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1

It's either the knob or (much more likely) the thermocouple. Related: Oven wont heat past a certain point.


2

Great questions can always be asked with only a few words. But my answers never seem short. The short answer is that the stove can not breathe. Give it more air. Problem Fixed. What is happening, the chemistry answer: Carbon Monoxide is made when too much natural gas is burning in too little oxygen. Good -> Natural Gas + Lots of Oxygen + Spark = ...


0

There is no air mixture adjustment. If it's making CO then the airflow is simply blocked. Check all the vents, perhaps insulation moved, or there is something there. Also possible for rodents to live in an oven, and they'll move insulation to make a nest. There are vents on the bottom, and one on top behind the burners in the back (under the control ...


5

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


0

It would be unusual for the oven to only work properly at 240v, as this is not a common household supply voltage in the US and it appears from the Kitchenaid listings on most appliance web sites that they don't SKU up different voltages. Kitchenaid appears (from a manual I found here: ...


0

It sounds like the oven is working as designed. It is just not designed to work with the voltage provided. Until the voltage in the condo equals the voltage required by the oven, the same thing will continue to happen. Crisp burned outside, Raw gooey guts. To make things really annoying, an oven thermometer will show the oven getting to the right ...


1

Clean all the tubes in your gas burners. You might have baked on gunk blocking an opening, or even a spider egg case. Spider nests are a huge problem in outside BBQ gas grills. It's one reason why I no longer use gas BBQ grills.


2

Most likely No. Most electric ovens heat to certain temperatures by turning the heating element on and off with a thermostat, much like your home thermostat will keep your house hot. This is referred to as a 'Duty Cycle'. Basically, the element may come 'on' and start glowing as it heats. Once the inside of the oven reaches the desired temperature, it may ...


3

Option #2: Unscrew the other three feet a little bit.


3

Your cheapest and easiest option is a spacer under the foot. A small piece of plywood or a couple of wood shims will do the trick. Both will be available at a home improvement center or lumber supplier.


0

10/3 copper NM is rated for 30A under the NEC, so the old oven was more than adequately wired, and it will support the new oven without difficulty as well. If you are of the unlucky type to have aluminum wire in your walls -- 10/3 aluminum NM will still handle 25A, so you will be fine. However, the load must be considered as the nameplate load (no demand ...


0

I would use 10 gauge wire and run new wire. You could use the old wire, but I would check it carefully for cracks. My experience is that old wire tends to get cracks in the insulation. Since you are replacing the breaker and oven, you may as well run fresh wire.



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