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8

Most concrete and cement these days do not contain lime. When it contains lime its called Limecrete and generally it is used as a type of mortar for older buildings. Anyway If you wanted to protect the posts you are best soaking the post in creosote it's a type of oil that is used specifically to treat wood for this very reason its also used in tar ...


6

To answer your questions: "Why doesn't duct tape work for cables? Is it the fault of plasticizers? " - No -- it is more likely that exposure to air dries the glue, causing it to eventually lose its tack and become unstuck. This is also the reason that you're often left with sticky residue, as air was unable to penetrate to the underside of the glue. "Does ...


5

As a follow-up to the advice about using very fine saws and super fine sandpaper, jewelers rouge is often used to do a final polish on plastic to get to a clear finish.


5

I would recommend cutting the peg(s) using a fine toothed saw like this one: These saws cut very smooth and are made by Xacto. Should be available from most serious hardware stores and craft centers. One Source: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPM6183582501P?sid=IDx20110310x00001i&srccode=cii_184425893&cpncode=30-71592542-2 Many types ...


5

If what I am thinking your plastic wrap is, I think it is too thin and would probably be destroyed on installation. I covered the same area in roofing tar and they have been in for over 25 years. I came up about six inches above ground level. It's been through earthquakes and high winds and the posts have never been replaced. My next door neighbor did ...


4

While the lower end hotair guns often only have one or two settings, the more expensive models offer variable increments (I've seen units that do 50 degrees and a commenter mentioned 10 degrees; each model will be different so review the specs). The temperature spec gives the output temperature. Start low and increase the temperature as needed to melt the ...


4

Maybe showerboard? I've used it in the past as a dry erase board. It comes in large sheets which you could attach to the wall via screws or hangers of some sort. A dab of white paint over the screw holes and you should be ok. I don't remember exactly how expensive it was but I don't think it was more than $20 per sheet ... and they were fairly large sheets. ...


4

You can get all these crappy aerosols that say shine this, shine that.. Finding the right one is very difficult. I used to buy this creamy liquid from a chemical supplier.. It was amazing! It restored the plastic to its natural, factory looking shine. This was in South Africa and years ago.. So i found this.. (it is not my shop.. its just the only guy who ...


4

When we cut vinyl siding, my tool of choice is a circular saw with the blade installed backwards. By putting the blade in backwards, it will wear down the plastic with a smooth line rather than shred it with a rough edge. The thicker and harder the plastic, the slower you have to go. If the circular saw doesn't work (perhaps because you can't make your cut ...


4

If the tool box is not actually designed to be mounted to the wall then there is a strong possibility that doing so may deform the box so that it does function in the way intended. This could be especially true if the box has a hinged lid. I think that your best bet would be to build a small shelf for under the tool box and secure that into the wall studs. ...


4

Gorilla glue makes a non-toxic PVC glue.


3

It is proper to put a hose clamp on a connection like that as often the barbs aren't sufficient especially after it's come off a few times. If you're worried about damaging the fitting from the furnace just add another fitting after it and secure it the the furnace or floor, etc. Then your standalone fitting will be the one that gets damaged if somebody ...


3

If you do decide to attach with screws you should use what are called fender washers between the head of the screw and the plastic. The fender washer has a larger diameter than a normal washer and is meant for situations where you need to spread the force of the screw over a larger area. This will make it less likely that your screw will crack the plastic or ...


3

For relatively small holes, you could use a push drill. One of the standards of this type was the "Yankee" brand from Stanley which has been discontinued. A number of other companies make this type at various price points. For example A smaller version for light work is also available.


3

This is a horrible idea IMO. Check out The Fence Bible from you local library. The cement does not rot your posts, the moisture does. Concrete holds moisture. If you don't allow the concrete to wick moisture out to its surrounding dirt, it will rot your posts quick. I think the best way to do posts is to use just gravel, no concrete. Tamp every 6 ...


3

Dremel tool would work, but is very undersized for the job. It wll get HOT if you try it. A Rotozip or similar small router could do the job. If you're not too concerned about the look of the edge, a jigsaw with a course blade would work given a pilot hole to start with. Plastic does tend to vibrate and seize on jigsaws, so expect a rough ride. Best choice ...


2

Based on your comment that you'll be storing heavy items, it's worth it to go with a more sturdy metal rack. If you're worried about carpet damage, dents are relatively simple to fix with steam, ice, or other methods. In the worst case, you'd probably prefer a few square inches of flattened carpet than your possessions broken.


2

If the scratches are small, you can use toothpaste, which contains very fine abrasives, to polish them away. I have used this method for example on plastic eyewear (including my own prescription lenses) to good effect. It is cheap, small scale, and requires nothing in the way of special tools.This approach will also polish the edges of deep scratched making ...


2

I've used a similar process to restore hazed automotive headlights. 3M sells a kit that is used with a power drill and includes all the required materials. I've used this kit and was happy with the results. I'm not affiliated with 3M.


2

Some sort of 2 part epoxy should hold up pretty well. Araldite is a common brand in the UK. For best results, try to remove the old glue so the bond is to the plastic itself, scuff both surfaces with sandpaper, then clean with something like alcohol to ensure the best bond. Allow to dry before applying epoxy. It's important to use the specified proportions ...


1

I have a similar torch/Flashlight and have had the exact same problem.. I fixed mine with a product called Q-Bond. On my flashlight, the magnet was flush (ie not resessed) and I was able to build up a sidewall to add extra strength. Needless to say... the magnet has not come off (and yes, this is from years of camping in the heat/cold/rain etc.)


1

You can use a soldering iron with a small pointed tip to heat the perimeter of the recessed area the magnet sets in. After it heats up, put the magnet in place, and the tip of the iron about 1/4" away. Then push the iron down and towards the magnet until the plastic melts and some of it overlaps the magnet, or, wedges it in place. Do this 3 or four times ...


1

Buffing followed by acid etch (to restore texture). Overall a pretty rough job. You'll want to check the plastic type (found next to a 'recycling' symbol usually) for additional guidance. LDPE is common. Some people use heat guns, but for maximum potential entertainment value why not try a blowtorch? LDPE is actually pretty hard to set on fire.


1

Gaffer tape doesn't leave the horrible residue of duct tape and may be strong enough to hold cables to a wall. In my experience, in every application longer than a few days, duct tape either leaves a sticky residue or a crumbly, dried-adhesive residue, both of which are quite difficult to remove. Because I've seen this on many surfaces, I conclude that the ...


1

1/2 inch is pretty thick material to work with. A saw is the right tool for this job. You can use a table saw, circular hand saw, jig saw, or band saw to cut Lexan. This Processing Guide (PDF) has details on the sorts of blades you should use. It does say that you can mill Lexan with at bit more like the Dremel Router bits they recommend 25,000 - 30,000 ...


1

Polycarbonate likes to melt when you hit it with a high speed blade. The teeth on your 1/8" spiral cutting bit will quickly goo up, and you'll find yourself melting rather than sawing. With some skill/practice, you'll probably be able to make your plastic into about the shape you want. Biggest trouble will probably come from you making the cut too quickly, ...


1

If this poster has potential value either sentimental or monetary I would reccomend framing it like you would a photograph. Based on the size I would use lexan /plexiglass to cover it. The problem with using glue is the wood will expand and contract with humidity changes, the poster will stay the same size. This will result in buckles when the wood shrinks ...


1

In the strictest sense, if it has a metallic finish, it is metal, though it may only be a few molecules thick over a plastic substrate. But you refer to the base material. It can be hard to tell when it's in place due to the resistance of the mechanism masking the apparent mass. The way to distinguish without destructive sampling is essentially it's mass. ...


1

If you are working with acrylic you should check these technical bulletins for information about how to work with arcylic. I have successfully used a tablesaw to get a good straight cut then used a variable speed bench jointer to smooth the edge. I was working with 1/4" and 1/8" thick acrylic and resulting parts were all rectangular and more than 1" in ...


1

Depending on the type of plastic, and the thickness / dimensions of the cut, a hot knife or a heated wire knife might be what you are looking for. There are many ways to go about rigging a hot knife, the simplest being to attach an xacto knife blade to a soldering iron. Larger jobs might require a purpose built tool, or at least a much better setup. ...



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