New answers tagged

0

Maybe Merieah just wants to paint biggified computer generated pictures and emulsion's the cheapest option. I did something similar and looked up the ral code for the rgb colours I had.


-2

You could try sanding it with 1000 or 1500 very fine grit. The paint will then probably 'take hold'


5

Paint over it (or to either side) and ignore the strip where the paint won't stick. Pull it out and re-caulk with something paintable. Try to smear paintable silicone over the top of it and hope that sticks to the stuff you have. Hard to do neatly, pulling it out and redoing is more likely to succeed, IMHO.


3

Around stairs you either learn to work with pole-attached tools (corner foam wheel might do what you need) or you will be renting or purchasing some elaborate staging, or you will be finding that the elaborate staging would have been a lot cheaper and much less trouble than the trip to the emergency room or morgue. Admittedly the latter isn't much trouble ...


3

This is a subjective question, but ideally any paint that's not well-bonded should be removed. Eventually it'll flake off as well. That said, there's always a balancing act to be done. You'll have to assess the situation and proceed accordingly. It may not be economically practical to strip the paint entirely, depending on intended lifetime of the siding, ...


4

Although difficult to see and you are not sure if you have exposed the base drywall, I suspect what you have is painted wallpaper. The drywall paper rarely comes off easily without taking some gypsum with it. Because you have described three distinct layers, you may have wallpaper that has been skim coated with mud or primer then painted. What typically ...


1

I believe that crystal clear enamel or brass lacquer (actually not a lacquer- it's polyurethane) may be what you are after (enamel connotes painting metal). Please pardon the product recommendation, but Rustoleum Crystal Clear Enamel works pretty good, but Mohawk Brass Lacquer is specifically for the job. Spraying it on makes a physical difference- it is ...


0

Your finish work is only as good as your primer I always prime factory primed material but my primes is only as good as there's since it was applied first


1

A skim coat of topping mud would be my suggestion. I would rough up the paint and feather it across the entire area to give a professional look then seal and repaint.


3

A skim coat of drywall mud ("joint compound" when you are shopping - "mud" to anyone that uses it, normally.) Fill with a small (not wide) knife first, let it dry, scrape or sand any high spots (leveling), fill again with a wider knife, dry, scrape or sand any high spots, fill again with a yet wider knife (4, 8, 12" is my usual progression of knife sizes.) ...


0

A HEPA filter on a regular shop vac wil be fine, I wouldn't bother using a household vacuum even with a HEPA filter though.


0

You can use a left over matte finish (I'm guessing this is what you were talking about), but the blocks will soak it up and you may need a few coats for a decent look. I would start with a masonry primer first that will seal and fill the pinholes, then you can topcoat it with whatever you want. You can paint the floor, but you're going to have give more ...


0

In my opinion, you did not need to concern yourself with the priming the wall before skimming the whole wall. Priming a wall before pointing up (touching up) a wall is typically done so when the wall is sanded, the pointing up is the only thing that gets sanded. The primer will endure a bit of sanding, so care is used on that step. That was for informational ...


3

Many professional painters use a compressor and a paint gun to paint (usually) common latex paints in homes and apartments. Here's a couple videos about professional sprayers and another about residential sprayers.


2

You do need to have a primer for sure. Just a tip from someone who paints 20+ metal doors a year. Use automotive spray paint. Cost a couple bucks more and you can pick it up at local parts store or online. The colors are better, then finish is better, and they make some great looking clear coats. Two coats of apple red auto paint + 2 coats of clear ...


1

Clean it well and then sand at 400 grit or rougher to give the surface some roughness so the new paint can adhere. Don't go too rouch or else the scratches will show through. You can go as low as 80 grit if you use a fill primer before painting. I'd say 220 to 400 if you don't plan on using a primer. Check the directions on the paint you plan to use - they ...


0

I say oil based primer & paint. And the reason is, most of the manufactured doors these days are veneered & not solid. Water based Acrylic primer & paint are okay on a solid wood door , but is is bad for veneered doors. I sell both types of doors. And my customers are all told to use oil based products when finishing their doors. If they don't ...



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