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13

Yes. And in many districts, it is a requirement to have an architect design while an engineer examines and seals the plans.


11

I personally use Google SketchUp to model both the interior and exterior of our house. It may not have the depth of features you're looking for but if you're going for open source freeware that's pretty usable out of the gate you can't go wrong. As a side note, I have seen some people use Blender to do modeling, though more for in-home manufacturing.


11

I'll go ahead and answer because I think your core question is a good one. It sounds like what your company installs are fairly complex home automation systems, and you're hiring residential electricians to do the wiring. Instead, what you need for applications like this is an electrician with industrial automation experience. They do exactly the type of ...


10

Although David Moore is somewhat correct, there are a lot of varied explanations to your question depending on where you live, the market etc. In large markets, there are large corporate home builders that have multiple crews covering all trades and do a turn key package. Many do custom homes from your plans. Many however will only build your home on land ...


9

I don't agree with: Architect will want a house to be fancy or make a statement about society Ask around for recommendations. A good architect is like a graphic designer -- they're paid to make you happy by turning your vision into a reality. Yes, there are quite a few out there who deal in the ultra-fancy, but there's quite a few out there who like ...


8

Thats great that you are looking to do a lot yourself. We did the same. So I drew up the initial plans, which totally spelled out what we wanted, overall size, rooms, etc. But my drawings were no where near that what was needed for the permits, for building drawings (any subs that you may use), and for materials when you take them to the lumber yard. I ...


6

On the second level, is the stair closer to the bigger bedroom or the smaller bedroom? How can you tell from the drawing? As you're going up the stairs, you're facing the 10x12 bedroom. The hatching on the left end of the stairs on the lower-level indicates that it's not really part of that level. It also wouldn't make sense for you to have to go ...


5

Some of those minimum clearances are defined in building codes and will vary from place to place. In Ohio we use the International Plumbing Code (IPC) and it does define some of these minimums and local municipalities might add additional regulations. But it sounds like you may not be as concerned with the minimum specifications, what you really want to ...


5

Toilets The standard side clearance for a toilet is 15" as measured from the centre of the floor flange to the side wall and or cabinet. This measurement is increased to 18" for ADA compliance. I wouldn't go much more then that as you will start to feel like the toilet is floating in the room. The standard distance from the back wall to the centre of the ...


5

The numbers on each side of your plan are probably measurements in millimeters. That's the closest relation I could find to the handwritten 1098 square feet. 7 541 mm * 13 300 mm = 7,541 m * 13,3 m = 100,295 square meters = 1 079.5 square feet


5

You are going to get lots of opinions on this but in general I would say people with experience building homes - maybe 30% (I think I am being overly optimistic) could do a custom right with no major problems. General contractors - ha. You are looking at 5% if that. You need someone with experience with custom homes. You need an architect to OK it. Not ...


5

The verbiage of the laws is very important. After some research, I think I've found what you're referring to. Outbuildings are considered to be permitted development, not needing planning permission, subject to the following limits and conditions: Outbuildings and garages to be single storey with maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum ...


4

Residential Architects aren't making a statement about society. They are making a statement about you, the client. Just my personal opinion, but if I'm putting the time, money and effort into building my own house, I want it to be a house designed for me. An architect will help me design that house.


4

SketchUp Pro allows direct export to DXF. Sketchup (free) allows you to export DAE, which can be converted via FBX to DXF. See, e.g.: http://www.cadforum.cz/cadforum_en/qaID.asp?tip=6416


4

The perfect tool is sitting right there on your tool shelf - your hand plane. Hold it upside down in your nondominant hand and slide the pencil across the blade with your dominant hand. Be careful!


4

Here would be my basic approach (Mechanical Engineer here, Statics TA for 4 semesters): For starters, you could figure out the weight of the mattress and box spring plus the weight of two people lying on it (W). Add in a safety factor (at a minimum 2, ideally a bit more) - remember, an uneven or dynamic loading will apply significantly higher stresses to ...


4

You'll need to check your local codes. In the US, most building code sections begin with a list of definitions, and I assume it's the same elsewhere. If the difference between a shed and a garage is legally significant then they probably define it. It could be based on size, intended use, access to utilities, proximity to other buildings, access to a ...


3

At least in the USA both architects and structural engineers will do this type of work. Not all architects will want this small of a job (but you may be surprised how many will) and not all structural engineers will want to draw up plans. Basically you are on the right track; I would just call around to the architects and structural engineers in your area ...


3

I can't speak as to how to calculate it, but from experience, 2x4s are overkill. For the beds I've seen, 1x3s slats (laid down, not vertical), with a vertical 1x4 perimeter, were sufficient unless both people weigh 300+lbs. You will want a center rail and possibly a center leg (some mattress warranties actually require one!). Reducing the span length is a ...


3

putting the legs on the inside will induce a shearing load on the connection. A better connection would be having the wood frame rest on the leg (with a notch). You also need to account for the needed strength in the corners so everything stays square. or you can do a google search on bed plans and get a tried and tested design the first link even only ...


3

In addition to amperage, you should decide what voltage you want to be able to use, and if 220, which type of outlet you're likely to need. A 220v welder will take about half the amperage of a similar 110v welder. 90-100 amps is fairly common, but you can find smaller (and larger) welders. An air compressor will probably take a lot less current, maybe ...


3

I used plans purchased from The Garden Coop. They're not that expensive and included a complete parts list to get started. The egg doors are part of the plan, but the removable tray is not. I'm an amateur at this, and yet I found the plans well-explained and simple enough to make some modifications along the way without much trouble.


3

Back Yard Chickens has lots of different designs, with instructions on how to build them. While you're there, you can even get some recipes for cooking your chickens (if you ever get tired of taking care of them, or get really hard up for cash).


2

I helped my friend design his house. He bought several design books with basic plans for houses. We combined a couple of the plans to sketch out a basic floor plan and dimensions for what he wanted. He took that basic plan to the lumber yard. They had an architect they worked with who turned it into official blueprints. I don't know how much it cost, ...


2

You can use either a designer or an architect, but depending on where you are building and the complexity of the home, you may need an engineer to stamp the plans. For more detailed info in deciding which is a better fit for you, I'd go to http://OwnerBuilderBook.com. The forums there were invaluable when I owner-built my own home.


2

Here are a few free ones I found through a Google search. Build a Single Garage Shell. Plan for a 16' X 22' Garage. 20' X 24' Garage. There seems to be a lot of sites that will supply you with plans for a fee. You may also be able to find blueprints of garages built in your city at the city clerks office, at least for garages built with permits (I think ...


2

In order of increasing cost: This website has a few good plans for simple garages available at no cost. TodaysPlans looks like it has some good plans for free, but you have to get them through email. Mybackyardplans has a few for free, but they look to be low quality. This website has them starting around $70. JustGaragePlans has a wide range to pick ...


2

I'm sure this question is moot for the original writer but for anyone else with a similar interest, the important point is that the garage is going to be used as a shop and the electrical infrastructure should be flexible to accomodate future needs. Thus I would recommend you install a 100 AMP sub-panel (220V of course) and surface mount it so that you can ...


2

A quick check on Amazon shows that many welders are 115V / 20A devices, which is not much. If that's all you want, then any size subpanel you put in the garage will be enough. 60A is a common subpanel size. When I went to run a 30A subpanel to my septic system, I found that the smallest allowable copper wire was twice as expensive as some enormous (#2) ...



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