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While not best practice you can prime with latex over the oil prime. For future reference though, do not do it the other way around...it ends poorly.


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When in doubt scuff sand and try again. Its not a for sure fix but it's a zero investment gamble. Just sand it lightly with 220 - 320 (i like these foam backed sanding pads) until the spots disappear (hopefully) then clean thoroughly with a tack cloth or micro-fiber cloth and spray it again. If if works great, if not your not out any thing because you would ...


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Painting is challenging, especially painting old wood windows that are larger than doors. Ha ha ha. But the task you are talking about, you should use a brush. A roller will make your task harder. Buy two brushes, one regular size brush and one small brush (inch wide) for the areas that need edging. Rollers do work well for painting straight flat surfaces, ...


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Answer: yes, if scraping and thorough sanding (coarse, then medium, then fine grit) until smooth does not remove the old paint than feel free to prime and paint right over it. Do not pay attention to those that say "you must test for compatibility with the new paint" or "don't paint it with latex (water-based) paint if it might be old alkyd (oil-based) ...


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Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


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If you shoot the whole thing with primer, then there's little concern about acrylic-over-oil versus oil-over-acrylic. The primer does need to be chemically compatible with the new paint, of course, unless you shoot a layer of shellac before painting (shellac is compatible with nearly everything in the world). Acrylic as a topcoat may last about as long as ...


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The most common cause of cracked paint is moisture. If removing the paint takes wood with it, that suggests water may have gotten into the siding through the cracks and weakened the wood. Lightly tap the siding with a hammer where the cracks appear. It should not leave a noticeable impression; if it does the clapboard is rotting and should be replaced. You ...


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I just love how manufacturers expect that weather be so predictable that one could be assured of no rain in the next 24–48 hours. Here, in the land of the world's most unpredictable weather, we often cross our fingers, resigned to repaint. Or put up tarps to deal with the possibility of rain, or tarps are at the ready in case threatening clouds ...


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Point of order, the term enamel is a tricky one. For the purposes of this conversation, lets just say that enamel is the generic name for any paint that has had an additional hardener added to it. Finishes, outside the automotive world, don't really have enamel per say. Not important just clarifying. You can go through the process of finding out what your ...


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I agree with James. Use paint stripper, and give it a thorough rinsing. The can of stripper will have the instructions on rinsing. After that, then have at it with the sanding. The reason being, the finish will sand differently than the bare wood and the bare wood will lose, dishing it out slightly before the finish is removed. The stripper will allow the ...


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In general, finish coats will not absorb any stain. The finish seals the pores of the wood preventing anything from penetrating. True stain can only be put on wood that does not have a sealer on it. Where you sanded, you removed the sealing finish coat. That let the stain penetrate and darken the wood more than the surrounding areas. The only real fix now ...


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Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...



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