Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


6

These types of screws have been used for decades with no rust issue created by the drywall mud. I don't mean to step on any toes, my apologies, but there has never been an issue with mud popping off screw heads in my experience from rust. There is no sign of rust on the screw head, nor rust "bleed" on the drywall. Although I have seen it happen in extreme ...


6

I've tried a bunch of tools for cutting in corners/edges (the worst part of the job, IMO), and always end up going back to using a paintbrush. There's not enough of a texture difference to notice it unless you have your face ON the wall (once it's dry), and it's much easier to deal with. My family helps each other with painting, and my sister has textured ...


6

To elaborate a little more. When you apply a finish like poly or even paint, it doesn't just instantly go from a liquid to a solid after an hour or whatever the dry time is for the product. When it's exposed to air it slowly starts to solidify. As this happens the physical properties of the finish change. Most importantly it's workability changes. If you ...


6

Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


4

The rule of thumb is you can use latex paints over oil primers and latex primers. Do not use oil based paints over any surface currently coated with a latex primer or paint. The oil based paint or primer will usually lift the latex product and leave you with a wrinkled surface that looks like alligator skin.


4

It simply means that the edge of the finished area should not be allowed to dry out, so you're not putting wet polyurethane over dry.


4

Sure, if you don't mind the texture being the same as the cabinets, there is no technical reason you can't use it, unless the walls currently have latex based paint. Alkyd is an oil based product and may lift a latex based product if used as a top coat.


4

I've had mixed results with tape. Paint will wick/bleed under loosely bonded tape, especially if your surface is rough and well-bonded tape can damage the surface especially if you leave it on too long. A friend of mine likes Frog Tape, but I've never tried it. I just free-hand it and switch to decaf coffee for a day! I got good pretty quickly. and it's ...


4

How many times is mostly dependent on the quality of the paint and the particular color. You want to do it enough times so that it matches the rolled-on areas. There is no 'one way' to do this, but typically I cut in first, then roll, then touch up as needed. I don't bother with tape. It's much faster, less messy, and (over time) more accurate to get ...


4

Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


4

Answer: yes, if scraping and thorough sanding (coarse, then medium, then fine grit) until smooth does not remove the old paint than feel free to prime and paint right over it. Do not pay attention to those that say "you must test for compatibility with the new paint" or "don't paint it with latex (water-based) paint if it might be old alkyd (oil-based) ...


4

The previous owners of my house did this. Drywall compound will stick very well to wood paneling (please resist the urge to get "creative" with the texture...). Wallpaper, less so, and even if it sticks well, if the wallpaper ever started peeling off, it would take the top part of the wall with it. If you're going down this route, I would highly recommend ...


3

Definitely read up on the EPA 'renovation repair and painting' rule. Option #3, the 1/4" drywall, is likely to produce the best and cleanest results, at the cost of loss of room space and alteration in the look of all your trim. You'll have to extend all outlets also. Of course that sounds suspiciously like what happened last time. Eventually your room ...


3

That is in fact a "sand finish", your intuition was right. Now depending on the age of the house it could be sand added to the plaster, added to the mud, or a "sand finish" paint. The last is your best hope of matching, as you would drywall it all smooth then simply use brushstrokes to recreate the pattern. There are premixed sand paints amazingly ...


3

Use masking tape to isolate the area of the line to be painted. You don't say how wide the line needs to be. Here is a trick for making sure the two pieces are perfectly parallel. What you do is get two kinds of masking, one wide and one narrow. On a long flat surface you lay out your wide tape and secure it to the surface sticky side up with tape or tacks. ...


3

This verges on "opinion based..." Brush width depends what you are working on - for wall corners, 2" is probably fine. On our last project, my assistant finally figured out that using an overly tiny brush on window muntins was slower, not faster or more precise, but for that job a 1/2-5/8" brush was "about right." I go for the long handled angled - how ...


3

Priming and Painting Galvanized Metal, condensed from KILZ.com, other manufacturers also make specific paints and primers for galvanized metal. The galvanizing process, which is designed to prevent rust, leaves an oily film that can prevent coating adhesion. The zinc in galvanized metal can produce a milky “white rust” (which is common when it has ...


2

You will need: Carbide scrapers of different sizes Paint spray gun (will save you TONS of time) Several good quality brushes -- edging and flat shapes Wood hardener for any isolated rotted spots of wood Wood filler or bondo to spot-patch rotted areas Extra replacement siding Saw(s) -- circular, oscillating multitool, etc Hammer, nails (galvanized) Aluminum ...


2

I painted my kitchen with Aura paint -- a warm gray color which completely covered the "pottery red" color that had been there for years. So --no primer and only one coat. It couldn't have been easier. The one thing to be careful of is that occasionally there is a danger of a "piece" of the paint wanting to slide off the wall -- sort of like a drip but ...


2

It is always a good idea to sand before painting, though that is one way to do the prep work. De-glossers will prepare the surface too, although I have no experience in this type of prep. The name brand cleaner will not dull the surface, but it will help in the surface prep. If there is soot present, this is good to remove that, then sand or de-gloss. If ...


2

I think you missed a really important step in the process. Anytime I have to remove paper from walls that were not treated with a release sizing before the paper was applied, the drywall paper is usually damaged or lots of glue residue is left behind. I have found that a skim coat of drywall compound needs be be applied, sanded and sealed with PVA primer ...


2

Typically, as with new drywall, the drywall is primed before applying texture. Priming allows for even, proper drying of the texture. Shellac would do the same thing. So I would shellac, texture, prime, paint.


2

Could you also explain how the "frame/border/halo" effect happens? This is where the cut-in area is a different shade? Is really because the "cut-in" area had dried before you painted the area? I've seen this happen when someone touches up spots after a wall has been painted completely. I feel it happens because the paint was not properly mixed to begin ...


2

You'll have some waste with spraying. Considerably more than with a brush or roller, anyhow. Find the square footage---both sides---and divide 325 into it. You'll get about that amount, 325 square feet per gallon, if you're careful. You will likely need more than one coat… Also, make sure the surface has been well prepared by removing loose paint and ...


2

Depends on if you want it to look good or not. If you don't care just go to local big box and grab a can of spray paint - I use the rustoleum auto body primer for any metals. Then I go over it will whatever type of spray paint - usually a bronze or satin finish. If you don't sand it you will have rust bubbles in your paint and unless you use an obnoxious ...


2

One thing I read awhile ago and have applied with good results may be applicable here. This answer is more about where you put the line instead of how to get it straight. For getting it straight you may be able to just eyeball it and where you put the line may make it more noticeable. Maybe even use a combination square to make sure the tape is square to ...


2

If you are only trying to create a single straight line to divide the wall from the ceiling, here is a simple method you could try. Draw a chalk line very tightly from one end of the wall to the other. Snap a line, then apply a good quality bleed resistant painters tape along the chalk line. Do not cover the chalk line with the tape, rather apply the tape ...


2

I called up Rustoleum to ask about their EpoxyShield product since that's what was used previously. They informed me that the epoxy coating needs to be reapplied every 3-5 years (which is about how old the current coating is.) Recommendation was to scuff sand existing epoxy coating with 60 grit sand paper over the entire surface to aid with adhesion, ...


2

Altering the dry time (shorter or longer) is something I would generally not advise. As the water evaporates the paint cures. Altering the dry time interferes with this process. This can lead to bubbling, cracking or even the tint separating from the base. Now, are you going to run into problems for sure? Probably not, and if it works for you by all ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible