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Use a non selective herbicide to kill off the weeds, give it time to get to the roots and destroy them too so when you get a power washer, it will clean EVERYTHING out. Dirt that got in there for the weeds to start on has got to go. The roots that are buried in the cracks will decay and turn to dirt too over time, that is why the herbicide has to have time ...


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Knowing that the earth has subsided from underneath the porch (and it's all cracked, anyway), I'd ask for a discount along the lines of what it would cost to bust it up, throw it away and re-pour it. I bet I could sink that porch into the basement with a hammer. Move on to the next house, unless you both want to play the discount game. If you're going to ...


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Well first of all it would be really helpful if we could see the picture. But from what I heard there are two possible scenarios: the patch is flat with the rest of the wall. In this case you should apply 2,3 or maybe even more layers of smoothing primer, and then sand it off with extra fine sand paper; also you can apply last layer or two on the surrounding ...


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It's hard to completely eliminate signs of a patch. Try to get the patch as level with the rest of the wall for starters. You're still going to have some irregularities from the mud but if you feather it out it's less noticeable. Just mud the outside of the patch for now. Do multiple light coats until you get out to a 12" taping knife. That should leave a ...


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Imperfections are hard to see on a white wall. I learned that adding some tint to primer makes the imperfections obvious BEFORE you paint the whole wall, so they can be patched before finish painting. I add a little of the same paint I am going to use to the primer.



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