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1

Scribe it. Use a compass (or a stick with a pencil attached to it) set to the widest gap - run the compass or stick-with-pencil along the wall, marking the countertop a set distance out from the wall. Cut along the line - if done carefully, the wavy edge of the countertop should now fit the wavy wall precisely.


0

I've successfully patched plaster walls with drywall. It's a pain, but it can be done. Chip away the plaster to expose half a stud on either side of the hole. Cut your drywall patch for the hole. Check the depth. Usually the plaster coat will be thicker than the drywall by a good amount. You want the drywall to sit inside the plaster by about 1/8" of an ...


3

Freestanding steel studs are fine (assuming they are anchored to a sill and top plate). Steel studs anchored to the furring strips are fine. Why wouldn't steel studs anchored to the furring strips, plaster and lath be fine? The only limitation would be if the lath and plaster had significant bowing or hollowing in spots that the new studs came in contact ...


0

I'd use a combination of wood and wire lathe, bringing the new wire lathe out flush with the old wire lathe. Wire brush out all of the loose pieces, then fill it in with a green coat of STRUCTO-LITE plaster, followed by a coat of Durabond setting type 90, then finish off with a coat or two of Light Weight setting type 90. "WET" the joint with a spray ...


2

Since it's too small to fit a piece of drywall, I would fill the gap with setting-type joint compound embedded with fiberglass mesh. It may take two or three coats to fill the gap. After it's filled, finish the two sides like you would if it were filled with a piece of drywall: Tape the patch with paper and feather out to the plaster. Then put on a ...



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