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Thanks DarthCaniac for the detailed answer!! However I didn't see your answer before because I needed to get this fixed right away, so I started on my own and yes that is exactly how I started, when I unscrewed the top tailpiece nut it did come out, however the bottom nut was like sealed maybe because it's been there for years, so I ended up break in half ...


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If you notice at the top, there is a handy dandy nut (if you will) that you can unscrew. Take that off, and you're half way to removing it. After that, you can unscrew the bottom of the p trap from the rest of the pipe. Next you will need a PVC P trap kit. Make sure you bring your old pipe to the hardware store and check that you get the correct size ...


2

Moisture pooling in the joints like that suggests standing water in the pipe, which will eventually rust it out for sure. If this is the case, there's probably a blockage of some sort downstream that's resulting in sewage backup (ew). I would definitely address that first. After that, you can decide whether or not it's worth replacing pipe. My guess is that ...


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Cast Iron drain pipe with Bell fittings, these are packed with oakum and overlaid with hot poured lead driven in place to seal and then a second layer poured in to complete the seal. It may only need the lead driven in to repack the oakum and a new layer of lead poured. Contact a plumber with knowledge about old drain systems, cast iron can take a long ...


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I'm not sure I completely understand what you mean by "twist." You mention a 45 degree bend. Is that the bend of the elbow? Why was a "twist" required? At any rate, if it is holding, it will probably be fine under static loads even if installation was not perfect. However, a bad joint will typically only reveal itself under more extreme dynamic loads. ...


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The pipe shall have holes pointed up , the pipe shall be at least 6" below whatever you are trying to avoid water getting into , for a foundation it shall be 8" away in a trench 45 degrees so you do not undermine the soil bearing and 8" below the bottom of the footing with holes pointing up


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Purchase 14" x 6' length of shower liners. It comes in 6' widths so you have to buy the 6' but it only takes 14" to wrap around the pipe. If the section of the damage is smaller than 14", then you could buy a smaller piece. At my plumbing store it is sold by the square ft. for $2. So, for the piece that I stated at the beginning, it cost me $7. Then ...


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Galvanized floor flanges for the roof attachment (seal with roof cement) EMT connectors, to screw into flanges and tees EMT elbows and galvanized pipe tees and other fittings as needed I have built several low cost awnings like this, it ain't pretty but it is cheap. Those other specialty fittings referred to on other replies are designed for ...


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Since this seems to be a temporary canopy, messing around with the roof's integrity (by adding a few attachments) is probably not desirable: it will cause premature aging of the roof and increase the probability of a leak. Obviously it can be done, for example solar panels on a roof, but that adds ongoing maintenance to make sure the fastening system is ...


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FYI: A neighbor (in the physical world) wondered by and had the perfect tool. Expanded details: https://ello.co/cwhii/post/W6vBG5nnYlOSFK6ciW0SBw


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Swivel Pipe Flange: (amazon.com) Railing Fittings: (hollaender.com, the site has all sorts of stuff like this) Google search: (boat canopy chrome swivel joints): (sheridanmarine.com, accepts 7/8 {sounds like 3/4 EMT to me} ;)


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Mazura's answer describes the best solutions. But if there really is only 0.33" inside the pipe and part of the broken pipe remnant is protruding from the intact pipe, you might be able to manage without special tools if you take a slim metal-cutting hacksaw blade and carefully saw a channel all the way through the wall of the pipe fragment, parallel to ...


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Screw Extractor: (cromwell.co.uk, #3 is what you need, I think. Finding them at a real store and comparing actual sizes might help) For larger sizes, use an Internal Pipe Wrench: (plumbingsupply.com)


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Pinholes are a sign of a poor sweat job or defective pipe. I would replace the entire length of pipe with PEX, removing any possible catastrophic leak.


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It depends on where the actual leaks are. If the leaks are at the solder joint, then this would indicate poor workmanship from the installer. If the pipes themselves are developing pinholes, then you could have gotten a bad batch of copper pipe that had impurities in it. Recycled copper used for pipes can have impurities in them which can lead to pinhole ...


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I would fill the wall around the pipe with hydraulic cement to get a water-tight seal. Both the PVC and the rubber boot need UV protection. Those should be buried under at least 6 inches of dirt (that was the recommendation of the inspector when I had to do a similar repair).


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There is a product made specifically for this problem. It is called ThermGuard and is a tiny microcomputer that attaches to your thermostat. It is programmable to run the heat zone for a specific number of minutes with a programmable delay. For instance, you can program it to run for 3 minutes every two hours. This will circulate enough water to keep ...



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