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1

You have a leak - that's what causes moist drywall in virtually all cases. The rust is presumably coming from drywall nails/screws or other nails or steel/iron in the wall. Without fixing the leak first, no repair will last. Once you get the leak fixed you can coat the wall with a "stain-blocking primer" (often shellac based) to stop the rust stains from ...


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If your wiling to change the look of your ceiling, you could tape the seams like you normally would, and skim coat and texture the whole ceiling with a heavy nap roller, then knockdown the peaks with a spackle knife. That would camouflage any inconsistencies in thickness if you did it with some finesse...


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As others have stated, you can basically mud the difference. I'm new to home repairs, but if I'm not mistaken you have to mud anyway right? The seams between the new patch and the old drywall have to be taken care of somehow. You can't really use pre-mixed joint compound , because it's a ceiling and that stuff is too thin; it will fall down on you and I've ...


3

Pro installers will install drywall over irregular framing, which can give the impression of thicker sheets. Drywall can be skimcoated with setting joint compound. This can be as thick as 1/4 inch, in some cases. Originally, the skim was done with plaster In any case, you should fill with a setting compound mixed a bit stiffly and taper out 12 inches ...


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Shim with cardboard to bring your new piece flush. Or use a ton of mud.


1

Just buy a little tub of joint compound, or spackling and cover up the areas. You will have to paint it as well. If it is a hole then get a small piece of drywall slightly bigger than the hole but where you can still get it inside (you may have to cut it bigger). Drill a hole in the middle to fit a piece of string in it. This will help you to hold it to ...


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TL/DR version: It doesn't matter how many of those rails you put into any one sheet of drywall (assuming they are not crazy close together). Those loads won't interact with each other. The problem with drywall is preventing the fastener from pulling out - if your fastener doesn't pull out, then you're going to be fine. Longer: You can ignore the vertical ...


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Make an additional support! Just take a long plank (or whatever You may think of as an aestethically-looking construction item) and attach it to the studs (if You are sure where they are), then - attach Your hangers to the plank/support. Given this You may want to choose whatever You like to look good and it will function well. If You will use correct ...


2

100 pounds is not an impossible load. Heavy mirrors routinely weigh that much and are often mounted in drywall using two anchor points. No question, mounting on studs is much stronger and more reliable. Also, as pointed out by @Steven, dynamic loads are much more challenging than static loads. Repeated strong tugs could weaken an otherwise fine mounting. ...


4

It's hard to say whether your drywall will support this, it might, it might not. Big factors are the thickness, condition, and stud spacing. As well, if the bars ever experience a dynamic load like someone bumping into it, pulling on mugs, etc. it might very well fail while it was fine with a static load. The "right" way to do this is to open up the walls ...



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