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Ants are constantly seeking food and water to maintain the colony. When an ant locates either in your house it lays down a scent trail with pheromes that the rest of the worker ants use as a freeway into your home. The ideal way to ensure they never invade your home again is to wipe out the Queen and the worker ants. This is accomplished by tracing the ant ...


3

I have always had good luck with boric acid powder, it's hard to beat. It's very inexpensive, sold under various names, sometimes as a roach killer, but it kills most bugs. It's another thing that kills the whole colony if it's tracked back to the nest. It's odor free. It lasts a long time where you sprinkle it. You can apply the powder on the ...


3

That's a silverfish. They're harmless to people and they won't do any structural damage to your home, but they do like to eat starch, cellulose, carbs; they'll do damage to wallpaper, book bindings, clothing, that kind of stuff. They like to eat mold and fungi too, and they tend to live in dark, moist / damp places. As with any pest if you search around on ...


3

You've taken some good precautionary steps to eradicate the vermin from your house. But I'd like to suggest and comment on some of the tasks. The first job you should accomplish is to stop the rodent's point of entry. This can be done by walking the exterior perimeter of your house. Points of entry include: conduit penetrating the wall, air vents with holes ...


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In terms of what can be damaged, let's hope the bed bugs, for starters... ;-) 125 F is pretty warm, but it does fall short of, say, actual food cooking temperatures. That's a painfully sunny summer afternoon in Phoenix or Death Valley, but it isn't Dante's Inferno. I can't imagine it harming cereal (unless it was also humid). But I couldn't vouch for ...


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Do Not use foggers or sprays, you will spread them to every room in the house. These products will provide limited control, not pest elimination. Today's pest control industry has developed terrific baits for the German Cockroach as well as other roaches. The best over the counter roach bait that I recommend to people is Combat Roach Gel. It will cost you ...


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Googled this and your post was the first one I saw, I have the same gouges on my wall. After we sprayed it with bug spray stuff started flying out. They were the in ground termites. Perhaps your situation may be the same.


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To supplement the other answers that recommend a one-way pest exit door based on the comments that the current hole size and location will not accommodate such a door: You can always patch the current hole, create a new one for the door (preferably in an inconspicuous location if possible), and then either remove and patch up the new hole after you are sure ...


2

Looks to me like a mud dauber wasp nest, not egg pod. Mostly harmless to your house, though the nest may trap a bit of moisture; you could knock the nests off during the winter if so inclined, or when they'te no longer occupied. Mostly harmless to the occupants too; thrse are fairly polite wasps.


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There's probably a few air bricks behind your kitchen units. Nail bit of fine mesh over them outside.


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I believe you should contact a licensed exterminator. My experience with hard to reach burrowing insects or worms was dealt with by an exterminator who has access to products we do not. For example we have had problems with carpenter bees which travelled long distances through the beams. With a puff of some powder" which the creature carries back to the ...


1

That looks like a silverfish, one of the most ancient pests to perturb humans. They don't bite, but there is anecdotal commentary related to the spread of germs. Boric acid powder, used as directed, will help reduce their population.


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Find where they are coming from: follow the slimy tracks to whatever holes they are slipping through. Stop them from entering: seal up the holes. Prevent re-occurrence: keep all holes sealed; use snail/slug killer in outdoor planters adjacent to doors, windows, and holes.


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I think it is on topic as the OP said worried about dammage. If you are in the U.S. most counties have an extension office or extension service office. (That’s what they call it here anyway). I have taken both plants & critters I could not identify. The plant turned out to be a poisonous broad leaf plant (they came out and killed the plants for free). ...


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Since the Pest Controller didn't find any pest cause or problem, very good news. Go ahead & patch, tape & mud it. Make sure the patch doesn't touch the masonry. The moisture down there may get it again or any paper break. If it starts happening all over, eventually, then painted fiberglass faced drywall would last or you might opt for cement board at ...


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There are two solutions that should be easier and cheaper than cement or mortar. Cement could certainly work, if you can get it to stay in place while it dries. Get some steel wool, which mice won't chew through, and a can of spray foam such as Great Stuff (there's even a pest repellent version of it available at Home Depot). Stuff steel wool around the ...


1

If an area rodents can infiltrate is considered subject to physical damage, then cables run inside finished walls, between joists in attics, etc. would certainly have to be considered to be subject to physical damage. Everything is subject to physical damage in the strictest sense. In context, it's clear the code means subject to physical damage in the ...


1

If you run the cable through a cage full of rats, then yes. Other than that, it's going to be up to the Authority Having Jurisdiction to make the call. They have a better understanding of the local conditions, and can make a more informed decision.


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You may be able to find a UF cable that has a rodent repellent in it, but it's certainly not standard. I have never seen it advertised on UF product packaging. I have heard that some datacom / telecom cables that claim to have a rodent repellent jacket, and I have seen those same cables chewed to bits by some varmint that didn't mind the flavor. If you ...


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You will need to install a one way pest door at the entrance they are using. Here is an example of one I found on amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Tomahawk-Excluder-One-Way-Door/dp/B00B9JVD7K


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Usually the way this is handled is by installing one-way doors so that the squirrel can exit but not re-enter. They will exit throughout the day to obtain food, the exception being very young babies. I think at this time of year it is unlikely to have young babies in there, so you are probably safe (humane?) to use the one-way door and just wait for them ...


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I must agree that the question is largely unanswerable. However, your problem now is no longer "where" are they entering. Squirrels are very determined little critters. So, now that they have decided your home is theirs, your greater concern is changing their minds. There are three options: Find where you think the most likely entry point is and set up a ...


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Bayer make a terrific product called Top Choice. It is a one time application for year long Fire Ant control. It is a restricted use product so you licensed pest control professional will have to apply it if it is allowed on the label for your area. Spread rate is 84 lbs. per acre and may run around $300.00 an acre. Rate is 2 lbs. per 1,000 sq. ft. Re-Entry ...



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