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0

I waited two years. The wood naturally aged, but still took stain just fine. I stained it two more times before I had to strip it and start over.


1

I am a painter and I build also and I personally will not warranty the work unless it's after 6 months. Pressure treated (PT) lumber takes months to shrink and re-contract on and off so the paint will crack and not adhere correctly. Also, the PT you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot gets moved around a lot so you may have a load of wood with boards that are weeks ...


0

first of all when painting bare wood. I would hope you sanded it down a bit first. This will ensure adhesion. I'm a bit confused. You mention that you allowed a day to dry between coats, but now it's still wet? I would say there was either a) too much moisture in the room where the furniture was setting so environment variables may have caused a delay in ...


0

Coming from the Paint Department at Lowe's and serving at two different stores two different paint departments and working with several Valspar reps I can firstly tell you that Valspar does in fact carry Oil-Based paints. They just may not be available at every Lowe's near you. You can definitely do this. There is actually no harm in doing this at all. ...


1

Technically yes as long as it is the same base (assuming your existing valspar paint was latex, you would need another latex paint). The sheen or finish of your paint (flat/satin/semi/gloss) is of no concern and shouldn't provide a problem. However, doing so likely won't do what you want. Assuming your dissatisfaction in texture is more than simply the ...


5

No it is not safe. The plastic bag will most likely make it worse. I have seen just an open pile of rags (not bagged) smoldering in a jobsite waste can at the end of a work day. I removed them and set the pile in the yard just to be safe, it was a pile of ashes in the morning.


7

Normally, latex paint is water soluble while oil paint isn't, so trying to dissolve a drop of paint in water should give you an indication. Don't put water in the paint bucket; if it turns out to be oil base you'll ruin it.


2

Stain never "dries" the way a lacquer or poly finish does. It will cease to be "wet" after awhile, but it will still just come off on your hands and clothing etc. Not a good idea to just leave it on there. Ultimately it is only darker if more of it soaks in. Reapplication after wiping will darken it only slightly, as most of the wood pores are already ...


1

The sanding sponges work great. Elbow grease, however, is not the best approach. Lightly sand and let the sandpaper do the work. It takes time and a ton of passes. If the paint just peels off, you're likely using too much pressure (or the material isn't dry yet). The friction from the sanding tools can heat up, melt the paint, and peel it off making a bigger ...


0

Painting all but the bottom side first is a valid approach. However, I usually hang whatever I'm painting in such a way that I can paint all surfaces at the same time, especially if I need a continuous finish.


0

Paint pealing off is usually a sign that you have layered an oil based paint over a water based paint or primer. A good sign that this has happened is if it peels of in strips. Your paint may also have gone bad before you bought it, if it was not properly stored for instance, it may alternatively have been mixed with the wrong dyes (using an oil based dye ...


-1

No. Sanding with progressively rough to medium to fine sand paper. Wipe down dry to remove all dust before applying polyurethane, paint, etc.


1

I have lots of questions! Is the door installed in place? If so, is there a storm or screen door? Did you paint both inside and outside surfaces? If so: Did you use the same paint on both? Are they both experiencing the same problems? If there is a glass storm/screen door in front of the door, this could lead to problems with paint on the outside ...



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