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yes you do. even if you drain it, its going to get water lying in low spots. that will rupture the line if it freezes. just make sure you slope it 1" in 4 ft to where you are going to drain it. that way it will have no water in it come freeze up. you can just mount it with stood off pex clamps


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Galvanized pipe can last a long time, without "failing". However, while the pipe might look great on the outside, the inside is likely restricted by corrosion and deposits. All galvanized pipe I've ever removed, looks something like this on the inside. My advice to anybody that still has galvanized pipe in their homes, is to replace it as soon as ...


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Galvanic corrosion occurs when galvanized steel is in direct contact with copper and creates pin holes in the copper from the inside out. Copper does not degrade the steel pipe. What does happen inside the steel pipes is rust/mineral deposits form on the interior walls much like arterial buildup in a human being restricting your water flow. Because the ...


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40-50 years is a fair lifespan. I've seen plenty of houses with galvi that was 60+ years old without it failing, the real issue to me is if you want to wait until it fails to replace it. Not greatly accelerated the process, no. Yes. Potentially and at decent expense. It depends on the size of the water service, condition of the piping, and access point. ...


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I have been plumbing for 14 years,and I switched to using stainless rings almost exclusively about 5 years ago. Being able to use just one tool from 3/8" up to 1" was too much of an advantage to ignore. I have never had an issue, or leak, that could be attributed to the ring/tool. I wouldn't advise getting rid of the standard set of copper ring crimpers ...


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I ended up getting a 1/2 to 1/4 SharkBite adapter, then a 1/4 to 1/4 stainless steel line to connect to the adapter on the pex. The pex does say 1/8 on it, but one of the posters correctly pointed out that's an inside diameter. Thanks all!


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It would be ideal to know what kind of connections you have on the manifold. Often the connectors can be replaced but it kind of sounds like you don't have that option (or why would you ask?). So, if you have barb connections, then yes, you have to be careful cleaning them... scratches cause problems. But if there is enough length on the barbed connector ...



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