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21

You should be able to tell by the color, and connections used. Gas "Black pipe" is commonly used for natural gas, and is dark grey/black. All connections will be threaded. Water Water lines come in a variety of materials, some of the most common are. Copper This will be um... copper, in color. While there are other ways to join copper pipes, ...


19

I'd say it's a mark left by the plumber's torch while soldering the copper pipes rather than an electrical problem.


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


11

Yes it's normal and what you want. It's called a P-trap and the water sitting in there seals out the sewer gasses. My ASCII P-trap: \ / | | __________ | | _________ \ / / \*\__/*/ \****/ ---- The asterisks would be the water that forms the stopper. In an empty home ...


11

Though it may seem odd, it is possible the plumber knows what he's talking about. If this is a Polybutylene pipe, it could indeed be brittle and fail if it's jostled during the installation of the filter. It's impossible to tell from the picture what type of pipe that is, but based on the plumbers concern I'd guess it is Polybutylene. Polybutylene ...


10

Part of the cause of this may be turbulent vs. laminar flow. A high temperature will have a lower viscosity, leading to a higher Reynolds number, which contributes to turbulent flow. Add in surface defects from mineral build up, and you've got enough turbulence to vibrate your pipes to 'banshee levels.'


10

A short freeze should not be a big deal for your area. I just bought some of the spigot covers for mine. I live in Virginia and have a bit colder temps than you do. Normally we have no problems with our area either. I just covered them to make sure.


10

I suspect you actually have two questions: 1) Does it meet current code, and 2) Do I have to do something about it. My understanding is that in most places you can't do anything new with lead gas pipe, BUT there's no obligation to upgrade old service as long as it's working OK. My understanding is that most places won't even let you replace lead pipe ...


10

I'd use a small tubing cutter to cut tidy/clean ends on both ends of the 1/4" copper pipe ... ... cutting off whatever portions of the 1/4" copper pipe are kinked or deformed. I'd then slip on a compression fitting called a 'union' ... ... which requires tightening with a pair of wrenches. Wikipedia has a general article on compression fittings here. ...


9

Something like this should do the job: Source - UK site, but you should be able to source this in the States. It's split down the length so you can wrap it round existing pipes. It's flexible so you can do corners and bends too.


9

Unfortunately, you have gotten yourself into a situation that is most likely going to require opening the wall to replumb the water supplies and possibly the drain. If you have access to the back through another wall, then you will not have to remove some tiles. If you don't have access, then you have to open it up from the front, not an easy job. The ...


9

Yes, it's common. In fact, nearly all modern residential construction uses plastic PEX piping (and it's widely considered superior to copper). Now, perhaps your plastic pipe is wrong... but that would be interesting as it's no simple task to replace an entire water main... Can you take a better photo of the plastic pipe?


8

For rare freezes, you can turn on the faucet slightly, to drip a little. This will keep fresh warmer water coming in, and reduce the chance of freezing. If your house has a crawlspace with the plumbing, those pipes are potentially susceptible to freezing, too. This trick helps there, as well. Obviously, this is a waste of water if you have to do it more ...


8

In colder climates at least, the norm is to have either shutoffs, or frost-proof sillcocks. A shutoff is simply a valve on the inside of the house. You close it off, then open the outside tap, and the water drains out of the pipe in the wall. A frost-proof sillcock (pictured below) is a tap with a very long stem, so the shutoff is actually at the base ...


8

Copper has a well-proven track record Copper parts are more readily-available and it's easier to repair (eg, don't need the expensive crimping tool like with PEX) Safer during fires since it is much more resistant to heat and giving off fumes That said, I am a huge fan of PEX. It's been around for quite a few years now (though obviously nowhere near as ...


8

The concern that I know of is about the size of the pipe and all appliances that can be running at the other end. So if they ran out of a larger dimension pipe (or just had a lot of the smaller dimension) this would almost make sense. But I'd think any normal installer would try to minimize the parts cost and split it closer to the appliances. However, if ...


8

An overflow of suds is what you get when you use too much laundry detergent, or when you use a cleaning compound that is not intended for use in a washing machine. If you are using an appropriate product and you are getting excess foam (foaming out of the machine, or residual foam in the garments, or foaming out of the drain), cut the amount you use in ...


8

High efficiency furnaces will make condensate. They run the air back through the hot exhaust to get more heat out. This also cools your exhaust enough to use PVC - that's what your upper line is. In the process of cooling the exhaust, you might get some condensation. Typically that's collected in a little sump tank. When the sump reaches a certain level, a ...


8

If you dont want to run a new pipe you will need specific insulation Notice that this insulation has a shiny outside layer. This acts as a reflection for heat, and usually has a black/dark side on the inside. The foam/glass wool used to wrap the pipe needs not be anything special, but I am sure there are special ones that locks out heat better.. instead ...


8

Isn't that your water meter on the inside of your house, that the black city line feeds? Shouldn't the whole house water filter be going AFTER the water meter? In which case the black pipe is irrelevant, is it not? Which leads me to think - you need a different plumber.


7

More than likely it was an oil fuel line. It was very common to encase oil lines in the floor until recently. Gas would have been in black iron pipe. Maybe water, but 1/4 inch too small for anything but an ice maker in a fridge.


7

It's called a tap connector (obvious now I've found it), and you should be able to unscrew it. You can see one here It's the bottom nut you need to be turning. It's part of a joint that attaches the pipe to the tap. Once you have this off you should be able to remove the tap as normal. If it's stuck then something like WD40 or penetrating oil might help. ...


7

I haven't seen one for a small diameter pipe, but what you're looking for is some type of drain flange: The top is wider to hold it in the opening, the rubber washer is below to seal the connection, and then you use a metal washer and a nut to tighten it to the surface. With a small diameter pipe, you can improvise this with a threaded pipe and a second ...


6

The screaming one is probably limed up. You might try cleaning it with vinegar or lime away.


6

Faucets have screens on them. Your pipes shouldn't have deposits on them because the sediment will build-up on the bottom of the tank when it is being heated (the change in temperature and stagnation are the main reasons for the sediment falling out of solution -- neither of which happens in pipes,) and it shouldn't go out of the top. The screens on the ...


6

I wouldn't worry about the scum left over - what you really need to do is get rid of the BIG gunk that's catching the little gunk that eventually clogs your sink. For clogged drains, a hand held auger is your tool of choice for cleaning stubborn clogs out of bathroom pipes.


6

What Danny said - someone didn't use a flame shield while soldering the pipe. The soldering process involves blasting the copper pipe with a hot flame until the lead solder melts: A RESPONSIBLE plumber will use a flame retardant barrier while soldering. Whoever did your pipes just chose not to and nearly burned down your house. Sorry, so to answer your ...


6

There is absolutely no difference between the materials used for hot and cold water pipes (at least there isn't in the UK!). The same copper is used for both and if you have a piece of pipe that was previously used for hot water you can use for cold water and vice versa. As long as the pipes are connected up properly then there'll be no problems.


6

That's a drum trap, not a P-Trap. Be sure it's listed to comply with your code requirements. Looks slick anyway. You'll need a 45 degree chrome compression ell and maybe some extra pipe. You'll end up with the trap arm out of the drum running at a 45 degree horizontal angle to the wall. It will be cut quite short before it enters the ell. Upon exiting the ...


5

Try www.smallparts.com. I once got a quote from them for some .111 diameter aluminum balls. I see 0.15 and 0.16 stainless tubing. Ask if you don't see exactly what you need.



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