New answers tagged

1

Pay now or pay later. Galvanized pipes inevitably fail over time because they crud up from the inside which constricts flow. This reduces the thickness of the wall, so if the flow doesn't get you, the failure of the wall will. Having said that, 3" is huge, so it would probably take a while before you noticed flow constriction. You'd still have a problem ...


0

You can hit the concrete with a sledge and it may put out. Go around all the way with the sledge. Another option is to cut it off a foot or so off the ground and then hit the pipe with a sledge to knock it though and break free of the concrete. If you have a bobcat or an good ole truck you can pull it over by attaching a rope or chain to the top of the ...


1

What I would do: Cut the long pipe. Move the radiator, making both cut pieces accessible. Remove and and discard both pieces of the long pipe. Unscrew the elbow-and-tee assembly from the radiator. Replace the short nipple with two short nipples connected by a union. Replace the long pipe with a longer pipe to account for the added length of the added ...


0

"I'm not a plumber, nor a plumber's son..." but having watched them working with threaded pipe the trick seems to be finding the places where there is enough freedom for things to become longer (as the threads in both ends back out). In this case ... lemme check the photo again ... it looks like that coupling piece between the radiator and the L connector ...


0

I came across this website which is fantastic. It has both 2 and 3 conductor wire, with some optional style choices as well. http://vintagewireandsupply.com/by-the-roll-1/ Exactly what I'm looking for


2

You should be able to purchase a three wire cord with a molded three prong grounding plug on one end open wire ends on the opposite end. These are often sold as electrical appliance replacement cords and should be available at most good hardware stores and big box type outlets. Here is an example of one type of these cords: Make sure to use proper ...


1

Tap with hammer. Breaks up all the dry paint to the core. Gently tap and use a putty knife with hammering technique to remove where it gets hats to tech. The tapping breaks up the paint.


0

This is most likely connected to your house roof down pipe. Should be able to find out if your roof down pipes are not connected to drainage they likely go down the side of your house and enter the ground; probably a small water trap made from cement at the side of your house. The water trap will have a drainage pipe similar to phot you have shown running ...


6

It's an NDS Pro pop-up drainage emitter http://www.ndspro.com/catalog/category/view/s/pop-up-emitters/id/227/ I took the approach of noticing the acronym on the cap, figuring out what company it was and seeing which of their products match.


15

This could be part of a larger yard drainage system. It could let water from the screened end of the pipe drain out into some buried drain field. It could also drain onto a deep buried french drain construction consisting of a sizeable hole that was filled with crushed rock or similar. The fact that the part of the pipe that has the screen is working its ...


13

Looks like a rain gutter or sump pump outlet. Place a noisy device directed into it and walk around and listen. You could probably bury the white pipe and just leave the grille exposed, flush with the lawn.


0

It looks like a standard braided supply line. available at practically any hardware store in various lengths



Top 50 recent answers are included