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7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


6

Call your utility company and have the power shut off at the pole for the duration of your work in that area.


6

I've tried a bunch of tools for cutting in corners/edges (the worst part of the job, IMO), and always end up going back to using a paintbrush. There's not enough of a texture difference to notice it unless you have your face ON the wall (once it's dry), and it's much easier to deal with. My family helps each other with painting, and my sister has textured ...


6

These types of screws have been used for decades with no rust issue created by the drywall mud. I don't mean to step on any toes, my apologies, but there has never been an issue with mud popping off screw heads in my experience from rust. There is no sign of rust on the screw head, nor rust "bleed" on the drywall. Although I have seen it happen in extreme ...


6

To elaborate a little more. When you apply a finish like poly or even paint, it doesn't just instantly go from a liquid to a solid after an hour or whatever the dry time is for the product. When it's exposed to air it slowly starts to solidify. As this happens the physical properties of the finish change. Most importantly it's workability changes. If you ...


5

You need to remove flaking and loose paint or else it will eventually chip off and be a hazard in itself. One approach is to avoid sanding and do a moderate scraping with a carbide paint scraper. This will generate some flakes which can be much more easily contained than dust from sanding. Vacuum with a shop vac and wear a mask. Then prime and paint ...


5

In my experience in painting my own house over 50 years I only sand when necessary, that is when the paint is loose, or, the surface is glossy. I just repainted some trim on my house that has Semi-Gloss paint. And, I sanded it first. I did this to improve the adhesion of the new paint. But, most of my house has flat paint, and I never sand it unless I'm ...


4

If you select boards with knots, there is a good chance that they will bleed through, even if you use a sealer or shellac based primer. The resins in knots is persistent. Clear boards are usually used for moldings, including baseboards. You could also use MDF (medium density fiberboard) or solid vinyl composite molding. When painted, they are hard to ...


4

If the present paint on the doors is indeed sticking very well and the surface finish is conducive to overcoating then I would recommend a process to fill in the peeled out areas with a spackle or drywall mud. Apply one of these materials with a putty knife, let it dry and then lightly sand to get a smooth even surface. Sometimes it is necessary to apply a ...


4

Ummm. Primer might be the least of your concerns. I have flipped a few houses in my life and many have had heavy smokers and/or animals. If you remove all soft surfaces - carpet, curtains, anything that can retain the smoke smell - then you can try to prime it if the odor isn't insane. So after everything is out let it air out a day or two or longer. ...


4

Latex paints have a known attribute that allows certain things to persistently come through the paint even though you try applying multiple layers. I once had a problem of a wall that had a poster glued to it by a previous owner. I removed the poster and apparently the glue residue, however small it was, kept changing the paint I applied over that area. ...


4

The rule of thumb is you can use latex paints over oil primers and latex primers. Do not use oil based paints over any surface currently coated with a latex primer or paint. The oil based paint or primer will usually lift the latex product and leave you with a wrinkled surface that looks like alligator skin.


4

It simply means that the edge of the finished area should not be allowed to dry out, so you're not putting wet polyurethane over dry.


4

Sure, if you don't mind the texture being the same as the cabinets, there is no technical reason you can't use it, unless the walls currently have latex based paint. Alkyd is an oil based product and may lift a latex based product if used as a top coat.


4

I've had mixed results with tape. Paint will wick/bleed under loosely bonded tape, especially if your surface is rough and well-bonded tape can damage the surface especially if you leave it on too long. A friend of mine likes Frog Tape, but I've never tried it. I just free-hand it and switch to decaf coffee for a day! I got good pretty quickly. and it's ...


4

How many times is mostly dependent on the quality of the paint and the particular color. You want to do it enough times so that it matches the rolled-on areas. There is no 'one way' to do this, but typically I cut in first, then roll, then touch up as needed. I don't bother with tape. It's much faster, less messy, and (over time) more accurate to get ...


3

That is in fact a "sand finish", your intuition was right. Now depending on the age of the house it could be sand added to the plaster, added to the mud, or a "sand finish" paint. The last is your best hope of matching, as you would drywall it all smooth then simply use brushstrokes to recreate the pattern. There are premixed sand paints amazingly ...


3

Whatever generates the least dust. Hand wash (least dust) Hand scraping Hand sanding (wet if possible) Power sanding (most dust) (should be connected to HEPA vac Murphy oil soap (trademark for soap recommended for wood) on the dirty sections. Prime with the best, most tenacious primer. Pros must follow the EPAs RRP rules: mask off work areas, put ...


3

I've never heard of scraping paint that is well adhered. Loose and almost-loose paint ought to be removed one way or another down to a layer that is well adhered, or to the substrate. The cause of peeling paint ought to be determined and remedied before repainting. The remaining good paint ought to be cleaned first, then toothed with either TSP or sand ...


3

Definitely read up on the EPA 'renovation repair and painting' rule. Option #3, the 1/4" drywall, is likely to produce the best and cleanest results, at the cost of loss of room space and alteration in the look of all your trim. You'll have to extend all outlets also. Of course that sounds suspiciously like what happened last time. Eventually your room ...


3

Use masking tape to isolate the area of the line to be painted. You don't say how wide the line needs to be. Here is a trick for making sure the two pieces are perfectly parallel. What you do is get two kinds of masking, one wide and one narrow. On a long flat surface you lay out your wide tape and secure it to the surface sticky side up with tape or tacks. ...


3

This verges on "opinion based..." Brush width depends what you are working on - for wall corners, 2" is probably fine. On our last project, my assistant finally figured out that using an overly tiny brush on window muntins was slower, not faster or more precise, but for that job a 1/2-5/8" brush was "about right." I go for the long handled angled - how ...


2

I painted my kitchen with Aura paint -- a warm gray color which completely covered the "pottery red" color that had been there for years. So --no primer and only one coat. It couldn't have been easier. The one thing to be careful of is that occasionally there is a danger of a "piece" of the paint wanting to slide off the wall -- sort of like a drip but ...


2

It sounds like the dampness is still a problem in that particular area because it is a corner adjoining the external wall and the store area. Is this part of the house in shadow for a lot of the day? Check the external ground area surrounding the outside store. If the ground is clay or compacted it might not be helping in that it is storing water. ...


2

Lungs weren't made to filter out latex aerosols, organic solvents, urethane, epoxy fumes. Any time you're spray painting, you should at least have a dust filter. Coughing up paint may be something you put up with in an unregulated factory, but given that masks that do the job aren't really that expensive anymore, your lung capacity will be a lot better when ...


2

If the current walls are textured with an orange peel texture, then, yes, go ahead and use the 'texture in a can' to replicate. Every wall in our house is orange peel (blech) so when I created an interior bump out with new sheetrock, I caved in and sprayed to match. I was pleasantly surprised to find the texture-in-a-can is rather easy to apply and seems ...


2

It sounds like you have a mud swirl pattern on your ceiling. These can be difficult to match an existing pattern to a repair. Practice matching the pattern on scrap pieces of drywall by changing the consistency of the mix (thicker or looser) as well as how the mix applied until the pattern is replicated. Practice will enable a good match when it comes ...


2

You will need: Carbide scrapers of different sizes Paint spray gun (will save you TONS of time) Several good quality brushes -- edging and flat shapes Wood hardener for any isolated rotted spots of wood Wood filler or bondo to spot-patch rotted areas Extra replacement siding Saw(s) -- circular, oscillating multitool, etc Hammer, nails (galvanized) Aluminum ...


2

Wash and rinse walls, ceilings. Pigmented shellac. Alcohol based. You will need organic respirators if you spray it ( and turning off pilot lights during spray). Its what fire cleanup pros use.


2

You'll have some waste with spraying. Considerably more than with a brush or roller, anyhow. Find the square footage---both sides---and divide 325 into it. You'll get about that amount, 325 square feet per gallon, if you're careful. You will likely need more than one coat… Also, make sure the surface has been well prepared by removing loose paint and ...



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