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1

While it wouldn't necessarily hurt I see absolutely no need to do this. I wouldn't bother. Some websites suggest it will change the appearance of the slabs? Sealant will change the appearance, this is neither inherently good or bad. It will give it a more...wet look most likely, similar to waxing a floor or sealing wood. Some site also say you need to ...


2

Smells high, but hard to be sure. Older and presumably less expensive implementations seen under sidewalks use more of a concrete grid with small pieces of frosted glass - better relative strength and modesty preserved, but no stargazing from the basement. And, if the glass was broken (it's usually quite robust) there's no chance of people falling through ...


2

Coarser sand is better. Concrete sand would work much better than mason sand. When I used to do pavers we would use crusher dust. That being said, it's a patio and not a driveway or a road, so I don't think I would be overly concerned if I had already put down mason's sand.


1

As long as the steps are not attached to anything and the patio has a good mortar base and a packed gravel underbed then it should support the steps. During the winter ground moves up and down due to freezing/thawing, so the steps cannot be attached to anything, because the whole patio will be moving up and down during the winter. If the patio is old and ...


0

Use a level, and compact the base to the correct level so that when bricks are placed on it the resulting surface will be level. Choice of levels ranges from surveyor's total station on down to water in a clear hose. The aim is the same in all cases. Note that the patio may not really be "level" - it should have a very slight slope away from the house to aid ...


1

I wouldn't go forward with that plan. Diverting the water three feet away from the foundation won't stop the water from getting to your foundation. You need to put a french drain in and ensure that there is an outlet for the water to go somewhere where it won't damange anything. You can buy premade french drain material at your local home improvement ...


0

You can, but horizontal is better since they will cross more rafters, enabling better straddling and distribution of joints, minimizing cupping at the butt-joints, and will have less linear feet of joints sharing rafters (24' vs. 36')


2

If it is plywood you are using, it will be difficult to nail into by hand. The plywood is more stable across the joists rather than with the joists. When you run the plywood with the joists and try to nail into it between rafters the plywood will give so much the nails will hardly take if you are driving them by hand. I would not do it this way. It sounds ...



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