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9

Getting rid of this texture will be a lot of work. I would recommend that you leave it there unless you absolutely must get rid of it. The ceiling appears to be painted, which means that the texture cannot simply be sanded off. I actually have a similar texture applied to some of the walls in my home. The only way to eliminate it besides either tearing down ...


8

Getting rid of the texture can be a lot of work, especially a type like this that has most likely been painted over. Many times the easiest method to get a new ceiling look of your choosing is to apply a layer of 1/4" drywall over the existing surface. This goes up relatively fast and can have joint taping applied to get to a smooth starting place. You can ...


7

You can't just hang drywall right on top of this - I have tried. If you do the drywall will be wavy. Also that leads to issues with ceiling heights, fans, outlets, and lights. That is just a big mess. The easiest way to do this is boil some water and vinegar, get an aluminum paint tray, dump water, and roll the hot water mixture on ceiling. Then scrape ...


6

MDF is essentially a sponge when it comes to painting it. So the first thing you need to do is prime it properly so that it doesn't absorb the paint. To prime it properly, use a non-water-based primer. These are known as solvent-based primers, or, more commonly called "oil-based" primer. If you use a water-based primer, you end up with the sponge problem......


6

I'd rent a batch of scaffolding (or "staging"), including some extensions to accommodate the berm. You can set up two or three sections and have 20 feet or more to work from at a stretch. It should be relatively inexpensive and you'll be able to keep it for a few days for the same money as a motorized lift. The drawback is that it's a bit slow and effort-...


5

Use a roller to get the most Paint onto the door, only for 1/3rd of the door at a time & immediately Tip or Lay that area off. Tipping or Laying off is using a Paint Brush in the direction of the wood grain or simulated wood grain. Meaning, you even get the meeting joints perfect as well. You never want to just roller a door or trimwork, it looks ...


4

Many red flags. For one, that's not the right way to insulate a ceiling: if you want to use batts, you need to put rigid foam above the roof decking or leave ventilation channels between the roof decking and the insulation. For more info see http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/how-build-insulated-cathedral-ceiling Furthermore, the fire ...


4

I'd argue it's not worth taping in the first place. Learn to 'cut in' with a brush and you'll save yourself all sorts of headaches in the future. As for the advice, I have a hunch they don't mean literally tear off 1' sections of tapes, but apply it as-you-go foot by foot. Meaning, expose a foot of tape, rub it down good, expose more tape, rub that section ...


4

This looks very like Artex to me, it's a common finish in older British houses. It was popular in the 70s. It looks like you have a relatively light dose of it, I have seen worse. It is unfortunately quite hardwearing. The best bet is to skim over it. Brush on 3 coats of 50% PVC to provide a key for the plaster, then skim over the top. You may wish to hire ...


4

A note of caution. This finish may possibly contain asbestos, don't think about sanding it if you aren't 100% sure it doesn't. If it is safe to abrade then one trick I've seen used is to just "shave" the high spots with a long handled scraper, then plaster over the remainder to smooth it out. It worked very well.


4

Depends on size. For significant blems, I'd try wood putty, handling it as if it were joint compound. If that didn't work, I might just give up and actually use joint compound... However, remember that for small nichs and scratches paint itself can fill small irregularities, especially if you scuff-sand between coats or otherwise actively level the surface.


4

Unless you have some particular reason related to plasti-dip's peel-ability to choose that, just hit it with some black paint, and be careful not to scrape it when moving it (indeed, hit it with some black paint, and then you might want to cover the paint with paper for damage protection before moving it, after you check that the paint job is perfect.) I'd ...


4

I used eye-bolts to anchor my ladder to my wall. random intertube photo - I just used rope and carabiners etc If I needed more security I would probably buy ladder-stabilisers or lash a plank to the bottom (less likely for ladder to rotate) and maybe buy a harness to clip myself to the ladder. random intertube photo For soft or uneven ground I once ...


4

My general rule is that paint should generally be one of the last things that you do. Refinishing a floor can make a horrible mess, and dust from sanding is going to end up all over the place. It's probably going to be easier to clean up from the floor job before prepping the walls and ceiling for painting than it would be to clean up freshly painted walls. ...


4

There's paint on sale in the UK that dries white but goes on pink. The big brand version is called Dulux magic. I haven't tried it because even painting white on white, the wet has a different sheen to the dry. Combined with being methodical this is enough. There are also cheaper brands.


3

Flush the sprayer with the appropriate solvent for the material you were spraying -- water for water-borne finishes, paint thinner for oils, alcohol for shellac, .... Yes, clean the gun as soon as you're done with it for at least a few hours, to avoid clogging. You may be able to just cap the finish cup and set it aside for later.


3

This is not a DIY job. Mold can spread everywhere in a wood-framed house full of drywall. Call in the pros to estimate the source and extent of the infection. Simply killing the mold won't help if you don't find the moisture source that made it moldy in the first place. PSA to the world: stop building houses out of wood and drywall. Sheesh, what awful ...


3

There are just too many components to give you a definitive answer. Atlanta doesn't have extremely harsh conditions, so if your house had perfect surroundings the paint could last 50-100 years. Here are some factors: How well was the house painted. You ask if you should do a second coat. Yes. Basically if you have any paint "holes" were the first coat ...


3

Hi if your using an airless sprayer you can expect about 45 percent of your coating to actually hit the target. Jim is right if your in the building there is going to be tremendous overspray and will create a real headache. For an estimate of how much coating if you are going to spray you can check out this article which has a calculator to determine how ...


3

I have been in this position before. Tall ladders make me nervous, no matter how closely I follow the ladder safety setup guide. I also have a tall house in the middle of nowhere (rural area) that needs maintenance. Thus if I fall and get hurt it might be awhile before somebody could call 911 for me. I am a cheapskate, and didn't want to pay money for ...


3

Possibilities: Low grade paint cheap roller or dirty roller, that hold paint in crevices (squirt out as paint is applied) low nap - I always use at least 1/2" painting style - basically not varying your strokes, painting unevenly, and the biggest one is pressing down on the roller because paint is low. Not dipping into the paint bin is the cardinal sin. ...


2

All kinds of designers paint require the experience and skill of a professional artist or painter to achieve a faux finish. One unfamiliar with such finishes could waste gallons of paint, tons of nerves and never even get close to the way it's supposed to look. Adding color to the primer would be helpful, but learning real faux painting techniques; even ...


2

Here in Norway the local 'wisdom' is to install the pressure treated timber one season and stain it the next. As a builder I agree with some of the above comments that the timber can take a considerable time to dry out. However, a few weeks of good weather should get it dry enough to take a finish, but I'd use a moisture metre and check the (finish) ...


2

Seems very unlikely. Consider that lots of harmful industrial chemicals are used in the production of electronics to begin with. Usually most people's concerns with VOC's associated with painting have to do with human health, especially the young and old. It's generally best to minimize any contact with these by ensuring lots of ventation and if possible, ...


2

Depending on the paint you bought, you may be able to add lime which is a mold inhibitor due to its pH. If you can still return the paint, making your own milk paint (aka casein paint) at home is an option. Milk paint has the property of being a natural mold inhibitor if done correctly. Numerous recipes (and youtube videos) can be found online with a quick ...


2

You should be able to test the paint for lead content using one of the lead-test kits you can pick up at Home Depot or Walmart. Especially if the oil-based sub-layer is exposed in places. If the first test proves negative it's worth scuffing the paint with some sandpaper and testing again, just to be sure. If it's lead-free you're home free. Depending on ...


2

That type of textured ceiling seems to have been very popular with every house I've owned. The easiest (not that it's easy) way I've found to remove it is to wet it down using a garden sprayer (with just water) and scrape it off with a stiff drywall knife.


2

By streaking in satin paint I assume you mean flashing. Flashing is when you can see differences in sheen at certain light angles that looks like you just went over some areas with wet paint and other parts look dryer. It's more noticeable with higher sheen paints and oblique lighting like you might find from a nearby window on an adjacent wall. Does that ...


2

I've always had very good results when using polyurethane finish on MDF - particularly on edges, where it is absorbed deeply. I have used it to harden the edges and make them more robust. I'd suggest using it for your purpose also - once dry, I would think the edge would be sandable to a very smooth finish. If paint adhesion is an issue, then I suspect ...


2

Fix the underlying problem before. There is a reason why you still have mold. I would personally rip that wallpaper and locate the source of humidity/water causing this mold. If the water infiltration was fixed correctly, there shouldn't be any mold unless the affected area wasn't let to dry before sealing the area. In order to properly clean mold, you'll ...



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