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3

Those are simple "slip-joint" connections. Judging from the angle of the lower pipe assembly (the tee, and trap parts) it appears that you may have a loose connection downstream at the wall as well, or it would not have swiveled down and away like the picture shows. You can fix this yourself. Unscrew the nut at the top of the tee, there will be a plastic ...


1

Why don't you use a standard sized and threaded pipe for your shelves? Sizes range from 1" to 8'(foot) in lengths and 1/2" to 3" in half inch increments on the widths, in stock and on the shelves at Home D or just about any DIY Big Box Store. This way you could create whatever you like and probably wind up within an inch or so of wherever you want it to ...


0

Added 2 eyelets per corner and used rope to tighten the tension. Not quite an A-frame like the other answer, but it's now very stable. I also noticed the instability was due to the wooden planks not being completely flat, so I padded the gap with magazines and doorstoppers, and now it doesn't budge at all. Thanks for all the suggestions!


4

If you buy the pipe at Home Depot, they custom cut it (and thread it) for free. You have to buy the pipe, and there is a fairly flexible policy that they will make up to three cuts per 10 foot length, but if you catch them an hour before closing or when it is not otherwise busy, they are very accommodating.


3

The ease of cutting will come down to the following: The pipe schedule (thickness of the pipe wall) The diameter of the pipe The cutting tool to be used Assuming that the pipe schedule is sch 40 or less and the diameter is 2" or less (larger diameters can limit the cutting tool selection and the increases the effort required to obtain a true parallel ...


0

Add a A - frame for support. Would be heaps stronger.


0

Attach the bar to the wall. Trying to leverage from the floor will require several times the lateral forces applied at the top. By attaching it at the top, the forces will be one to one. If direct attachment is not feasible, then bars which brace against opposing walls would prevent the need to drill into any wall.


3

It will probably be 3 to 6 hours of non-skilled labor (neighborhood kids?) to dig up the concrete and remove the whole assembly. Don't cut the post off: it will help wiggle out the base. Dig a hole immediately to one side of the concrete base of a convenient size. (There is no need to dig all around it.) A post hole digger works great. Make the hole at ...


0

That pipe is most likely cast so your bi-metal blades aren't going to cut it (forgive the pun). You need one of the Lenox Gold recip blades. There's few varieties but any of the Gold line should cut that pipe, or there's some specifically designed for cast although I believe those are more expensive. I've cut hardened steel concrete anchors with the diamond ...


0

You need a sawzall blade with a diamond grit rather than teeth. That way, it abrades the metal rather than really cutting it--same approach that angle grinders take. It'll be cheaper to buy a top-of-the-line abrasive blade than an angle grinder, so I would do that, especially seeing how you already have a nice sawzall (I have the same one and love it). I ...


2

The first thing is to check is that you are using the correct blade type. The one in you picture looks like it might be a wood blade, but I can't be certain. There are various qualities of metal blades, so considering the thickness, you might opt for a higher quality (more expensive) blade. Don't be surprised if you go through a few blades on this. ...



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