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For small nicks and holes, put a light coat of primer on first, then you'll see all the indentations a lot better. Then fill in your marks.


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You can get chrome mirror finish vinyl (with a self adhesive backing). To get an effective mirror effect on a wall though, the wall would need to be very smooth, or it would easily show distortion - think a "hall of mirrors" type effect. Signwriter suppliers would be the place to look for it.


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The previous owners of my house did this. Drywall compound will stick very well to wood paneling (please resist the urge to get "creative" with the texture...). Wallpaper, less so, and even if it sticks well, if the wallpaper ever started peeling off, it would take the top part of the wall with it. If you're going down this route, I would highly recommend ...


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Since you can rarely get rid of all rust without sanding completely through the metal, due to pitting, you should remove as much as possible, and the apply a rust fixer.


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This is an answer from yesterday in another question thread: Priming and Painting Galvanized Metal, condensed from KILZ.com, other manufacturers also make specific paints and primers for galvanized metal. The galvanizing process, which is designed to prevent rust, leaves an oily film that can prevent coating adhesion. The zinc in galvanized metal ...


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I've seen a product used that turned the zinc galvanising black, but can't remember what it was called (will update if I remember). Other than that, etch primer - with a thorough degreasing beforehand. Another option to consider would be having the gates powder coated rather than painting them.


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I paint all metal doors with automotive primer (helps with rust and binds harder) and automotive spray paint. Need to spray a good distance away and layer it on lightly but if you take your time it can look almost perfect. Bonus points for following it up with a clear coat a few days later.


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Priming and Painting Galvanized Metal, condensed from KILZ.com, other manufacturers also make specific paints and primers for galvanized metal. The galvanizing process, which is designed to prevent rust, leaves an oily film that can prevent coating adhesion. The zinc in galvanized metal can produce a milky “white rust” (which is common when it has ...


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Wirebrush the rust to remove it. Apply a primer designed to adhere to bare metal. (I'm fond of those which react chemically with rust to help finish the job of preparing the surface, but those are only available in dark colors as far as I know.) Then apply a paint compatible with that primer -- not all paints layer happily on top of each other; generally you ...


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Well, this is thicker than a skim coat, but it's normal. The compound will contract somewhat as it dries. The normal and correct procedure here calls for multiple coats. It is time consuming, but the only way to do it. At any rate, inconsistencies will certainly exist between coats. Its the final coat and finish that is important. If this were ...


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The best non-toxic paint would be silicate mineral paint. Zero VOCs. It basically hardens to rock. The downside is that it needs a mineral-based substrate to adhere properly, like plaster, cementboard, skim-coated drywall, etc. There are some that can be painted on top of bare drywall or previously latex-painted surfaces with the use of a primer. Here are ...


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I'm not sure you'll find a product to seal stains without any VOCs, especially if you want an organic paint. The organic solvents in paint must evaporate to leave the coating on walls. The fact that they evaporate at room temperatures, by definition, means they are volatile, hence Volatile Organic Compound (VOC). The least harmful stain blocker my be a ...


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The nicotine/tar will keep seeping through the walls until the there is nothing left to seep out. Or you can put a stain blocking primer up to seal it in. Both Kilz and Zinsser (big box store) and most of the paint stores have low VOC stain blockers. You will need to prep the walls first, clean with TSP, light sand and wipe down. Once you have the ...


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This really depends on how the old wallpaper was installed, what type it was, if the walls were primed before and so on. Best case scenario (happens 10-15% of the time I have to redo walls) is that your walls were painted/primed, they didn't glob on glue, the glue has broken down due to age and you simply pull off wallpaper and paint. Good case scenario is ...


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If you start with zinser oil (which I use and is great for bathrooms) then I would actually suggest using a latex primer if you will end with a latex paint. I have had issues with latex paint being applied to oil based primers so I would at least do a quick coat with latex primer. If you are going oil paint at the end then no you cannot do this.



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