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6

It can be a problem when drying conditions are too fast for the finish to release the bubbles. Here are some strategies to try. Good quality brush, china bristle (boar) for oil Slight thinning (up to 10%). Drying extenders (retarders): Floetrol for latex, Penetrol for oil based paints and stains Don't shake your finish, stir only (to prevent mixing ...


6

I've tried a bunch of tools for cutting in corners/edges (the worst part of the job, IMO), and always end up going back to using a paintbrush. There's not enough of a texture difference to notice it unless you have your face ON the wall (once it's dry), and it's much easier to deal with. My family helps each other with painting, and my sister has textured ...


6

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


6

To elaborate a little more. When you apply a finish like poly or even paint, it doesn't just instantly go from a liquid to a solid after an hour or whatever the dry time is for the product. When it's exposed to air it slowly starts to solidify. As this happens the physical properties of the finish change. Most importantly it's workability changes. If you ...


5

Wax the back edges with a candle. Tighten only as much as necessary. In the future, if a cover plate does not fall off after removing the screws, use a knife to score around it's perimeter. Scoring will go a long ways in preventing visible/exposed paint from being pulled off with the plate.


5

You need to remove flaking and loose paint or else it will eventually chip off and be a hazard in itself. One approach is to avoid sanding and do a moderate scraping with a carbide paint scraper. This will generate some flakes which can be much more easily contained than dust from sanding. Vacuum with a shop vac and wear a mask. Then prime and paint ...


5

These types of screws have been used for decades with no rust issue created by the drywall mud. I don't mean to step on any toes, my apologies, but there has never been an issue with mud popping off screw heads in my experience from rust. There is no sign of rust on the screw head, nor rust "bleed" on the drywall. Although I have seen it happen in extreme ...


4

I would guess that your issue is that you didn't prime first. From Wikipedia: A primer or undercoat is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. Priming ensures better adhesion of paint to the surface, increases paint durability, and provides additional protection for the material being painted You buy primer from the same store you ...


4

Primers (of either base) can be top coated with either latex or oil. Double check your primer label. What doesn't work is an oil based topcoat (brittle film) over a latex topcoat (softer, flexible film). An oil based primer is a good undercoat for exterior (or baths), due to its greater degree of waterproofing.


4

If you select boards with knots, there is a good chance that they will bleed through, even if you use a sealer or shellac based primer. The resins in knots is persistent. Clear boards are usually used for moldings, including baseboards. You could also use MDF (medium density fiberboard) or solid vinyl composite molding. When painted, they are hard to ...


4

If the present paint on the doors is indeed sticking very well and the surface finish is conducive to overcoating then I would recommend a process to fill in the peeled out areas with a spackle or drywall mud. Apply one of these materials with a putty knife, let it dry and then lightly sand to get a smooth even surface. Sometimes it is necessary to apply a ...


4

Ummm. Primer might be the least of your concerns. I have flipped a few houses in my life and many have had heavy smokers and/or animals. If you remove all soft surfaces - carpet, curtains, anything that can retain the smoke smell - then you can try to prime it if the odor isn't insane. So after everything is out let it air out a day or two or longer. ...


4

In my experience in painting my own house over 50 years I only sand when necessary, that is when the paint is loose, or, the surface is glossy. I just repainted some trim on my house that has Semi-Gloss paint. And, I sanded it first. I did this to improve the adhesion of the new paint. But, most of my house has flat paint, and I never sand it unless I'm ...


4

Latex paints have a known attribute that allows certain things to persistently come through the paint even though you try applying multiple layers. I once had a problem of a wall that had a poster glued to it by a previous owner. I removed the poster and apparently the glue residue, however small it was, kept changing the paint I applied over that area. ...


4

The rule of thumb is you can use latex paints over oil primers and latex primers. Do not use oil based paints over any surface currently coated with a latex primer or paint. The oil based paint or primer will usually lift the latex product and leave you with a wrinkled surface that looks like alligator skin.


3

You absolutely want to use a brush for most exterior surfaces, and definitely the siding and trim. The only time to ever use a roller is on a large flat surface (think drywall, or plywood paneling) -- in the image you provided I might use a roller for the white soffit, but that's it and only if it's a large house. Aside from avoiding unsightly "orange ...


3

Take a paint chip from a hidden location to the store, they will match it for you. It's a fairly common practice. Just realize that paint fades, so even a perfect match to your chip may not be a perfect match to the entire wall. It's best to paint at least up to a corner, if not the entire room. If that's not possible, then practice blending your patch into ...


3

The foul smell is from the volatile organic compounds in the paint decaying. Could very well have mold spores living in it. Whatever you are smelling its going straight into your lungs because smells are particular. If it was me I would get rid of it like it was a plague. My suggestion is get a heavy duty respirator with the proper filters and a boat load of ...


3

It depends on thickness, temperature and humidity. Most of the time, overnight is sufficient. Latex primers are more forgiving of any subsurface moisture. I have a moisture content meter I use after water damage repairs. Interior MC should be under 15%, exterior under 25%. You would want a full dry before sealing with a shellac or oil based primer. ...


3

If you don't want to strip the new paint off, you can sand it to smooth out the rough areas. Go over it with a 150 grit first, then go over it a second time with 220 or 340. You can use a sanding sponge to get into the tight details. Be sure to clean it well after sanding, completely dust free this time. If possible, pull the hinge pins and remove the ...


3

For getting paint off a door, I highly recommend using Citrus Strip. We tried it on our old wooden door and it worked great, taking off multiple layers of paint. It doesn't work as well under a lot of sun and heat, so I would recommend either taking the door off the hinges or erecting some sort of tarp to block the sun from hitting it directly. Then get a ...


3

Whatever generates the least dust. Hand wash (least dust) Hand scraping Hand sanding (wet if possible) Power sanding (most dust) (should be connected to HEPA vac Murphy oil soap (trademark for soap recommended for wood) on the dirty sections. Prime with the best, most tenacious primer. Pros must follow the EPAs RRP rules: mask off work areas, put ...


3

That is in fact a "sand finish", your intuition was right. Now depending on the age of the house it could be sand added to the plaster, added to the mud, or a "sand finish" paint. The last is your best hope of matching, as you would drywall it all smooth then simply use brushstrokes to recreate the pattern. There are premixed sand paints amazingly ...


3

I've never heard of scraping paint that is well adhered. Loose and almost-loose paint ought to be removed one way or another down to a layer that is well adhered, or to the substrate. The cause of peeling paint ought to be determined and remedied before repainting. The remaining good paint ought to be cleaned first, then toothed with either TSP or sand ...


3

Definitely read up on the EPA 'renovation repair and painting' rule. Option #3, the 1/4" drywall, is likely to produce the best and cleanest results, at the cost of loss of room space and alteration in the look of all your trim. You'll have to extend all outlets also. Of course that sounds suspiciously like what happened last time. Eventually your room ...


2

It sounds like the dampness is still a problem in that particular area because it is a corner adjoining the external wall and the store area. Is this part of the house in shadow for a lot of the day? Check the external ground area surrounding the outside store. If the ground is clay or compacted it might not be helping in that it is storing water. ...


2

I painted my kitchen with Aura paint -- a warm gray color which completely covered the "pottery red" color that had been there for years. So --no primer and only one coat. It couldn't have been easier. The one thing to be careful of is that occasionally there is a danger of a "piece" of the paint wanting to slide off the wall -- sort of like a drip but ...


2

I would apply paint to the outside walls and trim surfaces with an air sprayer. Make sure that the walls are fully and properly prepped before applying paint. There can be no better way to get a excellent looking and uniform paint job than spraying. Paint brushing the outside of a house is the old fashioned way of doing it before paint sprayers were ...


2

You didn't say how large the entire top was. Over brush snagging looks terrible, unfortunately. If you really want a smooth consistant finish, don't attempt to just touch up the flaw areas. I would sand the top again, making sure the snags are very smooth, then put a thin coat on the entire top. Dust control is the key to doing furniture. If there is minor ...


2

You can't paint over flaking paint. Doing so only adheres the new pait to the old paint, and since the old paint is flaking, so will your new paint. You need to remove the flaking paint. Scraping is likely best, along with the appropriate safety gear (Lead approved face masks, lead approved filters for the shop vac, etc.) If it's only going to stand for ...



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