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I see that they are not very thick (one inch), but perhaps they are still heavy enough (5.4 lbs each). If you dig the dirt out, so that the top of the paver is level with the soil, then the paver should be held in place by the edge of the soil. Sand between them will help keep them from moving. There are also paver edge retstraints that you can buy/use:


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Since nobody else it going for this, then I'll give my two cents (based on limited experience, so please, anyone else feel free to chime in). When it comes to concrete roads, for example, after patching it a few times the road eventually becomes too worn out, and the concrete is rubblized (into crush and run). Then fresh pavement is layed on top. Here's a ...


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While the polymeric "sand" may last a big longer, I would just as soon see least small-grain plastic released into the wild. Real sand is just crushed rock, is completely inert so far as animal digestive tracts are concerned, and so on. Plastic detritus from all sorts of trash sources (either originally microparticles such as in body washes or broken-down ...


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I live in the Pacific Northwest also. I have done several paver walks, I have used regular sand and polymeric sand. What I have found is a good even base is the most important part of the job. Regular sand tends to need a new bag about every 3 years and polymeric is going on 5 but will need an add this year. For me both tend to grow grass because our horses ...


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What could go wrong? The concrete pavers are slightly porous and will wick water every time it rains. This will keep water against the wood deck boards for much longer than normal and will shorten the life of the wood. So, less sealing but shorter deck life. I would find a good oil based sealer like tung or timber oil that will last for more than one ...



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