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In my years in the construction trade, here is my synopsis of concrete floats and trowels and their uses. I will start with the screed. A screed can be as simple as a short piece of framing, 1X3 or 2X4, long enough to go from side to side of a concrete form, whether it be for a 12" thick foundation or a 3' wide side walk. For larger poured slabs the screed ...


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A good way to determine the seriousness is to call an engineer, as you have done. Because soils can settle, water can degrade materials, concrete and other materials can expand and contract over time, storms exert wind forces, and seismic events occur, design and/or construction issues may express themselves in the structural system at any time. So may ...


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Mortared bricks settle much more extensively than plaster. Have a look at Chicago's 15 story masonry Monadnock Building, still settling since 1891 more than 20 inches. The building was designed to settle 8 inches (200 mm), but by 1905 had settled that much and "several inches more", necessitating reconstruction of the first floor.By 1948, it had settled ...


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Anytime you have to open a wall in an older home, you are opening a can of worms. You would probably save money in the long run by getting a licensed, insured contractor on the job. Once you open the walls, you will probably need to upgrade the plumbing, electrical, and insulation to modern standards. Also, check the thickness of the walls. A friend of ...


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Assuming the plasterboard is still sound, you should be able to re-skim the board with finish plaster to restore the surface to level with the breast wall (or get a plasterer in to do it if that's not where your DIY skills lie).


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You may not have lathe, but compressed board under the plaster and scratch coat. Either way; if plaster is any way compromised you should tear out to studs and start over. Bring plumbing to code; add a diverter and shower line in the wall; cover with cement board, tape off. Follow manufacturer instructions to a tee. Or, flatten walls with a latex modified ...


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Use scrim tape on both 90 degree and non-90 degree internal corners. I've never had a problem with it in internal corners, though I don't do much plastering. You can use skim beads on non-90 degree external corners; it might help to squash them out to open further and better fit the profile of the corner. Don't forget to scrim tape the straight board ...


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I can't tell you how much I would be reamed if I plastered a brick wall, then painted it then put tiles on with adhesive for a shower. First that wouldn't pass any inspections in the US. I am not going to go on about how your shower should have been done or waterproofing because that is a different question. Your answer is that you would deal with bowed ...


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Just in case this helps anyone, I spoke to the people at the tile shop and they recommended building the wall out using cement based tile adhesive (the type you buy as powder and mix). I did this and it worked well. You have to work fast though, that stuff dries very quickly!


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I see no benefit to cutting a section out of the wall before patching it up. You don't say how old your house is, but in the houses I've lived in that are nearing 100 years or so, the plaster can weaken to the point you can pull it apart with your fingers if you damage the surface somewhere. If that is indeed a coat of plaster/insulation on top of the ...



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