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It's common practice to use duct seal or other similar products, to seal around utility penetrations. Properly installed, it should keep all types of pests out.


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This is a common issue that is often ignored or dealt with in shoddy ways. First, yes, set a mouse trap and get rid of the mouse. Then deal with the hole. You may find an escutcheon that will fit around the gas pipe. Gas pipes may be many different sizes. To keep the mouse from pushing it up you could use a pipe clamp above it and/or glue to secure the ...


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Most lamps have a two-prong plug. All the lamps in my house, even the ones with metal casings, have two-prong plugs. I don't think you have a safety problem. However -- if I were building this lamp, I would attach a three-prong grounding plug and cord, just because the aesthetic of the lamp is so obviously 'heavy industry' and most heavy industrial ...


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It is hard to tell from the photos they give -- but most metal lamps in the USA are of similar (Class 0) construction from an electrical-safety standpoint, so it's not more dangerous than a COTS metal lamp. If you wanted to make it safer -- run spaghetti tubing over the lamp cord running through the lamp body, and use a few wraps of insulating Mylar or ...


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Were this my project I'd cut off the fitting flush with the floor and find out exactly how close to normally the flange fits. The inside of elbow should be the same size as the inside of the pipe. If possible, I'd make slight adjustments to the flange by sanding or grinding, then glue it in using primer and PVC adhesive. I'd then be sure to securely anchor ...


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My mom used to bring well water back from the lakehouse for rinsing her hair; installed a shelf for those blue 5 gallon water jugs, which weigh ~40 pounds. It seems you have a 2.5 gallon bucket, with a handle that will put the weight out at least a few inches (more like half a foot, plus). I would not do this. Perhaps a hook in the ceiling or on the wall? ...


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It is hard to say without opening the wall you may have a metal pipe coming out of the wall and PVC or CPVC, copper or Galvanized pipe. With galvanized pipe it might be strong enough if the pipe is strapped to a stud but you would be taking a chance.


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Definitely do NOT fill them with cement. At least not the parts you grab onto. You could probably fill the base bars (the ones that actually touch the floor) if you simply want a little more weight to stabilize it but since the ends are capped, sand/gravel would accomplish the same task and I really think you are underestimating the sturdiness of PVC here. ...


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A cheap option, is hanger strap. It's available in both metal and plastic, and in various sizes.


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I like PVC strap tape. You can hang it about anywhere with about anything. It doesn't kink up like metal, and it isn't sharp.


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If you don't care how it looks, just put some screw eyes in the wall above where you want the duct work to be, and loop some wire around the duct work and attach both ends to the screw eye. Quick and easy. As an aside comment, if there is a significant difference in temperatures between the air going through the duct work and the air outside, you may ...


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For future reference, this tool is made for just that purpose: Basically, it's an easy-out for drain ends. Here's a link to one on Lowe's web site, albeit a dead one, but it's where I bought mine.


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What I ended up doing, was using a heavy duty pair of pliers to grasp on to the drain flange. Then another pair of hands, also using heavy duty pliers, turning the tail piece. I was originally trying to do this on my own, and couldn't grasp the drain and turn the tail piece at the same time. Extra pair of hands did the trick. It's also possible that I ...



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