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I fought with degradation of stain every year. When I painted the entire board, sealed it, I gained an extra year before the moisture compromised it.


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Incompetence. I've never met a roller that I couldn't fix by running it on its edge for a while, and I've never had paint that I couldn't make work right, that wasn't old. One edge of any given roller will be better than the other. You always finish the coat by rolling once more, in the same direction each time (I find down is easiest), slightly ...


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Possibilities: Low grade paint cheap roller or dirty roller, that hold paint in crevices (squirt out as paint is applied) low nap - I always use at least 1/2" painting style - basically not varying your strokes, painting unevenly, and the biggest one is pressing down on the roller because paint is low. Not dipping into the paint bin is the cardinal sin. ...


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A few pointers I would suggest: Use a viscosity cup to measure paint thickness (viscosity) either to keep it consistent, or to change it to get a different thickness. Use a simple comb type tool to measure wet film thickness. Experimentation is not the most important part of science. Standing on the shoulders of giants is. Look at how NASA tests ...


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I believe that this will end up in the wood working SE, but it should be noted that furniture wax is really wax like from a candle; it could be beeswax or petrol (it's not like floor wax which is definitely not wax). Wax is "non-polar". Wax can be cleaned with naptha or paint thinner, which are also non-polar molecules (like dissolves like), but that might ...


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Science used to be considered an art... and I would bet that most scientists today would agree that it really is an art. I think that the best way to make sure it's nearly even is to use the same amount of paint over the same amount of area. In other words, use one cup of paint for each layer... or three cups of paint for one layer. Now most paint covers 600 ...


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This may sound diferent, but you want to save a waxed piece so DONT SAND caps intended! Get a heat gun for stripping paint it will melt the wax and reduce it to the point spirits or acetone will take it off, some times MEK Methyl Eythel Keytone is needed (use out doors with gloves) let the wood dry once the wax is gone. Now you might want do do a very light ...


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The wax has to be removed. It's too slippery for anything to stick to it. Paint thinner will liquefy the wax and you can soak it up with newspapers or paper towels. The shellac primer will then form a barrier to seal the latex paint from getting down into the wood/wax/finish. I like to use it in spray can and put on several light coats.



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