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Do not sand or scuff up anything. Apply a coat of primer over the whole thing and allow to completely dry. Use setting type 90, light weight joint compound, in small batches, to smooth out the imperfections. (It comes in a bag.) Do not sand between coats - if you do, use a well wrung sponge, to remove excess dust, before applying another coat of mud. Use ...


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You need to get a wire brush and scratch the hell out of your wall in the bad area and a little outside of it. Add mud to flatten area. Let it dry. Scrape any high areas (with mud knife). Add a big layer of mud for a second coat. Scrape then thoroughly sand. You are going to have to prime and paint the area. If you just slightly prime the already ...


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Ugh. The paint is just going to make what should be pretty easy rather more difficult. Even your drywall pros sand stuff - they just waste far less time than amateurs trying to get the mud perfect (and messing it up more) - get it on, get it dry, sand, next coat. Drywall mud is made to be easily sanded. Paint, not so much. Don't even think about painting ...


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Cured concrete is a chemical brew. When concrete is setting, it doesn't just dry out. There is an exothermic chemical reaction going on. Go put your hand on it. It'll be warm (or hot, depending on how thick the pour is). My point is that if you were to mix latex (rubber) into the concrete mix to color it, you would be interfering with the chemistry and ...


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I don't think pressure treated wood should ever be painted. It just never works in the long run, no matter how long it stands in the open unfinished. PT wood has high amounts of metal and mineral salts in it that will always retain moisture from the surrounding air. It will always be wetter and change size more dramatically through wetting and drying cycles ...


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I don't know what type of paint is that you used (not trade mark and manufacturer but what type from the chemical point of view. But that's not really important. From my experience problem is that you just painted some places on the wall; patches.This is why you can spot differences. You should always paint over the whole wall, or at least one part which is, ...


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With the recent remodel work, I wonder if it is not the paint but instead the walls. Meaning the "shine" might be lacking on the walls not the paint. I use shine loosely here. Have you wiped down the walls? They might have a layer of dust on them? After a bathroom remodel where I did a lot of drywall sanding, despite my best effort the dust got onto the ...


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The pressure treated material will need to set unpainted for about 6 months. Not only is it excessively wet from the treatment process, it will leach some of the treatment through the surface for a time. In essence giving no surface the primer or paint to grip on. There may be water based stains that will work, but no opaque paints, especially oil based. ...


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I called a popular exterior paint company, and they quoted me about the same price whether the cedar is painted or stained.


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While you probably could, this wouldn't be a good way to try and match a color. It would likely effect the setting performance of the concrete and you'd never match the color of the paint. On top of everything else, it would be much more expensive than the alternatives - all you really need is the pigment and everything else that makes up the paint is ...



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