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25

Correct way to do it as instructed on 'Canada's worst Handyman': cut a piece of strapping (wood) that will be a couple inches longer than the hole on each side. put the strapping inside the hole and attach it using a couple of drywall screws so that it is across the hole. cut a piece of drywall that is the same size as the hole, as close as you can get ...


14

I don't think you'll be happy with spackle for anything bigger across than a nail hole. It's not very strong, and also not very sticky. So what tends to happen in your situation is that the spackle will fall through the hole into the wall; if not when you're applying it then it will be likely to do it when you try to sand it smooth before you paint. I ...


11

There's an alternative to @dilbert789's solution when you're dealing with holes this small: cut a rectangle of drywall about three inches larger than your damaged area in both dimensions. score the back of the drywall one inch in from each edge. break the drywall at the score line, and then remove the drywall from the paper. trace the drywall portion of ...


10

Fix the leak first - this appears to be water damaged, so replacing it without stopping the source of water will be pointless, as the replacement will be water-damaged again. Probably the leak is associated with the window (though it could potentially be coming from anywhere higher, all the way to the roof.) Once the leak is stopped, you cut back to sound ...


9

Setting-type compound (the bagged kind you mix vs. the drying-type you buy premixed in a bucket) will easily fill a 1/2" gap without cracking. Make sure you load up the gap well before applying your tape, then finish it as you would any other joint. Sadly I have a lot of experience filling this type of gap from my own basement project a few years ago...


8

We've done a double layer of drywall to slow the spread of fire in multi-unit developments, specifically between the ceiling and attic space. However, judging by the gap, I'm guessing that you might have this done as a retrofit to block sound. There will be somewhere that the drywall is attached, and it's likely going to be metal tracks running every 16". ...


8

Painting with a roller leaves an "orange peel" type texture that you can't match exactly with a brush. When you brushed your new paint on, the orange peel texture in the unsanded areas just telegraphed through your new brushed paint, but the smoothly sanded parts had no such base texture so they look visibly smoother. To fix this I'd go over your patches ...


6

Is it possible to fix it? yes, but there is an awful lot of work to be done in order to do so. Each of those gaps has to be filled with mud and covered with tape. Given the shrinkage that occurs as mud dries, most of them are going to require several layers to fill properly. In particular, filling in around the ceiling fixture is likely to be problematic ...


5

For something that small the spackle should be fine by itself. You might want to fill the whole with spackle first and let it dry, as some will tend to want to bubble out. Once it is dry sand it down and then put on a second (hopefully final) coat of spackle.


4

Sounds like a bad spot in the drywall, maybe caused by water damage, or physical abuse. You're probably best to keep cutting until you find a good section, though you may get away with simply taping and mudding the joint. The tape should hold the section together, so even if the plaster is crumbling it will be held in place. If you opt to just tape and mud, ...


4

I'm not aware of anything special for fire rating a joint in drywall, just use the same joint compound and tape you would use on the rest of your walls. Fire rated drywall will cut similar to normal drywall, but it will offer a lot more resistance because of the embedded fiberglass. When sealing any gaps or cracks, they make special fire rated expanding ...


4

Yes. The purpose of primer is to seal the raw plaster/gypsum/drywall and create a better surface for finish paint that won't soak it up. As long as the rest of the wall is properly cleaned before painting (paint doesn't bond well to dirt, grease, etc), your finish coat should look even and consistent. For your situation, assuming the existing paint was ...


4

Paper tape you apply mud first then bed the paper tape with mud still wet. Apply a thin layer of mud slightly wider than width of tape Lay tape over seam Scrape the paper tape with a taping knife to bed the tape. A thin layer of mud will cover the tape in the process. Feather the edges of the mud with a wide knife (10" - 12") wait until dry and scrape down ...


4

Four inch and six inch recessed fixtures consist of two main parts - the can and the trim. They need to match. The first issue will be getting the old can out. If it is old-work style, it may be held in just by pressure clips on the sides, fairly easy to remove. If it is new-work style, it will be attached to framing members, either directly or with a brace ...


4

Since you want to have the drywall piece be 5" high I think you will want to have backer behind it for its full height. Consider making it 5.5" high and then using a piece of 2x6 lumber (that comes 5.5 inches wide) as the backer piece. Cut a couple of pieces to straddle across the bottom of this opening at the back and middle to hold up the shelf the full ...


3

The fan may be able to be salvaged, only inspection and testing after it has been dried out can determine this. All the components should be removable from the metal box that is fastened to the ceiling joists. Be sure to turn off power at the breaker before doing any electrical work, though many fans simply unplug from the containing box. Just to be safe. ...


3

I would expect that behind the drywall at the bottom is a 2x4 plate running horizontally that the vertical studs rest on. The bracket should be low enough that you can use a 2 inch screw and anchor to that. You may want to repair the drywall before you put the bracket back. Its hard to tell from the photos if the damage is light enough that you can fill ...


3

Use a drywall repair patch. They are cheap and easy to find at the big box stores. And here's a video on how to do it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvtoikKG318


3

The difference in the texture is because a roller was used originally and then you are painting the patch with a brush. Use a roller on the second coat and you will notice the texture will match exactly. That is one of the reasons why you are told to cut in on the edges with a brush first and then roll out the rest of the wall... because if you do it the ...


3

The paper type drywall tape is attached to the wall with the first thin coat of drywall mud and then covered over with a thin layer of additional wet mud. Some installers may even wet the paper tape before installation. The paper type is a pain to use though in comparison to the modern type of fiber glass screen mesh tape. This type comes with a glue on ...


3

I would need to see pictures of what said bulbs look like in your current cans but I can tell you that they sell thousands of varieties of recessed lighting trim for 6 inch cans. I am almost positive you can find trim that will work for your 4 inch retrofits and you don't have to touch the drywall.


2

Did you paint just one coat over the patches, or two? I've noticed texture differences when I patch something between the first and second coats. Something else you could try is to prime over the patch first, and then paint.


2

They sell dry-wall patches for this purpose.


2

I would probably take the panel down and try again. Even if you used fiberglass mesh tape when you tape the joints, it'll be hard to finish the surface, and you're probably going to experience premature cracking, etc. You could try filling in the gap with one of several materials: foam backing rod (usually used for caulking large gaps) expanding foam ...


2

I'd probably cut a small sliver of drywall and put it in the crack. Have to cut because it would be hard to snap a piece that small.


2

(I am assuming the “spackle” is US for filler.) Have a firm base for filler does help, as you need to be able to push on the filler to get it well into the side of the holes. However as it is not the end of the world if the filler breaks when you try to send it, I would try the easy option first. For larger holes I have built up with layers of filler ...


2

To seal water spotting or other stains on drywall, use a pigmented shellac primer such as BINS Bullseye. One or two coats will completely seal the stains, then repaint with your regular paint. When using shellac primer, be sure to have denatured alcohol available for cleaning your stuff.


2

one to two inches? How thick were the original plaster walls!? A picture would probably help. What I'd suggest is bridge the transition from the coving to the wall with some crown moulding.


2

Fight fire with fire - cut a clean sharp line a distance around the damaged area, then patch. A multi tool like the one below, using a tile or wood cutting attachment (round not square) will allow you to cut a nice, crisp clean line. Much cleaner and with less vibration impact than even using a hand drywall saw in my experience.


2

You can use either all the way through. I have personally used both all the way through more than a few times and have mixed. There are generally some differences. the lightweight end mix is thicker, meaning that the regular can actually be better for a final coat since it goes on thinner the lightweight is easier to sand but I hardly sand... so this ...



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