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Yes you can. First make sure you have a rough surface. Then apply several coats of stain killer. Make sure it's alcohol base. This means it has shellac in it which is an excellent sealer. I prefer zinzer it's not as sloppy as kilz. Then get some easysand drywall patch, mix it up and apply with wide knife. This is one way. I'm sure you will hear more.


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All guess work: That wall is an edition. If it was original to the house as a stiffener, it would be sitting directly on the lath. The little 'blue' pieces raise the 2x4 above the plaster lobes. If scraped completely flat, the ceiling below would have got all messed up. Even then, it's likely to pop the plaster off the lath, with what little is left ...


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If there is a wall directly below it is most likely the "top plate" that the walls studs are nailed to. If there are no studs attached it then is most likely a "stiffener" for the wood lath underneath it. In this case it would be keeping the lath strips in-line and level in order to prevent bouncing or flex. It has been installed there with a purpose unless ...


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What I ended up doing was putting up batons on the ceiling and plasterboard over the top. We did this with the other wall which was questionable too. Benefits here are that the finish is much better once finished, and it's decidedly less plastering than doing the entire wall. The cost was likely higher than if we had plastered, but the end result was much ...


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Concrete dust becomes air-bourn when it is pulverized (due to tool use: drilling, sawing, hammering, etc.). The fine silt concrete dust is thrown into the surrounding air by electric tool motor fans or other air currents. The particulate is so small and light-weight any slight breeze will distribute it until it finally sinks and lands on a surface. Where, ...



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