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1

I'm assuming you're talking about not using proper plastic electrical conduit. If you want the capability of adding wires later, it sounds like the only solution with that many turns. Be sure to use the longest sweeps you can - normal vent 90's will not work. Many manufacturers make extra long sweeps for regular pvc that is not in the home center - ...


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I would try to include a couple of PVC cleanouts at a couple of the interior bends, ideally evenly spaced (eg. bend - cleanout - bend - bend - cleanout - bend). This way you could start a cable and pull it through the cleanout before feeding it back in and pulling to the next cleanout. This means each pull only has to traverse one or two bends at a time, ...


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While you're building the run, you can put a chase string in place, and use it to pull cables. You'll want a chase string to be 2x the total length of the run, and tie it off to each end of the run by tying it to an eye hook or a screw. Then it won't (generally) matter how convoluted the run is, you'll always have the chase string to guide wires from one ...


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It is possible this was originally used for a wood fired water heater? Perhaps This would have been the precursor to the wood/pellet stoves currently in use in some parts of the country. Maybe someone wanted a fancy outhouse (or other out building) with hot water. Very odd scenario!! What to do now? It depends on how much time and money you want to ...


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Original owners planned on an outdoor cooking area on the deck. Hot water to an outside sink. A natural gas line next to it for a grill.


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To rephrase: Is there a way to make two pipes join together in an removable way that would be no more than 10mm thick with nothing inside or outside the extended planes of the existing pipes in a way that is water tight? No. BTW- the image in the link provided is for a key lock for desk drawers and the like.


3

As stated in comment, it's really very unlikely that the steam supply is high pressure steam (per the standard nomenclature of the industry) for a multitude of reasons - too hot, requiring a dedicated, licensed boiler operator, and the commissioning and annual inspections would have failed the copper pipes before it was ever fired up. Also, someone would ...


3

There is probably a gasket under that hold down flange. Buy a replacement gasket. Then remove the flange, use sand paper to remove any corrosion until you have a smooth, bright metal surface, then install the new gasket, and screw the flange back in.


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There are two practical ways to deal with this. Before getting into details let me say that you should stop trying to join the trap parts of metal pipe to the trap parts of plastic pipe. Method 1. Remove the metal pipe with the J bend and complete the P trap with plastic parts. Then join the plastic pipe to the down flow drain system where the pipes are ...


2

Carefully dig it out (a garden hose may be useful for "hydro-excavating" right next to the pipe, otherwise some careful trowel and shovel work) and figure out where it does run, then you can decide what to do about it. Beware of possible other poorly buried items while you are digging (wires, etc.) Assuming you have to work with where it comes out of the ...


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Short answer is, because the 1/2" flexible tubing is short enough to not cause a major pressure loss. If you ran 1/2" line the whole way, it would be too much pressure drop. Pressure drop across a pipeline is a function of all the friction losses added together. These include "major" losses (the official terminology, not mine) from the friction with the ...



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