New answers tagged

1

It sounds like the two pipes are not parallel, so with two 45 bends once one bend is installed, the other won't align with the other pipe; correct? The Fernco flexible coupling suggested may work, but it has a limitation on how many degrees of deflection is allowable. One solution is to put on one 45 bend, then two 90 bends for angle adjustment, then connect ...


2

As @ JPhi1618 has stated try adding a second clamp on the top of the shelves. Before trying that I would try bolting the shelves to the smaller hinge pin hole. For visual appearance sake I would try either a carriage bolt or a flat head screw that is counter sunk.


3

Your problem is there's nothing holding the 4 posts in place. The fix is to attach the shelves to the posts as tightly as possible - they can't just set on the posts. What you've basically done is tried to create a large version of these common steel shelves: If you've ever put one together, the strength and stability comes from the wedge anchors on ...


1

If the valve handle is any indication for what its' function may be, than there is a very likely chance that it is a shut-off valve for: A. water supply (for flat above?) or B. sprinkler system (not likely). The valve type is either a "gate" or a "globe". Either of them are designed to control water (liquid or vapor) flow. Additionally both valve's have a ...


1

Try picking it up. No, really, are you sure it's actually connected from something? It looks like a leftover piece of material that was leaning against the structure until it got kind of stuck in the ground. Maybe it's a random piece of junk stuck into the ground by another bidder, to trick the current holder into accepting a lower price. If this proves to ...


0

My best guess is a septic vent that was too close to the house, so it was left long to get noxious gases above window height. In my area, vents are typically 3" PVC.


0

It should drain to daylight or a well constructed drain field. Apparently, it does neither, hence the blockage. Possibly, blocked from lint build-up from the washing machine or was poorly constructed in the first place. Rent a longer snake insert it all the way to the blockage and try to clear it. If you can't clear it, use a metal detector to find the ...


0

I decided to use 1 inch steel black pipe (commonly used for gas lines). The reasons are that: I don't need any special equipment, the pipe is inexpensive and it will make a good first test run to see if the design will work. Thanks to all for the good suggestions. I up voted them all.


15

You only have to replace the wax ring if the toilet leaks. It's wise to replace it whenever you remove the toilet, though. It's not a matter of age, but the fact that a wax ring is intended to be a single-use item. They squish into place when you set a toilet, and that can't happen very well more than once. It's certainly possible that you achieved a ...


0

Monkey wrench. But on its own will cause damage to the nickel. To avoid damage use a tough rubber lining in between the contact parts. The wrench works by getting the gap to a close enough size as the part you want to un/tighten, when you apply force to the handle, it starts to compress the gap, exerting grip torque while unscrewing in the axis your are ...


2

You can often determine the whether the threading is right or left handed by looking closely at the first thread between the edge of the fitting. Your picture is not clear enough to tell this from the photo but this shows where to look. That said it is a pretty good guess that you would turn as shown below to remove. This is the conventional direction for ...


2

If this is the average fireplace, some thick walled corrosion resistant alloy like 304 stainless sch 40 pipe would work great. Exotic alloys like inconel would be needed if it was something like a forced air wood furnace with the flame directed at the metal.


2

Cast iron. Which is conveniently already in the configuration you need at your local scrap yard: old radiators. That is, assuming this doesn't have to be potable. Other than that I'd guess we're talking about some expensive exotic steel you probably can't wield very easily anyway, like lab equipment. I'd like to think that regular old black pipe would ...


3

That looks like a double-ended compression coupling. It is used because most people cannot spin their sinks or houses around to unscrew them. Use a pipe wrench to unscrew both ends of that coupling to gain better access to the pipe.


1

The white "T" fitting is called a push fit connector. The white lip where the 1/4 inch hose goes in needs to be pushed the opposite way that you're pulling the hose...e.g. push it down with one hand and pull the hose with the other. To reconnect you just need to make sure the hose end is nice and straight then push in fully - it will grab.


0

I have owned one for years, it aids insertion and helps remove tailings that otherwise would flow down the line necessitating more thorough flushing (or maybe plugging something up). It's a good practice but no requirement. As for CPVC cleaner or primer, follow the directions on your can of cement.


1

About the only reason I could see to chamfer the end is that it would seat a mm or 2 deeper in the fitting. In that the glue is solvent welding the plastic, I doubt it makes a lot of difference in the strength of the joint. That said, I don't see that it would be a problem if it helps in joining unless you overdo it (like sharpen the end). As far as I know, ...


0

I think it is clear that stainless steel has a longer shelf life than copper - or at least the copper available to most for residential plumbing. However I think there are two really significant issues with stainless steel that would cause me to never use it for my own house: stainless steel is galvanized and that will probably produce lead to the water ...


0

Depending on which type, Stainless is the better option: Corrosion resistant, strong, durable and can withstand temperatures colder and hotter than you'll likely need and won't leach harmful chemicals or minerals / metals into your water supply. The disadvantages are the pipe is hard to cut or bend and could crack or burst if the water freezes in the pipes ...



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