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4

Since you want to have the drywall piece be 5" high I think you will want to have backer behind it for its full height. Consider making it 5.5" high and then using a piece of 2x6 lumber (that comes 5.5 inches wide) as the backer piece. Cut a couple of pieces to straddle across the bottom of this opening at the back and middle to hold up the shelf the full ...


4

Sounds like you tore off some of the paper on the face of the drywall. This is cosmetic damage and if it wasn't over a seam it doesn't need tape. Scrape the glue (go ahead and damage the wall a little), apply spackle, sand it, (repeat?), paint. Anywhere with crumpled up paper sticking-out (will not sand flat) needs to be bashed in (using the corner on the ...


4

It's hard to say whether your drywall will support this, it might, it might not. Big factors are the thickness, condition, and stud spacing. As well, if the bars ever experience a dynamic load like someone bumping into it, pulling on mugs, etc. it might very well fail while it was fine with a static load. The "right" way to do this is to open up the walls ...


3

Pro installers will install drywall over irregular framing, which can give the impression of thicker sheets. Drywall can be skimcoated with setting joint compound. This can be as thick as 1/4 inch, in some cases. Originally, the skim was done with plaster In any case, you should fill with a setting compound mixed a bit stiffly and taper out 12 inches ...


2

Hopefully there was a notch drilled in the plate, so that when a wire staple is set it will pull the wire in behind the face of the drywall. It should have been cut out large enough to allow a metal plate to cover the wire to protect it, although it is unlikely there will be any nails or screws going into the corner right there, but you never know.... ...


2

While that is a fairly ugly hanging job - I've finished worse. As long as he's not milking you for money, while he works, it might be worth it to stick it out. You're paying for the finished work, not how he makes it there. To answer the question - Yes, it is possible to smooth over those imperfections. The corner will get bead, the outlets will get covers, ...


2

100 pounds is not an impossible load. Heavy mirrors routinely weigh that much and are often mounted in drywall using two anchor points. No question, mounting on studs is much stronger and more reliable. Also, as pointed out by @Steven, dynamic loads are much more challenging than static loads. Repeated strong tugs could weaken an otherwise fine mounting. ...


1

You have a leak - that's what causes moist drywall in virtually all cases. The rust is presumably coming from drywall nails/screws or other nails or steel/iron in the wall. Without fixing the leak first, no repair will last. Once you get the leak fixed you can coat the wall with a "stain-blocking primer" (often shellac based) to stop the rust stains from ...


1

Just buy a little tub of joint compound, or spackling and cover up the areas. You will have to paint it as well. If it is a hole then get a small piece of drywall slightly bigger than the hole but where you can still get it inside (you may have to cut it bigger). Drill a hole in the middle to fit a piece of string in it. This will help you to hold it to ...


1

TL/DR version: It doesn't matter how many of those rails you put into any one sheet of drywall (assuming they are not crazy close together). Those loads won't interact with each other. The problem with drywall is preventing the fastener from pulling out - if your fastener doesn't pull out, then you're going to be fine. Longer: You can ignore the vertical ...


1

Make an additional support! Just take a long plank (or whatever You may think of as an aestethically-looking construction item) and attach it to the studs (if You are sure where they are), then - attach Your hangers to the plank/support. Given this You may want to choose whatever You like to look good and it will function well. If You will use correct ...


1

I'd use mesh tape, overlapped if necessary. Let your first coat set for a while since it'll be thick inside the hole. If it bulges out while drying, just push it back to flat after a couple of hours.


1

I'd doubt that any sort of cover-up will be satisfactory. In fact, a faux finish will likely make the problem more noticeable. I would suggest spreading the plaster out over a much larger area, maybe 3x the size, and sanding and feathering from there with a few passes of progressively finer sandpaper, otherwise your eye will always be drawn to the same spot. ...



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