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17

Ceiling first, if you're going to do it. Strip the trim: it's a messy job and you will get stripper in places you don't want it. Actually, if you could remove the trim without damaging it, I would do that. Paint the walls. Paint the trim: you'll likely be using a small paintbrush on the trim, so it'll be easier to get sharp lines where it meets the walls. ...


13

Are you using plain brown masking tape, or the slightly more expensive painter's tape? I've had the best luck when I've spent just a little bit more to get better quality tape. It comes off easier, and leaves behind less residue. No matter what kind of tape you use, I also agree with Niall C. Definitely remove the tape as soon as you can after painting. ...


13

Getting a smooth finish without purchasing an expensive HVLP sprayer is fairly easy. Start with any good grade paint, and treat it with Flotrol acrylic additive at a rate of about 1/2 pint per gallon and mix well. If you get a real thick paint, you can increase the amount of Flowtrol up to one pint per gallon max. I use and recommend Purdy brushes. For ...


13

Painting hinges is not a question of being better or worse. Depending on the motif, hinge finishes are often selected to compliment the door or trim color. Example: brass metal finish often used with tan trim/doors or natural wood finishes. Chrome or brushed nickel hardware is popular with white trim/doors. Hinges and passage sets come in a lot of ...


12

Probably yes. And probably an oil based primer unless the can says otherwise. On top of that a concrete primer if they exist. If you don't prime then you run the risk of the paint peeling, especially since garage floors are so smooth. Plus you might run through way more paint than you think and need to get more since concrete is so porous, it will soak ...


12

For small holes like you describe, I'd use Light Weight Spackle rather than standard vinyl Spackle. The Light Weight Spackle is very easy to apply, will almost disappear in small pin holes, and you can smooth it off with a damp cloth apx 15 minutes after application. using a damp cloth also removes excess Spackle from surrounding paint so the only patch ...


12

These are stains caused by resin from knots. To cure this problem you will have to strip the paint from the knot and surrounding area and then paint the area of the knot with knotting solution this will seal the end grain of the knot and prevent subsequent staining. Reprime the stripped areas of wood and then repaint the whole piece.


12

Yes, you should prime the whole surface. Sealing/priming helps prevent penetration of vapors and moisture from the air into the drywall. If you don't seal the entire surface, even though it's behind cabinets, penetration can happen - mind you it's not going to be significant but it can happen. Plus the time involved to paint behind those cabinets that ...


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


11

I find that primer dries so fast that you have to do the job quickly, but it's worth it in the long run to get it somewhat even: any time saved by doing a poor job of priming will be more than made up for trying to get the finish coats looking good. The primer coat doesn't have to be perfect, but it should cover the surface (no bare spots) and it ...


11

Unfortunately, there is only one way to fix your boo-boo. Sand it back down to metal or enough to remove the drips. Next time, when using spray paint, remember several very thin coats are much better than one heavy coat. Always start the spray away from the object you want to paint. Move smoothly and fairly quickly across the area, then go past the end of ...


11

Absolutely not accurate!!!!!! There is no reason not to paint inside as long as temps are above 60F. Today's latex acrylic paints dry fast, adhere well, and apply well in moderate temps.( we always use some flowtrol to make it work longer and spread smoother) Actually, in winter the relative humidity is usually lower, so paint dries faster than in the heat ...


10

I have always been pleased with Behr paints from the Home Depot, though I know they are a bit pricey. From my experience less expensive paints tend to have the following in common (and I'm sure this is by no means comprehensive) less covering ability ... the pigments used don't seem to be able to provide as good a barrier to bleed through from what's on ...


10

I'd second Greebo's suggestion of buying samples, but we've found that painting lining paper works better. Firstly, you can move the patch around the room to see it in the different conditions that exist in your room - next to window, in the dark corner beside the chimney, etc. Secondly, you don't have to worry about a darker colour showing through if you ...


10

You will need to take off all the glue if you want a good finish. The paint will lift the glue, but unevenly, and mix with the paint. This will cause the paint to clump and not cover properly and all in all it will look terrible. I know because I did this in the first house I owned and had to wash the walls of the one room where I tried this several times ...


10

You can apply the paint initially anyway you like, but to "finish" it you should roll up and down, moving the brush towards the handle side as you roll. The handle side gets the most pressure, so moving in the direction of the handle means that as you lap and overlap and overlap the paint moving along the wall, the lightest pressure is always the last ...


10

I was quite skeptical about the paint and primer combo's, but Valspar gave me a couple of gals to try out. I was surprised how well it covered over dark colors. The down side was that it is not as smooth as regular premium grade paints. It seemed a bit dry going on, but that is because it is very high in clay content. I decided the best combo was to use ...


9

I've used the Shur-Line Paint Edger with some success -- mostly against the ceiling, though. Some tips for using it: Don't get overzealous and load tons of paint on it - it will just overflow onto the spacer wheels and track nicely spaced marks across your ceiling. Another side effect of too much paint is a raised bead of paint on the wall beneath the ...


9

Couple things come to mind: Don't go back to previously painted areas until that area has completely dried. While the paint is drying it will look splotchy and uneven. Walk away, don't touch it, and come back in about 4-6 hours when it has dried. It will then look even. Make sure you are putting enough paint on the wall and don't try and stretch a ...


9

We were in the same situation as you last year. Benjamin Moore recommended that we use a sealing latex primer first on the new drywall and then use the Aura pain. It worked out really nicely for our walls. As an aside, primer is a fraction of the cost of Aura paint. So if you have to do do 1 coat primer + 2 coats Aura versus 3 coats of Aura, the primer + ...


9

Good question Nick. I manage several rental units and have dealt with the same situations. Originally, flat paints were used in most of the rentals and almost every couple of years they needed repainting especially if kids were in the unit. Flat paint is hard to wash and very susceptible to marring and finger prints etc. The newer flat enamels are better, ...


9

Patching: When patching smaller holes, a 6" taping knife should suffice. Apply the compound in a few light coats rather than a single heavy coat, and sand between each coat. You can either sand the patch using a sanding block like the 3M® Fine/Medium Large Drywall Sanding Sponge, or wet sand using a slightly damp rag. If you choose to wet sand, let ...


9

When you say you can see the brush marks, do you mean that they're actually irregularly surfaced? I mean - are we talking just a visual effect or an actual difference in the depth of the paint? If the latter, do a skim coat with lightweight joint compound and when it dries, either lightly sand OR smooth with a large, slightly damp sponge, then apply ...


9

I would suggest a paint plunger which doesn't require a drill and is more thorough in stirring the paint than a paint stick. Just use a plunging motion to get the paint from the bottom of the can to mix thoroughly though the tin, they come in different sizes as you see for different size paint cans.


9

My dad and his dad were both professional union painters. They taught me that for small spots of spackle on the wall, all you have to do is put a quick layer of regular paint over them with a brush while you're doing your cutting-in brushwork. The spot over the spackle will be mostly dry when you go back over it with the roller later. I know from personal ...


9

I never tape anything and people are amazed at the crisp lines I paint in my home. I use a high quality angled brush for this. Depending on my wrist fatigue and room, I work from either left to right, or vice versa with this technique. This is self-taught and I have no idea if their is a name for this. I load the brush up with plenty of paint and then ...


8

A good brush and painting by hand is the easiest and best methodology. But if you want to try a more advanced technique that is less prone to errors, and if you are like me and your hand shakes, then try this: Let's assume that you have 2 walls. The one you want to paint is blue, and the other is a white wall. Place tape on the white wall, right at the ...


8

Painting with a roller leaves an "orange peel" type texture that you can't match exactly with a brush. When you brushed your new paint on, the orange peel texture in the unsanded areas just telegraphed through your new brushed paint, but the smoothly sanded parts had no such base texture so they look visibly smoother. To fix this I'd go over your patches ...



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