Hot answers tagged

9

When I did my house, I used a sprayer. But everything was getting ripped out, floors, doors, trim and light fixtures. Masking was simple because of this and being able to do the entire house in about 8 hours of work over two days paid for the extra paint and sprayer. This was a coat of primer and 1 to 2 coats of paint. The 3 rooms I didn't spray was the ...


9

Pro: Quick TO PAINT. ONLY. Con: you have to mask everything, but EVERYTHING, you don't want covered in paint. Floors, windows, toilets, sinks, outlets, switches, lights, the works. Con: not good if you want more than one color, or yet more masking needed. Apartment complexes that paint everything white and replace the carpets (and nearly everything is ...


9

Getting rid of this texture will be a lot of work. I would recommend that you leave it there unless you absolutely must get rid of it. The ceiling appears to be painted, which means that the texture cannot simply be sanded off. I actually have a similar texture applied to some of the walls in my home. The only way to eliminate it besides either tearing down ...


8

Getting rid of the texture can be a lot of work, especially a type like this that has most likely been painted over. Many times the easiest method to get a new ceiling look of your choosing is to apply a layer of 1/4" drywall over the existing surface. This goes up relatively fast and can have joint taping applied to get to a smooth starting place. You can ...


7

Normally, latex paint is water soluble while oil paint isn't, so trying to dissolve a drop of paint in water should give you an indication. Don't put water in the paint bucket; if it turns out to be oil base you'll ruin it.


7

You can't just hang drywall right on top of this - I have tried. If you do the drywall will be wavy. Also that leads to issues with ceiling heights, fans, outlets, and lights. That is just a big mess. The easiest way to do this is boil some water and vinegar, get an aluminum paint tray, dump water, and roll the hot water mixture on ceiling. Then scrape ...


6

MDF is essentially a sponge when it comes to painting it. So the first thing you need to do is prime it properly so that it doesn't absorb the paint. To prime it properly, use a non-water-based primer. These are known as solvent-based primers, or, more commonly called "oil-based" primer. If you use a water-based primer, you end up with the sponge ...


5

Ooh. this problem is one not easily answered without more info: Heat Blisters: Paint bubbles can show up pretty quickly, from within a few hours to a few days after application. The blisters are only in the top coat of paint and appear most often in oil-based paint. A quick rise in temperature, like sunlight shining directly on the newly painted wood, ...


5

No it is not safe. The plastic bag will most likely make it worse. I have seen just an open pile of rags (not bagged) smoldering in a jobsite waste can at the end of a work day. I removed them and set the pile in the yard just to be safe, it was a pile of ashes in the morning.


4

If you want the boards to look brand spanking new again, you will want to go with method one. I'd use a heat gun to do it, and not the harsh chemical strippers. Either method takes about as long as the other and the heat gun method is less toxic, and, you either already have a heat gun and don't need to spend money, or you'll buy one and have it for a long ...


4

Try not to go too cheap - if you do this right you may save a lot on not having to sort out dehumidification off-grid, as I assume this is the same building, and if you fix the walls getting wet you won't need that, or at least not nearly as much of it. What dehumidification options don't require a lot of electricity? Unless you have a great desire to ...


4

I'd argue it's not worth taping in the first place. Learn to 'cut in' with a brush and you'll save yourself all sorts of headaches in the future. As for the advice, I have a hunch they don't mean literally tear off 1' sections of tapes, but apply it as-you-go foot by foot. Meaning, expose a foot of tape, rub it down good, expose more tape, rub that section ...


4

Many red flags. For one, that's not the right way to insulate a ceiling: if you want to use batts, you need to put rigid foam above the roof decking or leave ventilation channels between the roof decking and the insulation. For more info see http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/how-build-insulated-cathedral-ceiling Furthermore, the fire ...


4

This looks very like Artex to me, it's a common finish in older British houses. It was popular in the 70s. It looks like you have a relatively light dose of it, I have seen worse. It is unfortunately quite hardwearing. The best bet is to skim over it. Brush on 3 coats of 50% PVC to provide a key for the plaster, then skim over the top. You may wish to hire ...


4

A note of caution. This finish may possibly contain asbestos, don't think about sanding it if you aren't 100% sure it doesn't. If it is safe to abrade then one trick I've seen used is to just "shave" the high spots with a long handled scraper, then plaster over the remainder to smooth it out. It worked very well.


4

Depends on size. For significant blems, I'd try wood putty, handling it as if it were joint compound. If that didn't work, I might just give up and actually use joint compound... However, remember that for small nichs and scratches paint itself can fill small irregularities, especially if you scuff-sand between coats or otherwise actively level the surface. ...


4

Unless you have some particular reason related to plasti-dip's peel-ability to choose that, just hit it with some black paint, and be careful not to scrape it when moving it (indeed, hit it with some black paint, and then you might want to cover the paint with paper for damage protection before moving it, after you check that the paint job is perfect.) I'd ...


3

There are just too many components to give you a definitive answer. Atlanta doesn't have extremely harsh conditions, so if your house had perfect surroundings the paint could last 50-100 years. Here are some factors: How well was the house painted. You ask if you should do a second coat. Yes. Basically if you have any paint "holes" were the first coat ...


3

This is not a DIY job. Mold can spread everywhere in a wood-framed house full of drywall. Call in the pros to estimate the source and extent of the infection. Simply killing the mold won't help if you don't find the moisture source that made it moldy in the first place. PSA to the world: stop building houses out of wood and drywall. Sheesh, what awful ...


3

Flush the sprayer with the appropriate solvent for the material you were spraying -- water for water-borne finishes, paint thinner for oils, alcohol for shellac, .... Yes, clean the gun as soon as you're done with it for at least a few hours, to avoid clogging. You may be able to just cap the finish cup and set it aside for later.


2

I would strongly suggest the walls are primed and use a mold inhibitor behind the cabinetry, especially behind the sink cabinet and where the dishwasher will set. Raw drywall should be sealed before anything is installed against it in my opinion.


2

The sanding sponges work great. Elbow grease, however, may not be the best approach. If the paint is relatively new than lightly sand the high spot by letting the sandpaper do the work. It may take some time and several passes. The friction from the sanding tools can soften the paint if it is not completely dry. Use a 80-100 grit open coat sand paper to ...


2

I am a painter and I build also and I personally will not warranty the work unless it's after 6 months. Pressure treated (PT) lumber takes months to shrink and re-contract on and off so the paint will crack and not adhere correctly. Also, the PT you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot gets moved around a lot so you may have a load of wood with boards that are weeks ...


2

Well, you could try something like a log home chinking material. These obviously aren't logs and it might be harder to use backing rods in the relatively tight chink joints, but I would still think that you'd want a flexible seal in the joints. You did say the water is coming in through the joints and knot holes, right? It obviously isn't seeping all the ...


2

You can use a natural sponge to make concrete like shadings. Use a light touch and dab the sponge. Turn the sponge often so you don't get a regular pattern. Practice first on some cardboard. You can start with either your darker shade or the lighter, see which you like the best. Go back over what you have done with a dry brush or rag to soften your work ...


2

In general, it's the final layer that determines the amount of gloss in the finish. Adding another layer of matte should do it. However, another layer of stain will deepen the color. I presume from your wording that you are actually using an all in one stain and poly finish (minwax?)... That's the hazard with using those - everything needs the same number ...


2

All kinds of designers paint require the experience and skill of a professional artist or painter to achieve a faux finish. One unfamiliar with such finishes could waste gallons of paint, tons of nerves and never even get close to the way it's supposed to look. Adding color to the primer would be helpful, but learning real faux painting techniques; even ...


2

I'd bet on "poor preparation/paint job" (given that preparation is 90% of a good paint job.) If you wanted to, you could use a high-temperature paint such as engine enamel (typically good to 450F or more) (no need to go for the exhaust-manifold paints unless your doorframe is charring, I think.) I strongly suspect that's not really needed; you could put a ...


2

I agree on using the primer first. However, the combination primer/paint may be overkill. I would plan for 1 coat of primer and two coats of regular paint, as it is tough for the average DIYer to get full coverage with one coat of paint.


2

Stain never "dries" the way a lacquer or poly finish does. It will cease to be "wet" after awhile, but it will still just come off on your hands and clothing etc. Not a good idea to just leave it on there. Ultimately it is only darker if more of it soaks in. Reapplication after wiping will darken it only slightly, as most of the wood pores are already ...



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