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Ugh! Stupid carpet glue! Two years ago I tore up the outdoor carpet and have been left with the horrible glue since. I have scraped at it with one of those industrial razor on a stick things, picked at it by hand, and looked up anyone on the face of the earth who can get it off.... But all I found was extremely flammable materials and tediously long ...


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The ring won't move, really. The bricks would be more for aesthetics than anything. I wouldn't use mortar. It will be outside and constantly subject to warming and cooling cycles...not to mention water. Instead go with a dry stack brick (or, what I did, retaining wall blocks...they're a bit more substantial and stay in place). As for ash removal, there's no ...


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The long and the short: Lava rock vs. gravel isn't important except aesthetically. Use mortar not concrete for binding (in general). All mortar is heat resistant, but you can look for mortar which includes fire clay or get information about mixing your own here (experience suggests that this step is strictly optional, but I will be doing that anyway). It ...


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Add concrete (or asphalt patch) until the slope is to the drain, or break out concrete, possibly lower the drain, and replace concrete broken out with concrete that slopes properly to the drain. A thin topcoat to correct the slope may not last for long, but it's easy to try for a start. Breaking out and replacing will result in a thicker pour that's ...


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Probably just replacing the winding mechanism makes the most sense. If penetrating oil fails and you want to try a more extensive rust removal approach, either soak them in a citric acid solution or try electrolytic rust removal (washing soda, water and low-voltage DC electric current.)


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I think it is pretty funny people think concrete prevents rust. What causes rust is water. Guess what is inside concrete? Water. Ever seen old bridges falling apart on the highway, with the rusty rebar sticking out and all brown and the concrete cracking and falling away. You know why that is? It is because concrete has water in it, and it rusts the rebar. ...


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Your problem has been solved by science! Use a galvanic anode. Attach a block of zinc (bare metal to bare metal) torward the bottom of your pole before you bury it. The one catch is that you may have to isolate the safety ground from the pole.


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There are many options. Stainless-steel pipe would be the simplest and most direct one, given your non-concrete desire. For that matter, at 4-5" schedule 80 PVC conduit will probably work fine and never rust (it paints nicely) for somewhat less cost than stainless steel, unless this is a really tall light (seems unlikely, but you didn't say.) You'll ...


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Make sure concrete is above ground. 3-4" is usually good. This will keep standing water out. Paint metal before putting it in concrete. A metal primer and a sealant coat goes a long way. Slope concrete form away from pole on the top 1-2 inches. If you do this right the concrete at pole will be about a 1/2" taller than concrete at edges. Your pole is ...


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I'd build out from your existing roof, in line with the peak on the new verandah. (Call this a dormer.) Fill in the gable end of the new dormer on the existing roof (just as in the picture you provided), and you won't have problems with leakage in the door area. (Nor would you need a gutter.) The only faintly tricky part of this is that you'd need to tie the ...


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Metal and/or fully adhered rubber flashing and drip edge on top of door trim placed under siding. Oil based finish to door and frame. Seal bottom and side edges of door with oil based finish.



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