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25

Correct way to do it as instructed on 'Canada's worst Handyman': cut a piece of strapping (wood) that will be a couple inches longer than the hole on each side. put the strapping inside the hole and attach it using a couple of drywall screws so that it is across the hole. cut a piece of drywall that is the same size as the hole, as close as you can get ...


11

There's an alternative to @dilbert789's solution when you're dealing with holes this small: cut a rectangle of drywall about three inches larger than your damaged area in both dimensions. score the back of the drywall one inch in from each edge. break the drywall at the score line, and then remove the drywall from the paper. trace the drywall portion of ...


10

Patching: When patching smaller holes, a 6" taping knife should suffice. Apply the compound in a few light coats rather than a single heavy coat, and sand between each coat. You can either sand the patch using a sanding block like the 3M® Fine/Medium Large Drywall Sanding Sponge, or wet sand using a slightly damp rag. If you choose to wet sand, let ...


7

Do you have (or can you acquire) any pieces of aluminium or other non ferrous metal at all? If so you could cut small squares that will fit over the holes, screw them over the hole using self tapping screws and seal round the edges of the patch. Painting would give it an extra layer of protection. It might not look particularly pretty, but will do the job ...


6

Can I use an old aluminum road sign as a replacement floor for my hot water heater closet? I'm sorry, but that made me laugh. First thing you should do, is find what is causing the floor to rot and fix the leak. What is "spongy"? The floor or the joist? If the joists are rotten, you need to replace them, then put a new floor down. After you fix ...


6

With one of these: Enamel Repair Kit You simply sand out any rust in the chipped enamel, then paint on a new enamel coating. The finished repair should be permanent, and if well-done nearly undetectable.


5

Stick a piece of wood on it. Either stain to match the wood rising up the stairs or paint it white to match the skirting boards.


4

Using a plug is your best option. Getting an exact match is pretty much impossible. A drill press is the tool of choice for a perfect plug if is conjunction with a good hole saw bit or plug cutting bit. If you can cut the plug from the same stained material in an out of sight location, this would save a lot of time. Color matching is tough to do. Keep in ...


4

You can patch it with hydraulic cement similar to this type You need to carefully remove all loose material and clean the area. The cement is fast setting and expands slightly as it sets, making a tight seal. Only mix as much as you can use in a few minutes.


4

I've found that the easiest solution is to use filler on the holes and plaster work to get a smooth finish and then drill new holes somewhere else. Obviously you haven't got much choice if you're putting up a curtain rail. Another solution might be to screw a wooden board to the wall and then screw the curtain rail to that. You can choose where you fix the ...


4

Coloring powders are available, but be sure to follow the directions exactly if you are targeting a specific shade. These can also be expensive, and tricky to use because because the color appears very different when mixed into wet concrete, compared to the final product. If your porch is bare concrete, I would skip the coloring powders and go right to a ...


4

Get a wide drywall knife and and put on several thin coats of filler. Don't try to put too much on at once. Then sand. Finally apply a primer / sealer that says it's for drywall / wallboard.


3

The process for patching should similar to drywall, but with slightly different materials. I'd suggest using wood filler at the joint. In more detail: first, get a new piece of plywood of the same thickness as the existing wall board. Then you need to attach your patch piece to structure. For this, you have two options. Cut away more of the existing ...


3

If wallpaper was painted over you could tell pretty easily by pulling on some of the peeling paint and breaking the paint chips. Wear a respirator mask while doing this, however, as often times flaking paint is a potential indicator of lead based paint. If the chips contain paper, then you're right, it's wallpaper with paint over it. If it's just paint, ...


3

I don't own a house with plaster so please take this advice with a grain of salt... As you pointed out, the cracks usually appear due to settling. As a result, you ideally want your repair technique to be resilient against future movement. As far as I know, there are 2 main ways of doing this: Method #1: For smaller cracks, fill them in with painter's ...


3

Use a drywall repair patch. They are cheap and easy to find at the big box stores. And here's a video on how to do it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvtoikKG318


2

They sell dry-wall patches for this purpose.


2

I've used drywall compound on plaster in the past with no problems. But it can't be the ready mixed stuff, get the power and mix it yourself (also cheaper). If the house continues to settle/move there is no product out there that will keep the crack from happening again. The trick is to make a slight gouge in the wall with the crack, just putting a bit ...


2

If you only have chips and small holes to fix, the floor patch and leveler will be a sufficient and cheaper. If the holes are minor ( < 1/2" deep and < 1" in diameter), skim coating the area with your thinset and then pulling the notched trowel will safely allow you to bridge with 12x12 tiles.


2

This part of the foundation is most likely spreading out a roof load from a sizable portion of the sunroom roof. If the soil supporting the foundation has eroded away, this will need to be rectified some time next year. For now, get a bag of ready mix mortar, the kind you just add water to, it has sand and cement already mixed in in the correct proportion. ...


1

What you have is a system called EIFS for short. Here is a link to get to the care and repair of this type of finish. Sto Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS) Manuals: StoTherm EIFS Repair and Maintenance Guide


1

Best way is to find some more of the same (or similar) material, clean out or expand the hole to make it easy to patch, cut the new material to match and glue it in. Caulk if necessary and paint to match.


1

I would be more concerned that your wire looks to be at the very bottom of the concrete, making it useless. Concrete is very strong under compression but very weak under flex. The steel is there to take the flex and should be about center of the concrete. Definitely use a concrete bonding agent and Ditra. The Ditra will provide enough of a barrier that the ...


1

You're on the right track. I've repaired chips and missing chunks in 80-100 year old public stairways in similar ways. Start with a hammer and chisel, and be really aggressive like a dentist to find and remove all the soft spots. I've used the tapcon screws, but generally find it easier to chisel an irregular shape that does the same thing. For your ...



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