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6

Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


6

As @Nick2253 commented, sanding between coats promotes better adhesion of the next coat. This occurs because a rougher surface has more area and "features" for the next coat to grab onto. That's why it's easier to scrape paint off of a smooth surface like glass than a relatively rough one like wood. Sanding also helps remove any bumps from dust that's ...


4

How many times is mostly dependent on the quality of the paint and the particular color. You want to do it enough times so that it matches the rolled-on areas. There is no 'one way' to do this, but typically I cut in first, then roll, then touch up as needed. I don't bother with tape. It's much faster, less messy, and (over time) more accurate to get ...


4

I've had mixed results with tape. Paint will wick/bleed under loosely bonded tape, especially if your surface is rough and well-bonded tape can damage the surface especially if you leave it on too long. A friend of mine likes Frog Tape, but I've never tried it. I just free-hand it and switch to decaf coffee for a day! I got good pretty quickly. and it's ...


4

Sure, if you don't mind the texture being the same as the cabinets, there is no technical reason you can't use it, unless the walls currently have latex based paint. Alkyd is an oil based product and may lift a latex based product if used as a top coat.


4

Answer: yes, if scraping and thorough sanding (coarse, then medium, then fine grit) until smooth does not remove the old paint than feel free to prime and paint right over it. Do not pay attention to those that say "you must test for compatibility with the new paint" or "don't paint it with latex (water-based) paint if it might be old alkyd (oil-based) ...


3

There are three ways: 1) Lean a ladder against the lower wall, put boards connecting it with an upper stair, and put a ladder on top of that. 2) Use a baker scaffold. Baker scaffolds can be set up with varying height legs. Then put a ladder on the baker scaffold. This is my recommended solution. 3) Use a 2 wheel edging paint pad that will allow you to ...


3

Use masking tape to isolate the area of the line to be painted. You don't say how wide the line needs to be. Here is a trick for making sure the two pieces are perfectly parallel. What you do is get two kinds of masking, one wide and one narrow. On a long flat surface you lay out your wide tape and secure it to the surface sticky side up with tape or tacks. ...


3

This verges on "opinion based..." Brush width depends what you are working on - for wall corners, 2" is probably fine. On our last project, my assistant finally figured out that using an overly tiny brush on window muntins was slower, not faster or more precise, but for that job a 1/2-5/8" brush was "about right." I go for the long handled angled - how ...


3

Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


3

Priming and Painting Galvanized Metal, condensed from KILZ.com, other manufacturers also make specific paints and primers for galvanized metal. The galvanizing process, which is designed to prevent rust, leaves an oily film that can prevent coating adhesion. The zinc in galvanized metal can produce a milky “white rust” (which is common when it has ...


3

The previous owners of my house did this. Drywall compound will stick very well to wood paneling (please resist the urge to get "creative" with the texture...). Wallpaper, less so, and even if it sticks well, if the wallpaper ever started peeling off, it would take the top part of the wall with it. If you're going down this route, I would highly recommend ...


3

If the walls are in good condition that why would you even have to anticipate sanding? Prepare the surfaces by cleaning them well using a bucket of hot water and TSP (trisodium phosphate) cleaner. Make sure to wear protective rubber gloves. This will get years of dirt and gunk off the walls to make it a good place for new paint to adhere. The TSP will even ...


3

After staining give a coat of clear finish, sanding it with a fine sandpaper (400G) to remove any raised grain or any dust that may have settled onto the drying finish. This will give you a good base to add your paint and the sanded surface will give it good adhesion. Steel wool has its purpose, but I would not use it here. That's only my opinion. My ...


3

Ooh. this problem is one not easily answered without more info: Heat Blisters: Paint bubbles can show up pretty quickly, from within a few hours to a few days after application. The blisters are only in the top coat of paint and appear most often in oil-based paint. A quick rise in temperature, like sunlight shining directly on the newly painted wood, ...


2

Depends on if you want it to look good or not. If you don't care just go to local big box and grab a can of spray paint - I use the rustoleum auto body primer for any metals. Then I go over it will whatever type of spray paint - usually a bronze or satin finish. If you don't sand it you will have rust bubbles in your paint and unless you use an obnoxious ...


2

I called up Rustoleum to ask about their EpoxyShield product since that's what was used previously. They informed me that the epoxy coating needs to be reapplied every 3-5 years (which is about how old the current coating is.) Recommendation was to scuff sand existing epoxy coating with 60 grit sand paper over the entire surface to aid with adhesion, ...


2

If you are only trying to create a single straight line to divide the wall from the ceiling, here is a simple method you could try. Draw a chalk line very tightly from one end of the wall to the other. Snap a line, then apply a good quality bleed resistant painters tape along the chalk line. Do not cover the chalk line with the tape, rather apply the tape ...


2

One thing I read awhile ago and have applied with good results may be applicable here. This answer is more about where you put the line instead of how to get it straight. For getting it straight you may be able to just eyeball it and where you put the line may make it more noticeable. Maybe even use a combination square to make sure the tape is square to ...


2

Altering the dry time (shorter or longer) is something I would generally not advise. As the water evaporates the paint cures. Altering the dry time interferes with this process. This can lead to bubbling, cracking or even the tint separating from the base. Now, are you going to run into problems for sure? Probably not, and if it works for you by all ...


2

It may make some cringe, and it is not for the faint of heart, but I would use an extension ladder of the proper height, placed on the stairs so the angle is good for climbing, one of these for either end of the long run of the stair, and place a walk board, a 2X10 or 2X12 (in the US), that is the main work surface. Access to it would be by another item ...


2

Outdoor carpet ~$6 a square yard. Most people think of the good ol' green stuff, but there are many styles to choose from nowadays.


2

Once dry, brush marks will not go away without sanding...sorry. Once that is done though: When you paint any given space you should move precisely and quickly. So in this case when you cut out the space in your kitchen (brushing the edges) you should immediately (before the cut work dries) go over it with the roller and get the roller as close to the edge ...


2

This really depends on how the old wallpaper was installed, what type it was, if the walls were primed before and so on. Best case scenario (happens 10-15% of the time I have to redo walls) is that your walls were painted/primed, they didn't glob on glue, the glue has broken down due to age and you simply pull off wallpaper and paint. Good case scenario is ...


2

I'm not sure you'll find a product to seal stains without any VOCs, especially if you want an organic paint. The organic solvents in paint must evaporate to leave the coating on walls. The fact that they evaporate at room temperatures, by definition, means they are volatile, hence Volatile Organic Compound (VOC). The least harmful stain blocker my be a ...


2

Wirebrush the rust to remove it. Apply a primer designed to adhere to bare metal. (I'm fond of those which react chemically with rust to help finish the job of preparing the surface, but those are only available in dark colors as far as I know.) Then apply a paint compatible with that primer -- not all paints layer happily on top of each other; generally you ...


2

I don't know your location, but in most residential jobs I've worked on the US east coast the wall finish is flat latex for walls, semi-gloss latex for doors, trims, baseboards, etc.


2

I've found it often depends on the quality of the dwelling. Most apartments I've lived in have flat paint through and through, since it's generally the cheapest and covers up poor mudding jobs because it doesn't reflect light. When I upgraded to a house, most of the living areas were still flat paint, but the bathrooms were finished in eggshell. The rule of ...


2

Sprayers are capable of giving a very smooth finish very quickly. That is why you will often see professionals use sprayers when finishing trim, stairs and cabinets. The negatives of a sprayer would be the amount of prep time required to start painting. You have to tape and plastic EVERYTHING. Do not underestimate the amount of over and back spray you will ...


2

Yes, you can paint plasterboard directly - it's usually just paper on the outside. (Moisture resisting plasterboard tends to have a foil on on side though, which probably won't take paint well). What paint you use will depend what finish (or colours) you want, but you're unlikely to have problems using either emulsion or undercoat and gloss (or matt or ...



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