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As keshlam mentioned, always start with pressure treated lumber. Beyond that keep it sealed/stained every year, it doesn't sound like you will have much wood left once you replace with the composite so it should be pretty easy. This helps prevent rot and splitting and can keep insects away. It will also help prevent things growing in and on the wood.


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Pressure-treated lumber, or one of the tropical hardwoods which develops its own insecticides, should be proof against both termites and carpenter ants for many years. Outside of that, catch and fix rot early, since carpenter ants are most likely to move into wood that has already suffered some damage.


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Diatomaceous earth is used by bed bug control professionals as one tool among many, but the best recourse is professional help. If you have an home owner's association or are renting, they should be alerted and have funds to cover some of the costs. TALK TO A BEG BUG PROFESSIONAL. Initial consultations are usually free. Otherwise, additional basic ...


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Tracked down thanks to Ken at BugGuide. It's a booklouse


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Looks like an American Oil Beetle. http://www.insectidentification.org/beetles.asp


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Just mix baking soda with vinegar and you will get all the CO2 you want. Make sure that the jar is big enough because this reaction causes bubbles; the liquid will expand. Also, keep one more thing in mind CO2 is heavier than air meaning that you should somehow put the zapper inside the jar so it would be near CO2 and not over it; because I don't think that ...


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Most mosquito traps produce carbon dioxide by burning propane: http://home.howstuffworks.com/mosquito-magnet2.htm


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No you shouldn't. If you put animal bait there, a stray rodent might find its way in there and perhaps die, which would cause a stinky problem after a few days. If you did a sufficient job sealing up the area with spray foam, the problem shouldn't come back!



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