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16

There are inexpensive child safety latches that can be placed out of sight in the interior of your cabinet. They are also easy to install and only leave a few small screw holes when removed. Some may use adhesive instead of screws, but they might be less dependable. Such a latch consists of a bendable plastic rod with a blunt hook on one side, and is ...


12

The best solution is to add a dig-out guard to your fence or dog run: Head to the home improvement store and pick up some galvanized sheet metal about 2 feet wide (corrugated or straight is fine; the stuff they use for roofing and sheathing outbuildings is perfect) With snips, a hacksaw or a Sawzall, cut the metal to workable lengths, maybe 3-4'. If it's ...


11

Coyote rollers, won't harm children like barb wire, is effective, and can be home owner installed. A Coyote Roller is a patented ribbed roller that mounts to the top of your fence. When a coyote or other predator tries to jump your fence to attack your pets, it requires them to grab hold of the top of a fence. With Coyote Rollers in place, the ...


11

There are several different types. There are magnetic knobs that require you to place a magnet over the catch before it's released - see here for an example. You leave the existing knobs on the doors which could give you hours of fun as you watch visitors pull at them and wonder why they can't open the door. There are physical catches you can get that ...


9

At the risk of sounding like an old school hold back, I gotta weigh in on laminate flooring. I have installed thousands of square feet of various wood and laminate flooring. Even though the new laminates tout the hard durable finishes and long warranties, the common weakness of laminate is that it is a picture of wood on some type of paper or synthetic base. ...


8

I'd get some Barbed Wire arms for the fence. Since a picture is worth 1000 words, However, the non technical answer is that it's legally your neighbour's problem. Depending on your jurisdiction, it might be legal to shoot the dog. Pitbulls are often great dogs. But they can also be awful dogs if owned by idiots.


7

A simple, no-modification approach that may work for you is to put rubber bands on pairs of knobs, thereby holding two doors closed. You may need strong rubber bands, or several of them.


4

It sounds like your cabinet doors are free-swinging and just rest against the cabinet without any type of initial resistance. If you just need some resistance to make it a little harder to open, I would check out cabinet latches, specifically look at the magnetic catch and roller catch options. Those options would be inside the cabinet and don't introduce ...


4

This answer is more a dog training answer than a DIY answer, but anyways.. All of the suggestions already provided are good for solving the fence problem, but ultimately, your dog will still try and dig, and might even injure themselves trying - especially if there is metal down there. My advice is to get a skat mat - this is a mat that puts off a mild ...


3

First thing first, do NOT use a reciprocating saw for this as this is dangerous and you could end up seriously injured. If looking for something to make this easy, what you need is a trencher - you can probably rent one from your local home improvement store. It will look something like this (there are smaller models but I couldn't find a good picture). ...


3

A friend at work told me this one: Buy a roll or two of clear double-sided tape and put it on the bottom of the door and the bottom of the door frame. When the cats scratch at it, their paws get stuck/sticky (they don't like this at all) and they'll soon learn not to scratch at the door.


3

you can use an automated air jet/spray that activates when the cat comes close to the door (just a link I found wile googling "cat repellent door" no affiliation)


3

This may not be the answer you're looking for, but I think it's your best option... Get video of your cat doing things like opening cabinets and pulling out envelopes. Put the video on YouTube. Watch as the view count hits 10,000,000. ??? Profit!


3

I've had friends who have put up metal kick/decorative plates and their dog/cat has still managed to scratch it up over time. Your best bet is to do something that is easily replaceable, whether that be painting or a quick changeable kickplate. Like shirlock said .... your dog is gonna scratch it .... dogs are persistent (yet lovable) in that way.


3

Hey Niall, Several coats (4-5?) of a good oil based urethane is gonna be the best protection, but even that is gonna show dog scratches eventually and won't protect the raised panel details that will get rounded over by Fido. Short of a protective barrier, like a piece of thin plexi, I don't know of a thing that will hold up to repetitive scratching, sorry.


2

take a short chain link fence and dig it in and tie the remaining part to the existing fence (as you should have dug it in in the first place) you can also add a tension wire or 2 to the bottom of the fence so it can't rise high enough for her to fit under. this will only work until she digs a ditch underneath where she can fit through


2

Cats are just as capable of digging as dogs are. Dogs are capable of digging to get to a trapped and tasty treat. The best thing I can recommend, after years of work to contain psychotic dogs when they're outside, is to have a full enclosure -- top, bottom, all four sides.


2

Use chain link fence slats. It will prevent the dog from climbing the fence and also give you privacy.


2

You could put an electric fence wire at the top. They make kits that contain a single wire and are powered by a battery and possibly have a solar charger. They do not harm animals and are usually put down near the ground to stop aninals from digging under.


2

If your dog is really just squeezing under the fence as you described in your question, I was in a very similar situation a few years ago, so here's how I solved the problem: Obtain 1/2" diameter wooden dowels to use as stakes. Cut them into pieces 12-18in long. Wrap one end in duct tape to prevent splitting during burial. Positioning each stake 1-2ft from ...


1

Vinyl plank will allow the urine to seep underneath, unless you use a sealant on the joints/seams. Even if it is properly installed. Using sheet vinyl will work perfect for your application. The only way urine or any other liquid could get underneath would be if a hole/tear was made into the vinyl from mistreatment or from a big spill seeping in from under ...


1

Why not something like a baby play yard (also called baby fence or baby gate). Some of them are expandable and have adjustable footprints. Images and links provided as examples. Not an endorsment of any goods or source.


1

I just finished doing this in my back yard yesterday (we just moved into a new house)! Well, I have a semi-permanent solution now, but did this at my old house and it turned out great. Basically, I used livestock fencing pinned to the ground and attached at the base of the chain link fence using steel wire. Measure your fence line, or at least the ...


1

I have two Rottweilers and one blue cattle dog. We had an existing chain link fence, our female Rottweiler climbed it, the male jumps it and our blue cattle dog just cleared it all together. We extended the height with 8 foot star pickets, some chicken mesh, 2 rolls of wire and hog ties. We spent a day putting up all around our yard. We threaded 3 rows of ...


1

Add an electric fence about 1 to 2 feet in front of your regular fence. You will have to train your dog about the new boundary by walking along the line of the new "invisiable" fence if he/she is used to being near the fence (with the new collar and device attached). Once trained, you dog shouldn't want to get near the chain link fence again. ...


1

Velcro! No weird or awkward latches or tricks to open it but difficult or impossible for kitties and children to open. You can use super glue to attach it and you're done. The longer the piece of Velcro is the harder it is to open. I suggest 2 inches of Velcro to both corners of the cabinet.


1

As the other answers have mentioned, I don't think there is a real solution. Our dog would scratch/chew at the bedroom door (solid wood, probably original from 1926) when we are gone and would take chunks out of it along with big scratchs. Luckily it was painted white so we were able to just use wood filler to patch it and repaint and you can't see the ...



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