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2

Another option in addition to the other answers is a cleanout/inspection line for the weeping system. If you're far enough north that there's still ice in mid-March, weeping systems are a must-have to prevent foundation damage from frost heaves. Quick test; if it smells like sewer gas, it's a sanitary sewer cleanout. If it smells like earth, mildew or just ...


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If it's a sewer cleanout you should be able to detect noxious gasses emanating from the pipe once the cap is removed. To double check; have a helper flush a toilet while you listen for running water with the cap removed. My first thought when I viewed the photo was that it was a field drain with the grate removed and someone used a test cap to cover the ...


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This is an interesting problem. I'm wondering if you can bury your water supply line so that it would be unaffected by the frozen ground temperature? (Think below perma-frost and ground heave). Also, if the water is being piped a short distance from building that is already being heated maybe an auto draining valve (as @Ecnerwal mentioned) could be installed ...


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You need a "frost-proof hydrant" (which will have a garden hose thread, not a fire hose thread.) That is a valve that is buried below frost line. On the hose side of the valve, there is a small, deliberate leak (this should not leak when the valve is open.) When the valve is closed, the leak drains water from the standing part of the pipe. Without heat, ...


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Has ANYONE actually set-up various french drain configurations behind clear plexiglass (cut away-like an ant farm display) to see (for real) how it performs? In my 'minds eye', the possibility of collapse (despite the corrugations (I've seen crunched perforated pipe at the store!)) and the idea of standing water within the corrugations makes the flex pipe ...


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The issue is not 'what is in favor' but what the building code requires. Here is a general rule: toilet: 3" or 4" washing machine and shower: 2" sinks: 1 1/2" nothing smaller. combined vent through roof must be equal or greater than size leaving the home to sewer or septic. This is just a guideline - I take it you are not hiring a plumber to do this work. ...


3

Find a better store, if the ones you are going to don't have 2" PVC in full sticks (or possibly look higher up in the store you are in, and get someone to drag it down.) In MY house, the only place you'll find 1-1/2 or 1-1/4" is the tailpieces on the sinks - as soon as it hits pipe, it goes up to 2", because it's not that much more expensive and it greatly ...


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According to National Electrical Code, the pipe has to be bonded. However, it can be bonded using the grounding conductor serving the equipment that uses the gas. ...The equipment grounding conductor for the circuit that is likely to energize the piping shall be permitted to serve as the bonding means... As for lightning strikes, the gas company is ...


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I'm not sure why you want to divert the vent, as rain and birds are not much of a concern when it comes to plumbing vents. Getting rain into the vent is not a problem, as the vent leads to the sewer. The amount of water that will end up down the vent during a rain storm is trivial, and won't hurt anything at all. I've heard of birds falling down ...


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You really don't want the vent pipe opening near a window, because of the possibility of the sewer odor coming back into the house. That's why vents are on the roof in the first place — any breeze quickly carries the odors away. To answer your specific question, yes, vent pipes can have horizontal runs, as long as there is no possibility of them ...



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