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I just painted all my of trim this weekend, if it has a shiny gloss finish already on there, sanding them down a little bit may help you to only use one coat.


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I would use a high-performance 2-part wood filler (it's kinda like auto body filler). Overfill the area then shave it down with a Surform plane (a cheesegrater plane), then use coarse, medium, and fine sandpaper to smooth. That desk could present problems regarding paint, the surface (it looks like a shiny laminate) is designed for stuff not to stick to ...


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Por-15 does this too. Do not get it on your skin: it will not come off easily.


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It is perfectly fine to use the paint/primer paint in the place of paint. If you go with the same brand, you should be able to get the color code off the lid and any hardware store that sells the paint will be able to mix the same color again for you.


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I found it by searching. It is more than a primer. It actually bonds to the rust. It somehow chemically...does something...I read about it years ago. A user must be extremely careful working with it. You don't want it on your skin. You don't want to drop a bit of rust into the jar. You don't want to double-dip a brush into the jar. The whole container ...


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To fix the damage, you would need to sand down the entire table evenly to prevent creating dips in certain areas from over sanding in one area. I would suggest starting with an electric palm sander with 40 or 50 grit paper and sand the entire surface until the damage is removed. The table looks like it will be thick enough to do that. If you aren't ...


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I doubt there'd be any problems. After all, when the moisture resistant paint was first put on, more than one coat would have been used, therefore it is possible to paint over it. Just make sure you give the wall a good clean (i.e. use sugar soap) before putting the new paint on.


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This table top can be sanded down to fresh wood surface to accept a new finish. That is unless the burn mark is quite deep. Sanding out a deep burn mark could end up leaving a depression in that part of the table surface unless you would aggressively sand most the rest of the surface the same amount. Refinishing to still show the wood grain as present ...


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This is a usually a problem with with the sheen differing due to different application techniques. That is mixing spraying, brushing, and/or rolling. My guess is the paint was applied by a roller or sprayer, and the touch up was done with a brush. The sheen between the different application techniques will be different and noticeable. We usually try to ...


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I am not a painter but I have come in contact with this when I painted using oil base paint over latex base paint, or is it the other way around, any ways they do not like each other. If you can, sand the walls that are giving you the problem and repaint them.


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You ask how to stop it from peeling. Scrape it all off, properly prepare the surface, then repaint. Peeling paint is caused by poor adhesion to the underlying surface. Your's could be one or more of a multitude of issues: damp or wet surface; skimmed surface not cured prior to application; skimmed surface not primed prior to application; surface not sanded ...


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The shiny reflective property of a paint's sheen comes from a reflective particles in the paint. The more layers that are put on, the more light gets reflected back to the viewer. It's odd that this has happened with a low sheen; I have seen this with satin and eggshell quite a bit myself. I have got pretty results from patches I have painted by rubbing ...


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You want gel stripper. The gel will allow you to apply the stripper to the inverted and vertical surfaces (it will still drip, put something down on the floor). Use several coats of stripper with a scraper until the wood starts to lighten a bit. At that point you can either be happy and/or re-stain the wood. If you want to get it back to the base wood ...


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That wire wheel might help if there are nooks and crannys, like fine detail. But I am afraid what you will need is a lot of elbow grease and sandpaper. Starting with coarse and working down to fine, using steel wool and/or wire bushes for the detail work. Good quality chemical strippers are helpful if you are able to cope with the mess/smell/health hazards. ...


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What professionals use depends on the situation. A chemical stripper, in my opinion, is not the best choice for the situation depicted in your photos. However, you do mention a door in your question, and sometimes a chemical stripper would be a convenient solution for intricate detail work provided the door could be removed and laid flat on a workbench or ...



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