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There is a product made specifically for this problem. It is called ThermGuard and is a tiny microcomputer that attaches to your thermostat. It is programmable to run the heat zone for a specific number of minutes with a programmable delay. For instance, you can program it to run for 3 minutes every two hours. This will circulate enough water to keep ...


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1-1/4 is probably the thread size on the bottom (standard pipe threads.) The threaded part that's currently exposed is the radiator union connection, and may fit a 1-1/4" union, or it may be an odd size specific to the radiator, depending on how that company was playing the game at the time. If its a 1-1/4 union thread, you'd need to buy a 1-1/4 union and ...


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Hire a water tank truck. Some pool supply stores have them; or depending on the state of your community you might be able to strike a deal with the fire department, subject to no fires happening at the time. Park the (empty) truck, pump the water into it, fix the outlet, pump the water back into the pool. The fire department may be able to treat it as a ...


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Copper Is the best for water and healthy , using steel hard to cut and bend above that not healthy


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You can buy (or maybe rent) a wire tracer like this: The power wire to the well would have to be disconnected from power and the left box connected to the loose wire. Then walk around with the sensor near the ground and see where the wire goes. Its range is reduced by the soil so if the wire is very deep (> 18 inches?), it may not work so well.


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In general, yes, stainless steel is more corrosion resistant than copper. It forms a tightly bonded oxide coating which tends to prevent further corrosion. If replumbing a house where copper pipes corroded (this is more prone to happen in some areas than others due to water chemistry differences) my first instinct at this point would be to use PEX plastic ...


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When in doubt, Call Before You Dig (your gas, power, water and telco companies). Your municipality may have a system in place to make this easier, E.g, 811. They will come out and mark where their utilities are so you don't hit them. Concrete footings must begin below the frost line. Hopefully you don't find it when digging out for the footings. Rebar gives ...


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One safety note: if you at ask think there is a chance you can hit the line, turn off power to your pump while you are working. Better safe than sorry. Depth First of all, the water lines are almost always buried below the frost line. There are exceptional cases where bedrock prevents this, and if there is no other path the lines may be shallower with ...


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If your water does not freeze up in the winter, they are presumably buried below frost line for your area - which is typically where they do get put by competent installers (and not terribly deep if there is no frost.) In my area that's 4-5 feet, typically. In most but not all cases it will probably be the shortest, most direct path from where it comes out ...



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