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Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


2

Once dry, brush marks will not go away without sanding...sorry. Once that is done though: When you paint any given space you should move precisely and quickly. So in this case when you cut out the space in your kitchen (brushing the edges) you should immediately (before the cut work dries) go over it with the roller and get the roller as close to the edge ...


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If you sand and prime over the part that has brush marks, you could try using a pad trim painter. You won't get brush marks, but you may drive yourself crazy trying to make it look good, since the pad won't look the same as the roller on the rest of the wall.


1

Dark colors and metallics do not cover well as they do not have the pigment (titanium dioxide) that blocks out underlying colors . The use of high quality applicators (brushes and rollers) is critical for ensuring a high quality final finish. Buy a good paintbrush that will deliver an even coating application and you should see those brush marks disappear. ...


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You can apply a water-based finish over old alkyd paint as long as it is thoroughly de-glossed and clean. If it is steel, top quality grey or red-oxide metal primer (as Ben suggests) followed by top shelf exterior gloss paint. Contrary to what I often see/hear, using top quality paint and top quality applicators (brushes and rollers) makes a huge difference ...


1

I'm not sure about the clay smell. I think the paint soaked in due to the porosity of the wall. I can't guarantee it will work, but you might check into concrete epoxy, sealer or stain, or try using a primer paint first and do more layers like you said due to the porosity. Epoxy is expensive and might not like the paint.


3

This verges on "opinion based..." Brush width depends what you are working on - for wall corners, 2" is probably fine. On our last project, my assistant finally figured out that using an overly tiny brush on window muntins was slower, not faster or more precise, but for that job a 1/2-5/8" brush was "about right." I go for the long handled angled - how ...


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I would use a setting joint compound (maybe durabond) rather than mud because it's more durable and moisture resistant. It's more time-consuming to sand, however. Either should stick to concrete and both should get a coat of primer before painting. If have old or really glossy concrete, you can prep the surface with a little Muriatic acid to etch the ...


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I would not hesitate to skim over clean dry concrete with drywall mud. As long as the concrete NEVER has a chance to get wet.


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Yes it leaves a very plastic-like finish. They are mainly used in areas that will be sprayed - like a hospital, school, public building. There is nothing wrong with putting this in you home but I offer three pieces of advise. Please test the color after using this on a small sample. And #2 after using this you will have to hit the walls with a heavy ...


2

It may make some cringe, and it is not for the faint of heart, but I would use an extension ladder of the proper height, placed on the stairs so the angle is good for climbing, one of these for either end of the long run of the stair, and place a walk board, a 2X10 or 2X12 (in the US), that is the main work surface. Access to it would be by another item ...


2

There are three ways: 1) Lean a ladder against the lower wall, put boards connecting it with an upper stair, and put a ladder on top of that. 2) Use a baker scaffold. Baker scaffolds can be set up with varying height legs. Then put a ladder on the baker scaffold. This is my recommended solution. 3) Use a 2 wheel edging paint pad that will allow you to ...


1

Advice I've generally heard is that to prevent warping, you should treat the back the same way you treat the front (so they absorb and release moisture in the same ways). If you're going to paint the outside, priming the back seems a Good Idea. (Of course cedar doesn't necessarily need to be painted; cedar shakes have often been allowed to weather to a ...


1

It is definitely better to prime the back of the siding before it is installed. It will keep moisture from being absorbed by the back of the siding, which could lead to warping.


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I put a quarter cup of white vinegar in my stinky paint that smelled like arm pits,and no more smell! Love my vinegar!



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