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7

If you look at the picture below you will see pex tubing. This has become the industry norm in some areas of the US - I know some countries have adopted similar things and some haven't. The compression fittings are supposedly made to last longer than than a soldered copper joints - jury is still out on that. Let's see what complaints there are in 10-20 ...


5

No. You will need about 1 inch. It will hit the stop at about 1 inch and slightly (very slightly) pull out after it hits the stop. This is something that you don't want to mess with because if you don't have the correct length the bite action won't take. Good thing is unlike a bad solder job on copper you will notice that you didn't hit the stop right ...


4

Your external list is pretty good, what's missing is an internal list: water shut off valves(stem leaks) Connections between stop valves and mixing valve Stem leaks on mixing valve Shower arm and tub outlet extension: leaks at elbow inside wall It is unusual for these sources to end up on the floor, outside the tub, unless your bath is over a slab. ...


3

Those are simple "slip-joint" connections. Judging from the angle of the lower pipe assembly (the tee, and trap parts) it appears that you may have a loose connection downstream at the wall as well, or it would not have swiveled down and away like the picture shows. You can fix this yourself. Unscrew the nut at the top of the tee, there will be a plastic ...


3

Just resealing everything is a bad idea because you might, for example, just trap the leaking water somewhere you can't see it. The water will still leak and cause damage or mold. You really need to find out where the water is coming from. Turn on the shower and sit outside of it to find the leak.


2

That should be easy. Start by figuring out how much additional height you need. Use a pipe wrench to loosen the faceted collar at the top of the trap, and the standpipe should just pull up and out of that fitting. Take it to a store and tell them you need a piece the same size but however-much longer. You may have to get something a bit longer than that and ...


2

EPA discussion of waste treatment with lime One common sanitizer for sewage is lime. A farm supply would have it. You must layer the dirt and the lime, a 1:10 ratio (1 inch of lime to 10" of dirt) Care must be used against touching or breathing the lime directly. Hydrating and mixing each layer (or lift) will ensure the dispersal and neutralizing the ...


2

Iron or copper pipe? Corrosion inside metal pipes forms craters that eventually open a pinhole and as the metal erodes due to corrosion compromise and water flow, they get larger. From experience, if you have one pinhole, you have several incipient corrosion craters that will eventually leak elsewhere in the segment. You can patch them one at a time for ...


2

Typically if drain plumbing is not done right, it will drain perfectly fine... onto your floor. For it not to drain, means you have a blockage. Take the parts you fixed apart and do an inspection for any clogs. If they are free, assume the blockage is farther down the line. If that is the case, use a hand snake and snake out the drain before you put it ...


2

If you have sufficient ceiling height, you could consider laying a new floor over the existing floor. I'm assuming that since the bungalow needs refurbishing, then there is unlikely to be any (or at least sufficient) insulation under the existing slab, so you'd need to insulate under any new underfloor heating - no point having the sub-floor sucking half of ...


1

Plumbing code is generally unconcerned with the style of whatever fixture you choose to install, only that the fixture work properly and be installed properly.


1

Standard bathroom faucets come in versions that have the faucet handles on 4" centers, 8" centers, or separate pieces that can be placed at any distance apart. I have never heard of a jurisdiction whose building codes require a specific distance for handle centers. But to be certain, check with the local plumber who will be installing the fixture.


1

Sometimes centrifugal pumps (those with a spinning impeller) will cavitate when there is a discharge path too big to supply back pressure, and/or if there is not enough suction pressure. Cavitation will result in low or no flow, and will usually be accompanied by pump noise. You may be operating the pump outside of it's design parameters (pump curve). See ...


1

In 1987 we were still using acid flux, there was also no requirement to ream cut pipe ends. In addition, domestic (U.S.) production of copper had dropped precipitously and the demand was being met with foreign copper products with dubious quality control specs. All those things have contributed to frequent failure of copper water pipe and connections from ...


1

The water company charges you based on the amount of water that flows through the water meter. The water meter doesn't know which valves are open or closed, it only knows that water is flowing through it. Most places I've lived, bill based on cubic feet of water used (1 cubic foot of water = 7.48 gallons). There's also commonly a sewer charge if you're on ...


1

Your pressure drop issue is really a problem with flow capacity. You will not be changing or improving the flow capacity of your main house's plumbing system by tying in that 1/2" line from the guest house and will likely see zero improvement by doing so. You would be better off trying other things: Install low-flow water saving shower heads (this will help ...


1

I am sure that this can be fixed with a thread locker material. There are products available that can be placed onto threads before assembly and then will cure into a very tight joint to keep the threaded fasteners from coming loose. You can get this at almost any auto parts store. Ask them for "loctite" thread locker. Before trying to use it clean out ...


1

Your inspector should be able to grant a waiver for existing conditions if code compliance is a concern. If that is the case, I would wait and ask him/her for a solution that is acceptable. Hopefully something a bit shy of bumping the basement wall out 6", LOL. You could put the 1/2" foam behind, than cover the pipes with split foam pipe insulation. I try ...


1

Cut the foam into manageable pieces and slide into place. Use cans of spray foam insulation to fill the cracks in the sheets of foam caused by cutting. Or spray foam the entire cavity and forget the rigid foam.


1

Given multiple issues there, I think the correct and possibly simplest, albeit messy, solutiion is going to be cutting the floor open and putting the pipes where you need them. Concrete is not forever.


1

If the hot water is hooked up to your faucets, then hot water should eventually come out regardless of the re-circulation stuff. That is, unless the check valve is the wrong way or the pump isn't letting water flow. Then you would just get cold water. EDIT I see from your comment that the system was previously working and no work has been done. The check ...


1

I suspect the sound is from the drain pipes, and comes from a leaky toilet, beacause that's the most common thing that has a stored reservoir of water to keep leaking after you shut off the main valve. You might try leaving the main water valve shut off for several hours. If the sound eventually stops, go around and look in your toilets to see if any are ...


1

Despite being a different brand, the outgoing washer used the same inlet valve assembly. I was able to swap the parts, and the stripped inlet is going to the metal recycling center with the old washer.


1

I wouldn't bother unless you're going to have your water turned off for a couple days. In that case, turn off the water heater itself. You'll have a hard time using any hot water with the main turned off, so it is mainly a consideration of whether or not it's worth it to keep the water in the tank hot over the period you won't be using it.


1

I had the exact same problem under my bathroom sink. Here's a picture of how I resolved it. The first elbow off the sink is 1.5" because I couldn't find a 1.25" female-to-female elbow in my local Home Depot. I used a 1.25" sized compression washer in the larger elbow to get the smaller 1.25" elbow to fit snugly. Works great! You should be able to do the same ...


1

From personal experience my husband and I made the mistake of installing a new washing machine in our 2nd floor laundry room without properly placing a pan underneath the machine. We were thinking it was new so there was no chance of it leaking s at least not for a long time. Boy were we wrong! Three days later, a disaster filled the laundry room floor, out ...


1

You could just leave it alone... I got fined $1500, and had to dig it up and replace it... for cutting mine down below 42 inches.



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