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9

Most concrete and cement these days do not contain lime. When it contains lime its called Limecrete and generally it is used as a type of mortar for older buildings. Anyway If you wanted to protect the posts you are best soaking the post in creosote it's a type of oil that is used specifically to treat wood for this very reason its also used in tar ...


6

To answer your questions: "Why doesn't duct tape work for cables? Is it the fault of plasticizers? " - No -- it is more likely that exposure to air dries the glue, causing it to eventually lose its tack and become unstuck. This is also the reason that you're often left with sticky residue, as air was unable to penetrate to the underside of the glue. "Does ...


6

Plexiglas (poly (methyl methacrylate)) is strongly attacked by xylene, one of the solvents in the sealant you selected. I'd expect the sealant to soften the plexiglas and probably also whatever plastic the air conditioner is made of.


5

As a follow-up to the advice about using very fine saws and super fine sandpaper, jewelers rouge is often used to do a final polish on plastic to get to a clear finish.


5

I would recommend cutting the peg(s) using a fine toothed saw like this one: These saws cut very smooth and are made by Xacto. Should be available from most serious hardware stores and craft centers. One Source: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPM6183582501P?sid=IDx20110310x00001i&srccode=cii_184425893&cpncode=30-71592542-2 Many types ...


5

You could go with a hand drill for such small holes if you wanted. They work reasonably well and as long as your not too unco they are easy to use.


5

If what I am thinking your plastic wrap is, I think it is too thin and would probably be destroyed on installation. I covered the same area in roofing tar and they have been in for over 25 years. I came up about six inches above ground level. It's been through earthquakes and high winds and the posts have never been replaced. My next door neighbor did ...


4

While the lower end hotair guns often only have one or two settings, the more expensive models offer variable increments (I've seen units that do 50 degrees and a commenter mentioned 10 degrees; each model will be different so review the specs). The temperature spec gives the output temperature. Start low and increase the temperature as needed to melt the ...


4

When we cut vinyl siding, my tool of choice is a circular saw with the blade installed backwards. By putting the blade in backwards, it will wear down the plastic with a smooth line rather than shred it with a rough edge. The thicker and harder the plastic, the slower you have to go. If the circular saw doesn't work (perhaps because you can't make your cut ...


4

Maybe showerboard? I've used it in the past as a dry erase board. It comes in large sheets which you could attach to the wall via screws or hangers of some sort. A dab of white paint over the screw holes and you should be ok. I don't remember exactly how expensive it was but I don't think it was more than $20 per sheet ... and they were fairly large sheets. ...


4

You can get all these crappy aerosols that say shine this, shine that.. Finding the right one is very difficult. I used to buy this creamy liquid from a chemical supplier.. It was amazing! It restored the plastic to its natural, factory looking shine. This was in South Africa and years ago.. So i found this.. (it is not my shop.. its just the only guy who ...


4

One way is using a heated wire or needle (held with pliers) and melt through the plastic. This will not work for all plastics and the hole edges won't be very clean, but it is cheap and portable. You can use a lighter as a source of heat.


4

Gorilla glue makes a non-toxic PVC cement.


4

If the tool box is not actually designed to be mounted to the wall then there is a strong possibility that doing so may deform the box so that it does function in the way intended. This could be especially true if the box has a hinged lid. I think that your best bet would be to build a small shelf for under the tool box and secure that into the wall studs. ...


3

If you do decide to attach with screws you should use what are called fender washers between the head of the screw and the plastic. The fender washer has a larger diameter than a normal washer and is meant for situations where you need to spread the force of the screw over a larger area. This will make it less likely that your screw will crack the plastic or ...


3

For relatively small holes, you could use a push drill. One of the standards of this type was the "Yankee" brand from Stanley which has been discontinued. A number of other companies make this type at various price points. For example A smaller version for light work is also available.


3

It is proper to put a hose clamp on a connection like that as often the barbs aren't sufficient especially after it's come off a few times. If you're worried about damaging the fitting from the furnace just add another fitting after it and secure it the the furnace or floor, etc. Then your standalone fitting will be the one that gets damaged if somebody ...


3

This is a horrible idea IMO. Check out The Fence Bible from you local library. The cement does not rot your posts, the moisture does. Concrete holds moisture. If you don't allow the concrete to wick moisture out to its surrounding dirt, it will rot your posts quick. I think the best way to do posts is to use just gravel, no concrete. Tamp every 6 ...


3

Dremel tool would work, but is very undersized for the job. It wll get HOT if you try it. A Rotozip or similar small router could do the job. If you're not too concerned about the look of the edge, a jigsaw with a course blade would work given a pilot hole to start with. Plastic does tend to vibrate and seize on jigsaws, so expect a rough ride. Best choice ...


2

Based on your comment that you'll be storing heavy items, it's worth it to go with a more sturdy metal rack. If you're worried about carpet damage, dents are relatively simple to fix with steam, ice, or other methods. In the worst case, you'd probably prefer a few square inches of flattened carpet than your possessions broken.


2

Just doing some repairs on my (Canadian) house and it uses black foam glue (the tube said "acoustic foam") around the edges and nails with an L shaped right angle head along the studs


2

If Goof-Off isn't doing it, I'm thinking your best bet is to sand it and re-prime it.


2

Also have run into this issue when I used to manage a couple labs. Duct tape does not hold long to paint+plastic cabling. We Velcro tie cables at work now and use Velcro stick pads for walls and carpet if needed. Pretty cheap and you can move things and put them back when needed.


2

(since most people answered in the comments.) No, it won't.


2

I've used a similar process to restore hazed automotive headlights. 3M sells a kit that is used with a power drill and includes all the required materials. I've used this kit and was happy with the results. I'm not affiliated with 3M.


2

If the scratches are small, you can use toothpaste, which contains very fine abrasives, to polish them away. I have used this method for example on plastic eyewear (including my own prescription lenses) to good effect. It is cheap, small scale, and requires nothing in the way of special tools.This approach will also polish the edges of deep scratched making ...


2

Some sort of 2 part epoxy should hold up pretty well. Araldite is a common brand in the UK. For best results, try to remove the old glue so the bond is to the plastic itself, scuff both surfaces with sandpaper, then clean with something like alcohol to ensure the best bond. Allow to dry before applying epoxy. It's important to use the specified proportions ...


1

This question was answered before with a good solution shown at this posting: How can I repair a rusting dishwasher tray?


1

Find a nail or hole punch in the size you need and give it a good whack with a hammer!


1

If this poster has potential value either sentimental or monetary I would reccomend framing it like you would a photograph. Based on the size I would use lexan /plexiglass to cover it. The problem with using glue is the wood will expand and contract with humidity changes, the poster will stay the same size. This will result in buckles when the wood shrinks ...



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