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2

For most finishes in indoor situations, I rely on a practical test: Get a small sample of whatever you're going to apply it to. Prepare that sample as you would normally. Open the finish. Stir it thoroughly (but avoid mixing air into it), getting ALL the solids back into suspension. If it seems unreasonably thick, add small amounts of the appropriate ...


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IF there are any volatile compounds in the paint that are important to its adhesion properties, then you would want to keep as much of them in the can as possible. Therefore I suggest that you shake the can as much as possible before opening, then stir. This will help keep as much of the freshness as possible. I've heard that paint stores will re-shake ...


1

I'm not sure about the clay smell. I think the paint soaked in due to the porosity of the wall. I can't guarantee it will work, but you might check into concrete epoxy, sealer or stain, or try using a primer paint first and do more layers like you said due to the porosity. Epoxy is expensive and might not like the paint.


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As soon as the spill occurs, generously pour water over the spill and use a shop vac to clean it all up. When I do this within a few minutes of spilling, the paint hasn't dried at all and it completely comes up with the first vacuuming. After 10–15 minutes, the edges have dried, but are still soft. Water + vacuum gets most of it, but some scrubbing ...


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Try white vinegar. Then use hot water and dishwashing soap to remove the vinegar smell.


3

Since you put a layer of emulsion down you basically have to start over with priming and then painting the top coat. Depending on the thickness of the coat of emulsion I have had to put two coats of primer on. I would go with the old Killz here (oil based) just to get it done faster.


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One big difference between interior and exterior paint is the flexibility. Interior paint does not have to deal with as drastic of temperature changes. Odds are after a summer the oil based paint (even if you put a coat over the top) will get very brittle and begin to crack, particularly if the paint did no go onto bare wood.


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Yes it leaves a very plastic-like finish. They are mainly used in areas that will be sprayed - like a hospital, school, public building. There is nothing wrong with putting this in you home but I offer three pieces of advise. Please test the color after using this on a small sample. And #2 after using this you will have to hit the walls with a heavy ...


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For a latex paint (water soluble) I added water and actually used a hand blender for 3-4 minutes, the result was an even, smooth paint. The paint was completely granulated before. Whether or not it stays on the wood will be determined in a couple of years... EDIT: The paint had frozen completely at least twice!


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I put a quarter cup of white vinegar in my stinky paint that smelled like arm pits,and no more smell! Love my vinegar!


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Depending on how much the particle board was compromised leaves you where you stand. It isnt rare that the board need be replaced due to wallpaper removal. Sometimes it is easier to just replace the wallboard or even put new boards over the old using a thinner board. The key word is easier, good luck.


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Given that you have wet scraped as much as you can of the old wallpaper off the wall (if you haven't this is the first step), I am guessing that you are left with residue and paste and maybe a little bit of "cloth". I suggest priming the walls with a PVA primer. After 3-4 days you can hit it with a 300 grit sandpaper. You will have a lot of spots where ...


2

There are citrus based paint removers that are less harsh on humans and surfaces than conventional solvent based strippers. They take a bit longer, but are worth a try. Images and links are for illustration only - not an endorsement of a product or source.


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Lacquer thinner does a number on many paint finishes. Use it generously and out in the open, it is very flammable. Don't breathe the concentrated fumes either, being outside should prevent that. Saturate a rag, and give it a go. Dipping is possible too.


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The answer depends partially on the paint being used and how many coats will be used. Instead of sanding, you could mud it if the remaining surface is in good enough condition, though getting the applied mud smooth and fine can be challenging. You could simply spray texture over the surface. A "hopper" gun is readily rented from many home improvement and ...


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If I'm doing another coat of the same color I put the roller in a plastic bag, double bagged and it's good to go for the next coat.


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You want to clean your brush / rollers in running water as far as possible, say in a sink or tub. I would probably clean the brush very well and simply change rollers between paint colors. If you need to roll the same color another day, just seal your roller in a 1-gallon ziploc bag or similar (make sure it's airtight), and you can use this easily enough ...



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