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25

You want to add backing to the inside sides of the existing studs as well as to the centre of the span. The simplest way to do this is to cut the new backing (preferably 2x4, or whatever the existing stud dimensions are) about 4" longer than the height of the opening and screw them to the existing studs. The cut one more piece of backing to the same length ...


7

I'm a Drywaller of 25 years, the saw blade suggestions are DANGEROUS there are possible screws going up the center of that stud ... do not use a saw blade, the guy who suggested the utility knife had it right, make sure you have a screw gun handy incase you come across a screw.


6

Use a utility knife to score through the drywall. It will take several passes to get all the way through. Go slow, be careful, and don't over cut at the ends. Only go 3/4" onto the stud, going an inch or more could cause you to expose the whole stud and weaken the drywall on the opposite side. I do agree that doing this is not enough for that wide of a span....


3

Assuming the hole is the width of a typical stud bay, just attaching the patch on the edges is not a sufficiently strong solution. Screws (or nails) near edges weaken the structural integrity of drywall and the patch is likely to shift and crack eventually. I would attach short pieces to each stud for mounting the sides and 1x3s top and bottom to span the ...


3

It looks like one layer of paper has separated from the other. The paper surrounding the tearout has loose flaps of paper around it too. Remove all loose paper and give a tight skim coat or two of paste spackle, sand smooth, prime and paint. You will be wise to get a 4" drywall knife to help in this. The little 1" knife that is considered a putty knife ...


2

On the wall you need to cut out the entire square of drywall out, mud and tape it, sand it, paint it. With fast drying mud and a fan you can do this in 6 hours easy and maybe 30-45 mins of actual work. For a door the only thing you can do is try to Bondo it but it should be replaced. If you are leaving the place they might charge you for the door even ...


2

If it was me, I'd cut away the bad drywall and replace it with 1/2" hardi board. That'll give a flat, solid and waterproof substrate for your tiles, in contrast to the beaten up drywall you've got now. Oh, and be sure to thoroughly caulk the gap between the drywall and the hardi.


2

While the usual trick for super-flat butt joints is to set the gap between studs (see the first answer in Should drywall be hung horizontally or vertically? for an excellent description), it doesn't seem like your situation would work for this. Sadly, the best advice is to get a 10 or 12" taping knife and feather, feather, feather. (I personally wouldn't ...


2

Tape alone; no cutting the paper. Your friend is correct that much of the strength comes from the paper facing. Check out the videos that have you feathering out the joint with a 10 or 12 inch knife.


2

WHile the selected answer is the cleanest way, if you wish to cut back to the existing studs, use the RightToolForTheJob (TM). That is, get yourself a multi-tool oscillator, like this one Genesis . There are better, more expensive ones, but either way this tool will do a hundred different jobs. For your purpose, put the saw blade on and it'll be easy ...


2

I have an abused cordless circular-saw for situations like this, where adding furring isn't an option. The accepted answer tells you how to patch a hole in some drywall where adding furring is an option. It fails to entail how to cut drywall half-off a stud (upvoted however, because as pictured, that's what you do). Draw a line. Set the appropriate depth. ...


1

Your plan seems sound enough. You are right that joint compound and spackle are not the right material for your upper fill. I would not cut down through the wire, but would cut to the depth of the wire in a straight line across, which should leave you a fairly uniform depth. Then use a piece of plasterboard to fill the area up to the corner, fastening your ...


1

Yes, you can and should sand latex if you are painting over it. You cannot expect the next coat of paint to grip if it doesn't have a roughed surface to grip to. Painting a glossy or glazed surface is like painting glass - it has no adhesion and will lift right up. Fresh latex is hard to sand because it hasn't cured yet. You have to wait it out. If it ...


1

If it was indeed just recent & not an ongoing for years situation. Then, let it dry for a week or 2 & see how solid it is then. As long as it feels as solid as before & the rest of the walls, then definitely scrape off what bubbled, split & wrinkled paint you can so there are no lifting or flapping edges. You'll want to fill those new low ...


1

The opening must be sealed in accordance with the listing of the rated ceiling/floor assembly. This will vary among the wide variety assemblies currently and previously listed. Unfortunately, there is no generic correct answer. A correct code compliant solution requires research and expertise atypical among homeowners, or plain dumb luck.


1

It is best not to damage the drywall skin in any way. Even when you are securing the panel with fasteners you should only be dimpling the paper and not puncturing the surface. Drywall tape, fiberglass or paper, is applied to seams because they increase the strength of the joint compound and decreases the chance of the joint splitting or cracking if there is ...


1

As you can easily feel if you play with some drywall scraps, the paper is the strength - so don't cut it unless you are cutting the drywall.


1

If the tape on the wall is fine, one option is to cut the existing tape along the seam between the ceiling and the wall. Remove the half from the ceiling as repair ceiling as needed. Then, to finish, run a bead of caulk along the seam and paint. Tape is always preferred, but I've used caulk for inside corners in lieu of tape many times and (knock on wood)...



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