New answers tagged

1

Yes, you can and should sand latex if you are painting over it. You cannot expect the next coat of paint to grip if it doesn't have a roughed surface to grip to. Painting a glossy or glazed surface is like painting glass - it has no adhesion and will lift right up. Fresh latex is hard to sand because it hasn't cured yet. You have to wait it out. If it ...


0

Both versions of green top mud are for embedding tape, blue top is mainly for finishing. Quick-set mud or hot mud as for filling or repairing. Both green and blue top can also be used for filling but take a lot of time to dry


0

holy macaroni - this is the biggest series of exchanges i have seen over an incredibly simple problem. you need nothing more than a utility knife, a drywall knife and a handsaw 1) just cut vertically through the drywall with a sharp utility knife about 3/4" in from the edge (studs are typically 1 1/2" thick). its easy and will only take you about 5 ...


0

On a hole this small, it wouldn't matter, if you opened it up, all the way to the other side of both 2x4 studs. The sistering solution above is probably the simplest, except for the strip in the middle - as long as your patch is 16" or less, on the loose side - it won't flex. I'd follow along the other side of the stud, with a hole saw, and call it a day - ...


7

I'm a Drywaller of 25 years, the saw blade suggestions are DANGEROUS there are possible screws going up the center of that stud ... do not use a saw blade, the guy who suggested the utility knife had it right, make sure you have a screw gun handy incase you come across a screw.


2

WHile the selected answer is the cleanest way, if you wish to cut back to the existing studs, use the RightToolForTheJob (TM). That is, get yourself a multi-tool oscillator, like this one Genesis . There are better, more expensive ones, but either way this tool will do a hundred different jobs. For your purpose, put the saw blade on and it'll be easy ...


2

I have an abused cordless circular-saw for situations like this, where adding furring isn't an option. The accepted answer tells you how to patch a hole in some drywall where adding furring is an option. It fails to entail how to cut drywall half-off a stud (upvoted however, because as pictured, that's what you do). Draw a line. Set the appropriate depth. ...


25

You want to add backing to the inside sides of the existing studs as well as to the centre of the span. The simplest way to do this is to cut the new backing (preferably 2x4, or whatever the existing stud dimensions are) about 4" longer than the height of the opening and screw them to the existing studs. The cut one more piece of backing to the same length ...


6

Use a utility knife to score through the drywall. It will take several passes to get all the way through. Go slow, be careful, and don't over cut at the ends. Only go 3/4" onto the stud, going an inch or more could cause you to expose the whole stud and weaken the drywall on the opposite side. I do agree that doing this is not enough for that wide of a ...


3

Assuming the hole is the width of a typical stud bay, just attaching the patch on the edges is not a sufficiently strong solution. Screws (or nails) near edges weaken the structural integrity of drywall and the patch is likely to shift and crack eventually. I would attach short pieces to each stud for mounting the sides and 1x3s top and bottom to span the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included