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I paint paneling frequently. The seams (lines) are more porous and tend to suck in paint and primer, causing the lines to bleed through. This is what I do for good coverage and professional look on paneling: 1) wash panels thoroughly, I use warm water with a small bit of Dawn dish soap (it cuts grease and oil). 2) use spackle on nail holes and cracks, use ...


4

That looks like a good justification for a phone call to the local sandblaster. Stucco's too abrasive to be depainted with metal tools.


3

Sand evenly across the entire board to make it smooth. Clean and remove all dust from sanding. Respray as evenly as possible. If you can get away with doing it indoors (a garage for example) that is recommended to reduce the number of airborne particles that land in the paint before it can dry. To ensure an even coat my personal method is to gauge the ...


0

I would definitely prime the wood first. I've had nothing but bad experiences with the paint/primer combos, even the expensive one's. I live in a rural area and am limited in what I can get and I keep finding myself in conflict with clients over this issue. They've fallen for the gimmick that you can do the whole thing in two coats. Not true and like someone ...


2

Solvent based primers are the way to go on top of Poly or other clear coat. If you don't want to deal with the smell though you will need to sand it well and apply a surface prep fluid. I personally use a product called no sand (yes I still sand before I use it). This softens the top coat you are working with allowing a latex paint to stick better. It ...


1

I have always used a grout sponge, cold water and dawn. If the cleaning takes off the paint then you need to repaint of course but most of the time soap and water works. Obviously doesn't help that much with an intense smoke smell (but painting might not either).


0

Depends on the quality of the paint and the sheen really. Generally speaking the closer to a gloss finish the easier it is to clean. Glossy surfaces are going to be less porous than flat surfaces, therefore easier to clean. If you decide to paint, like other answers have mentioned, always sand and clean the walls before hand. Prep work is very ...


4

The answer is "clean walls AND paint," if you're going to paint at all. Even if you do decide to paint over a stain you can't remove, you still need to clean the wall to make sure the paint adheres properly. I use TSP to wipe down the walls or surfaces prior to repainting. It cuts the level of surface gloss, really cuts through grease, and gives you a nice ...


0

In UK we use sugar soap to treat dirt from smoking before painting the wall. I suppose you can use it without consecutive painting.


0

Javex or bleach diluted in water will clean with a sponge or flat floor mop rinsed often. If too Strong and scrubbed , it can remove stains or slowly remove paint as well.


1

If it's only mildew or algae, you can probably just clean it off pretty easily with oxygen bleach (sodium percarbonate). Mix it up with water to the concentration specified by the manufacturer, spray it on the clapboard, wait about 15 minutes, then scrub it with a cleaning brush. I'd test this on a small, non-conspicuous area first to make sure it doesn't ...


1

A good quality methylene chloride chemical stripper should do the trick: messy, toxic, carcinogen, but very effective. Follow directions (ventilation, respirator, protective clothing). Use wet/dry sandpaper to remove lingering paint then buff with an electric buffer. It will come out nice. Then you can polish with car wax to protect and prevent surface ...


1

Sanding will leave irregular sworls all over the cabinets. Blasting will leave that shiny metal with a matte finish. Chemicals may or may not be rough on your lungs & hands & the carpet in the living room. Although it falls under "chemicals", try brake fluid first. Really. It's very effective as a paint remover, and its fumes and dermal effects are ...


0

Latex paint is water soluble and non-toxic. You can dilute with water and pour it down the drain. Alternatively you can just throw it out in the trash.


0

Generally speaking, shellac-based finishes can be used between any two other finishes. I refer you to "Understanding Wood Finishes" by Bob Flexner in which he makes this case. He does not; however, cover the your case of shellac over latex paint because the context of his book is wood finishes that do not hide the look of the wood itself.


1

Open the lid and let it dry out. Place it out of the way somewhere where rainwater will not cause it to overflow. Throw it out in a few weeks when it is mostly dried up. Do not worry about VOCs, this is an acceptable method of disposal.


2

You can definitely Zinsser over latex - just did it last week. Now will the Zinsser after latex not cover up the smell as much. I am not sure and not really sure anyone could say for sure but I would rather have it directly on the wood. Latex will sit and Zinsser will work its way in more.


0

Ask the Contractor to contact Rustoleum/Zinsser customer support If there is friction against your request, review the termination terms of the agreement with the Contractor.


1

What I have done on several occasions is to pour unwanted latex paint out on a sheet of plastic in the sun. spread it out so there are no deep puddles. After it dries, simply fold up the plastic and dispose as any other solid waste. After the can is dry, it also can go into recycling or the trash.


1

I picked up a leaflet on paint re-use at the local B&Q (UK DIY store) the other day. If you can't give it to a community re-use scheme they say stir in sawdust/wood shavings/a proprietary paint-setting product (similar to cat litter). The set (emulsion/latex) paint can then be disposed of as normal waste and if you empty the tin in the process that may ...


-2

Check out paintcare.org and see if that helps.


-1

I'd try the craigslist free section before I tried actually disposing of it.


2

Look to see if your municipality has a home hazardous waste disposal. I have in a large metro area and they have multiple locations and open Tue-Sat. I've been in another where they were only open once a month. But it is a good location to dispose of batteries, paint, meds and other chemicals I don't need around the home.


4

The municipalities just don't want it liquid or with the lid on. Imagine a paint can full of paint when the compactor squishes down on it. Paint everywhere! You can put whatever you want in the paint to make it more solid. Kitty litter, the store bought stuff drying agent, sand. I have used some old mortar that I had on hand. You just want to make sure ...


1

There are definitely pain removers out there at the local hardware. They have lots of fumes though so you'll want to be ventilated (:



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