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14

Great question. Adding this addition requires a really good, deep, compacted base. I would isolate it from the building by 1/2 inch, but if the base is good, rebar to the existing pad will help stop any displacement. You have to expect some settling, but the better the base, the smaller the amount. Web rebar won't help much, but 3/8 or 1/2 inch bar will hold ...


8

If the cost of raising the patio is too great you could get an angle grinder or perhaps a better choice would be renting a concrete wet saw and cut out a strip about 6 inches wide from the edge that meets the house wall. As @woodchips points out in his comment, make sure you wear gloves, safety goggle and a mask for this. It'll get hot, but it's very dusty ...


7

I just completed a 90 square foot patio. I ended up putting down 4 inches of paver base (crushed concrete), 1 inch of sand, and then the 2 inch patio stones... so I dug down 7 inches all around. To be honest though, I went deeper than that in some places and ended up having to bring in much more paver base (crushed concrete) than I really needed. So maybe ...


6

It really depends on what part of the country you are building in. The method is much different in the frozen north than the sunny south. I do not like crushed stone with a gravel overcoat. the sand will eventually settle into the stone and leave voids under the pavers.. I am a firm believer in stone dust. 3/8 stone dust, wetted and compacted is like a ...


6

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but there is no magic solution you can spray on and restore the original beauty. As an owner or an older Carver with lots of teak, the only solution is to sand it down. We solved the every year restoral ritual by using Seatrol medium sealer by Sikens. (found in marine stores) Couple of coats of this stuff and your teak ...


5

My wife and I collected an assortment of old house wall bricks from various sources on craigs list and put them down in a patio in the mid-Atlantic a couple years ago. They're on packed gravel and sand with no mortar, laid flat in a herring bone pattern. We've had only one issue which is that some of the bricks were of the softer, less dense variety (light ...


5

What you are looking for is a joint sand stabilizing sealer. That should prevent washout as well as weed growth in the joints.


5

You could make a path with crushed rock or stones (maybe crushed rock in between) and surround the path with a cheaper ground cover like pine straw/mulch where you could eventually put plants. This way you allow access to where the area leads and avoid having to cover everything with the expensive stuff.


5

What about putting down sod to give the area a jump start?


5

With only 15lbs, two screws (one on each side) ought to do just fine. Just drill into the mortar with a hammer drill and an appropriately sized bit, then use either a sleeve type anchor with the screws, or you could just use a couple tapcon type screws as well.


5

No that is not true at all. Maybe your contractor was thinking of mortar but a) no contractor should be confusing those and b) even if you used mortar, it'd still be repairable (albeit with a bit more work).


4

You could mix up a fine sand & cement mixture brush that into the gaps then water the patio to turn that into mortar in place. You'd need to make sure the patio was clean first, and don't use too much water. Though this would be a fairly permanent solution.


4

In the short term, you could waterproof the foundation with some sealant paint like Drylok. Longer term, you need to fix the problem by directing water away from the house. Is there cracking where the patio meets the house? That would indicate subsidence at that side of the patio, at which point I would definitely call in the professionals. The next ...


4

Without seeing the "damage" I can't say for sure, but your best bet would be to try and even things out a bit, and accept that you aren't going to get a perfect finish. Use a finer grade steel wool and try and blend the patches so you don't have a sharp transition between the colours. You might find that leaving it over a winter will even out the ...


4

You could probably rent a saw like this from your local hardware store. They will usually have a diamond tipped masonry blade. You'll also want to make sure it's a wet saw or you keep the stones wet as you cut, as the dust from cutting concrete can make a real mess and be harmful to your health. You may also be able to find a splitter like this. The ...


4

Out patio has plastic edge restraints that are placed into the ground with 12" spikes. They get covered up with the mulch on the non paver side and then brace the pavers on the other side. Seems pretty easy to work with. The label on ours says "Paver-Grip Edge Restraint by Unilock" but I can't find that on the Unilock site. But here are a few ...


4

You can lay a soldier course of the pavers to edge the patio, and then lay a wedge of concrete to lock the soldier course in place. You can cover over the concrete with dirt after it cures. (Image Credit)


4

I have been researching this topic a lot lately. I have even done a few test squares. The Acid staining is awesome. You should search for "acid stain" on Youtube. There are countless ways to do it, so watch a whole bunch of those videos and you will get a get idea of it, and some good ideas of what you can do. But here are the basics: Clean the ...


4

If you have no space in a garage or shed (like me) then outside is your only option. I use a 20'x20' plastic tarp tied around my four patio chairs and table on my deck. They've survived 6 Minnesota winters. After a big snowfall, sometimes I'll sweep the snow off if it accumulates.


4

What you need to know is the rough opening size. This is the dimensions between the vertical studs and the horizontal dimension from the floor to the bottom of the header. You may have to remove some trim to see these components. If you are going to have a contractor install the new door, have that person give you the proper measurements for the replacement ...


4

No tips other than doing it properly. Otherwise the pavers will be all wonky and wavy within 1-2 years in most cases. You could try digging down the height of paver, compacting a little, putting pavers in and fill cracks with dirt and planting grass in the cracks. No guarantees from me on the result over time though. Chance of this working out would ...


3

As mentioned by DA01, acid staining could be a good choice. There is just something to keep in mind with it though. Acid staining is somewhat transparent/translucent though. Is your patio free of permanent marks for example? When my wife and I built our current come, we considered acid staining, but one of the cautions was that we needed to keep the ...


3

See How to build a french drain This is exactly the purpose for one. They are made to drain water from areas that have poor drainage from clay in the soil or other problems, I would put it in right on the edge of the grass and the brick. That way the water from the grass will flow into it before reaching the brick and the water from the brick will flow ...


3

It's possible that your pavers had a sealant that you scrubbed away in those spots. This article has a before and after picture; do your pavers looke similar? If you know who the supplier or manufacturer is, you could try asking them for advice. Failing that, buff out the scrubbed spots to blend in with the surrounding area, then reapply a sealant. ...


3

If you have a drainage issue, or you're likely to have freezing conditions, I'd personally want to lay a small coating of gravel across the concrete first - allow that pent-up water to get out of the way. If you're building this in, say, Phoenix, though, that may not really matter and laying them directly atop the concrete shouldn't be a problem. To the ...


3

It really depends mostly on the look you are going for, any kind of retaining wall blocks should work fine. The most important thing is making sure that you put down a good foundation for the bottom row of blocks. Make sure to trench it out a bit, put some gravel in the bottom of the trench and sand on top of that for good drainage and to prevent frost ...


3

The drawbacks of not using a proper base is that, over time, the pavers will sink and become completely uneven. If it's mainly a cost issue, I don't know if any real alternative that would be cheaper. If you stick with your plan, I'd consider going with crushed rock for your compacted base (you can't really compact sand) and then put a 1" sand layer on ...



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