New answers tagged

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Galvanized pipe can last a long time, without "failing". However, while the pipe might look great on the outside, the inside is likely restricted by corrosion and deposits. All galvanized pipe I've ever removed, looks something like this on the inside. My advice to anybody that still has galvanized pipe in their homes, is to replace it as soon as ...


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Galvanic corrosion occurs when galvanized steel is in direct contact with copper and creates pin holes in the copper from the inside out. Copper does not degrade the steel pipe. What does happen inside the steel pipes is rust/mineral deposits form on the interior walls much like arterial buildup in a human being restricting your water flow. Because the ...


3

40-50 years is a fair lifespan. I've seen plenty of houses with galvi that was 60+ years old without it failing, the real issue to me is if you want to wait until it fails to replace it. Not greatly accelerated the process, no. Yes. Potentially and at decent expense. It depends on the size of the water service, condition of the piping, and access point. ...


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It could be a DIY project, PVC is easy to work with. Only thing you really need to watch out for is to make sure the new piping you install is CPVC. Neither Schedule 40 nor Schedule 80 PVC (the other most common kinds) are not legal for install inside the house in most jurisdictions. CPVC is also the only kind of PVC rated for hot water. That said, ...


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Yeah, a handy DIY person could do the re-routing of those hot and cold water line connections. You would have to deal with shutting off the water supply, cutting out all the old stuff and then re-plumbing in with new piping and fittings. Hopefully you get all the parts that you would need in one initial trip to the big box store. Do be aware as you get ready ...


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I just cut down a 4" steel basketball pole at my daughters house. I used my 4" side grinder. If it takes you over 15 minutes I would be surprised. Any brand of grinder would be fine. Odds are that is carbon steel, not cast iron. Good luck. Try this method first.


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April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


3

Being that you are repairing an unpressurized drain, the squareness of the pipe end is not nearly as critical as a pressurized supply line. Just make sure to clean and prime the pipe prior to applying solvent cement. Additionally, if you have a level handy, lay it across the drain once the fitting is in place to to ensure proper placement. Side note: It ...


5

There is a tool that is made for cutting out the PVC pipe in a joint so that it may be used again. That tool may be useful to square up the end of the pipe in this case if you were able to hold the tool inline with the pipe while it shaves off the high part of the pipe. This is what one example of the tool looks like. These are used to chucking up the ...


0

install a pvc union before the ball valve and use pipe dope (Teflon sealant) instead of the Teflon tape. http://www.homedepot.com/p/RectorSeal-T-Plus-2-4-oz-Teflon-Pipe-Thread-Sealant-23631/100201204


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Municipal water meters are positive displacement meters as they are the most accurate at low and high flow rates. If the supply is shut off for a prolonged period of time (several hours) it is likely that water in the pipes will be drained by consumers trying to get as much water from the supply as they can. The result is air filled pipes. When the supply is ...


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For the short term, go buy, borrow or steal a shop-vac before the pipes burst. And stop trying to burn your house down with a hair dryer. Until you fix this long term, always leave the cold water tap on the faucet running just a tiny bit during the winter.


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Please be aware Bleach does not kill mold. https://www.normi.org/articles/bleach-mold.php Moreover, pictures would greatly improve our chances to help you. Things I would suggest you to look for is condensation in the ducts. This can occur when there is a leak of cold air in the duct work. This creates a heat exchange between the hot air outside in the ...


3

First of all, do you in fact have PVC pipes? Lots of older houses have cast iron end-to-end, so nothing at all to worry about in that case. Even if you do have PVC, I don't think there's any serious concern, with the very slight possibility of an effect the drain trap (if any) right under the sink. While continuous immersion in 100° C water might soften ...


2

PVC gets soft when heated. As Tester101 commented above, 140°F is the maximum temperature for pvc. Boiling water is 212° F. I have bent many PVC pipes with pipe heaters for running cable (schedule 80 takes about 2-3 minutes to get soft in a pipe heater). They don't bust, but they certainly can and will bend, which is obviosly not ideal for joints or ...


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You can put the porcelain throne on a pedestal to raise it enough. It's cheating a bit and may cause a few stubbed toes until you adjust to it.


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if the compression nut is tight, then you should not have a leak. dont put teflon on a compression joint face. you can, if desperate pull it apart and coat everything with a good layer of pipe dope and then reassemble. sometimes you may have a little corroded pore that this can fix. might be time to replace the supply line, nut and ferrule. other ...


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If you already paid the plumber there may not be much on that front as the cost of that job was probably less that the cost of taking a dispute to small claims court. If you have not made payment yet then you have the option to withhold till they come back and make it right or fire then off the job. In either case you are most likely facing having to knock ...


2

This looks all wrong. It looks like you have installed an adjustable P-trap upside down. The upside down "U" shaped piece attached to the pipe coming from the cabinet floor is supposed to be under the sink strainer. You need a proper tailpiece to attach to the strainer, which will come down into the "tall" end of the "U" shaped piece. The piece you now have ...


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just cut horizontally across the pipe that projects up from the cabinet base. cut it off about 3" up from the base, and then again about 2" up from the base. you have essentially removed a 1" section of pipe. then install a 1-1/4" fernco flexible coupling over the stub (up from the cabinet) and the remainder of the trap side stub. tighten the two gear ...


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you have sort of answered your own question - let me elaborate 1) the valve body should be secured somehow to avoid fore and aft movement. the movement flexes pipes and joints that arent meant to be flexed, and it is this movment that keeps unscrewing the trim face screws. you can simply cut a hole on the rear wall the valve is within, and place a ...



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