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6

You need a pex stub-out bracket that attaches to the studs: And a 90 pex support that attaches to the bracket: It would be nice to have a sleeve and a escutcheon: Your PEX will still be a little wobbly, but connecting it directly to the toilet valve is considered by many to a better solution than using a copper stub-out, because there is no fitting ...


5

What about if you used a screw-on hose bib anti-siphon adapter. You could screw/jam it on along with a generous amount of 2-part epoxy putty (like J.B. Weld) and have new garden hose threads... and anti-siphon protection as a bonus!


5

I cannot answer whether it needs replacing, but I can tell you why this happens. It happens because it gets cold and water condenses on it. Whenever you flush your toilet, cold water runs through and cools it off. Then the hot, humid air around it condenses water on it, making it moist. Because this happens so often, it will be moist a lot of the time, and ...


4

Just to add some visuals to the others' explanations using your photo, you need to (1) push on the collar trying to move it parallel to the tube, and (2) pull the tube. To reconnect, push the tube into the collar until it stops (should be about 1 inch). Make sure the tube end is square (perpendicular to the tube axis, with no damage); cut a bit of the tube ...


4

This is polypropylene, but the connectors are very similar to PEX quick-connect fittings. You need to push the protruding collar (the inner tube that the polypropylene is secured into) back inside the connector, and you have to apply the pressure to that collar evenly. You might be able to do that if you're gentle enough with a pair of pliers with the jaws ...


4

A - Expansion tank. This prevents the pressure increase due to heating water, from damaging the plumbing. The tank is filled with air, that is separated from the water by a bladder. When the water expands due to heating, water compresses the air absorbing the pressure. B - Check valve (or back flow valve). This is designed to only allow water to flow in ...


3

SharkBite® only officially supports 4 types of pipe, according to the FAQ Q: What types of pipe can SharkBite fittings be used with? A: SharkBite fittings are certified for use with: Copper pipe hard drawn Type K, L and M and annealed Type M not to exceed 3/8 nominal, complying with ASTM B88 PEX pipe complying with ASTM F 876 or CSA ...


3

Find a better store, if the ones you are going to don't have 2" PVC in full sticks (or possibly look higher up in the store you are in, and get someone to drag it down.) In MY house, the only place you'll find 1-1/2 or 1-1/4" is the tailpieces on the sinks - as soon as it hits pipe, it goes up to 2", because it's not that much more expensive and it greatly ...


3

I phoned Kohler to ask them this exact question. The answer, at least for Kohler, is that if the part number is exactly the same, the product is exactly the same. However, some parts, sold only at the Home Depot and Lowe's, have an "R" prefix on the part number. This stands for "retail" and can signify that cheaper parts have been used to reduce cost; for ...


3

This has been an ongoing problem in the bathroom sink we use the most. When I was using conventional solutions (Drano and the like) to unclog it, I just assumed that there was a bunch of hair in the drain. This was a problem every couple of weeks, though, and I hated spending so much money on toxic drain cleaners. A couple of years ago, I happened across a ...


3

You need the trap, for precisely the reason you guessed. Toilets have the trap built into the toilet itself. What you could do is get a strainer made to fit under the plug - often used in kitchen sinks. They are easy to find at most home stores or even dollar stores. That will stop any big stuff from going down the drain, and give you a chance to pull it ...


3

Most shower heads seal to the shower arm using a rubber washer. If that's the case with yours, the purpose of the threads is more to hold the washer tight, not provide a seal, and teflon tape or thread sealant compound are not useful.


3

If you go to apply for a permit for work you already did, you might get one of any number of reactions, ranging from, "just pay us our fee and go away" to "an inspector will be out next Thursday to make sure everything visible looks fine (and just pay us our fee)" to "you need to rip out all the finish materials so our inspector can look at the plumbing and ...


3

The white pipe at the top left appears to have a thermostatic mixer valve. That's the output side of the water heater. To avoid running out of hot water too quickly, the tank is set to a somewhat higher temperature than is actually desired, and this valve mixes that with cold water to get the actual temperature and sends that to the rest of the house. The ...


3

When copper oxidizes, it turns green. Usually there has to be some kind of catalyst to cause oxidation. Potential catalysts include salt, iron and any kind of acid. Acid will form in water due to dissolved carbon dioxide. Usually if copper is getting green, it is because it is getting wet. In the case of a boiler, this could be due to water in a humid ...


2

The best I can suggest is remove that old wood,it may attract insects as well,I used closed cell spray foam to seal my numerous entry holes,and the closed cell should help stabilize the pipe.If you have acess you could stabilize it with a bracket or hanger if its in the crawl space or basement.Good luck


2

You're not going to like the answer, but the way to properly fix this for good is to break up the concrete, cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. There are a variety of ways you could break this up. A sledge hammer, a hammer and chisel, a SDS drill with a chisel bit, or a larger chisel like a Brute. If you have a ton of time on your hands, you ...


2

Very odd, but here's a thought on how to troubleshoot. Shut off water pressure into your water heater. Test each one of your hot water taps. If any of them work, something is mixing cold water into your hot water pipes. Some one-handle faucet and shower fixtures can do this if their internal seals are worn out. Find it and fix it. If they all only work when ...


2

This is what I call a "push to connect" fitting. They are put together by pushing the tube into the fitting. They are released by pushing the small collar into the fitting and then pulling out the tube. Sometimes they are slightly stuck, and may take a little bit more force to pull out the tube, but it should be if if the plastic collar is first pushed into ...


2

I can't find anything in the IBC that prohibits exposed supply pipes in bathrooms. The only relevant sections I could locate were: 310.2 Location of fixtures and piping. Piping, fixtures or equipment shall not be located in such a manner as to interfere with the normal operation of windows, doors or other means of egress openings. ...and... ...


2

I do not know anything about american toilet systems, but in Europe the shutoff valve is usually located directly inside the flushing tank of concealed flushing systems. You get there usually by removing the cover of the flushing lever/button. For this purpose in most cases a snap-fit mechanism has to be overcome. I can imagine, that the valve was inside ...


2

I believe that your statement "the toilet is also supposed to apparently have a shut off valve" refers to rough plumbing and NOT the toilet. I am not aware of any toilet with a shut-off valve inside the toilet. If you don't have an external shut-off valve close to the external supply hose/pipe that connects to the toilet tank, you may not have a valve. In ...


1

It's not a problem. Pressure tank volumes add in series and this should do exactly what you want.


1

What you have may not work. The Douglas valve or flush valve (The brass looking piece in your toilet) extend through the toilet and the Ell goes into the valve and the whole thing setts with a nut. If the repair kits flush valve does not have enough to set, go through the tank, allow the ell to set and screw down with a nut, it is not going work. You may ...


1

You will need a P-Trap. If you look at the inside of a toilet, it won't have a P-Trap inside, but it is built in such a way that gas cannot vent into the air. It sounds to me like your issue is because of a small shower drain-line connected to your shower. To fix this, you should use a larger size pipe for your P-trap that won't get clogged. Please ...


1

In this case, it doesn't look like you need the vent loop at all, and the 6" height requirement is well-covered by the vent stack going clear up to the roof. If you want to put that loop in, it definitely isn't going to hurt anything. It just doesn't look like you need it. You could branch off the vent stack above the junction and use a flatter slope to ...


1

20 years old, it's almost certainly time for a new one unless it's of very unusual construction - like stainless steel. If water: overflows from the top of the pipe onto the floor Then the overflow pipe is not correctly routed - it should go DIRECTLY down to the floor. I can see it going sideways in the picture on your other question. It also appears ...


1

Probably not a good idea. Clothes washing machines generally discharge a large volume of water at a high rate, the drain apparatus is built with a standpipe (either inside the wall or outside where you can see it) to accommodate the volume. The standpipe holds the water long enough for it to drain without overflowing. Alternatively, a laundry tub/sink is ...


1

The kitchen faucet is a very common type and you just need a set screw of the proper diameter and length to replace the one that's gone missing. Take the handle to a home center's plumbing repair aisle, or to a plumbing supply house, and you should be able to get one. You may want to soak the lever in some vinegar first, to clear the calcification so it's ...


1

No other fixtures are "dependent" on the shower valve. What may be happening is what is called "crossover", hot water crossing over into the cold water line (or vise-versa) due to a defective single-handle mixing control. It sounds like your plumber may have been right, as this would tend to not have a noticeable effect when the shower is flowing. When the ...



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