't have any problems, since the heat from the home should keep the water above freezing (assuming the plumbing is in conditioned space, before ...


1

First thing, replace the flapper; it's cheap, easy to install and probably half if not all of your problem. Opening a faucet just triggers the fill-valve sooner than it would normally try to make up for the slow leak. Next, try tightening the the screw that holds the float at the correct fill level. I like to see at least a 1\4" before it will spill into ...



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