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11

Probably you have two or more phone jacks daisy-chained together. One cable goes to wherever the phone line enters the house and the other runs to another phone jack somewhere else in the house. This is a common practice. I did some pricing online, and it seems that Cat 5e is comparable in price to 4-conductor phone cable, so the builders may simply have ...


10

The first thing working against you is that bass is the hardest frequency to dampen. With a wide wavelength, they travel further and induce vibrations in large objects. In short, the usual egg crate foam isn't enough. The good news is that these are often custom built when created, and a simple Google search for bass traps will yield plenty of instructional ...


8

Bleeding radiators is quite simple, and can usually be done by homeowners. All that's required is a radiator key, a towel and/or bowl, and a bit of time. Why Bleed Radiators Even with closed systems, air can still find its way into the system. When it does, it will collect at the highest points available (the top of radiators). Trapped air can cause ...


6

As the other answerer said, it is difficult to stop low-frequency waves (eg, bass). I am in the middle of a major soundproofing project in my upstairs condo bedroom right now (it's a two-story unit sandwiched between two other units). My research over the past several months has introduced me to a number of products, only a few of which boast high ...


5

Keeping the fridge full of stuff may stabilize the temperature and reduce the number of times the compressor turns on and off.


5

Yes, it's normal to hear a wood-frame house creak any time the wind direction or speed changes. How much creaking you will hear will also depend on the temperature differentials between inside and out, and the humidity. What you're hearing is minute changes in the wood as the pieces in the wood framing either rub against one another, or 'slide' on a nail. ...


4

There may be an accumulation of dust and debris behind the unit and near the compressor. Also the bolts or fasteners that hold it all together there may need a little tightening- give it a good cleaning and look for accumulated dust on the fan and fan blades.


4

Some motors have a start up noise, and is normal for that type of motor. My table saw does this. Starts out a loud 60 Hz hum which quickly increases in frequency as the motor spins up, then gets inaudible or washed out by rushing air when full speed is reached. Motors that do this are not really appropriate for residential blowers. It also possible it's not ...


4

I'd have a look at your draft inducer motor. Do a Google image search for "Furnace draft inducer" to see what it looks like. I has the same kind of impeller as your main blower but on a smaller scale. You may have some debris in there.


4

A white noise generator is like spraying perfume to cover a nasty smell. The smell is still there, just the perfume is stronger. The nastier the smell, the stronger the perfume needs to be to cover. A white noise generator produces noise that our brain quickly ignores. If this noise is louder that the outside noise, then it will mask it. But a word of ...


3

Throwing the main breaker on your electric panel is easy; you should try that. If cutting the power to the whole house stops the problem, then turn the power back on and start turning off circuits one-by-one. Hopefully they're labeled so you can identify the appliance or room, but this may take some trial-and-error. Here are some other possibilities I can ...


3

Popping sounds are generally either a sound from a spark, or a failure of an electronic component. They do not always mean that something failed. For example, plugging in electronics that use lots of power will often cause a small spark to form when plugging them in. As an example, my Lenovo laptop power adapter will often make a sparking noise when I plug ...


3

Most refrigerator alcoves are mini reverberation chambers, having hard sides. You may be able to place acoustic foam behind the refrigerator to absorb the sounds. If you're handy sewing, you could copy this design for a sound reduction blanket using polyester fiber fill used for coats. As a trial, just loop a couple of layers of the batting off a couple ...


3

I'm not sure why you're suddenly having trouble with water hammer, the old plumbing may have been installed in such a way as to mitigate water hammer. Since I have no way of knowing what the old plumbing looked like and/or what you changed, I can't say for sure why you're having trouble. So I'll simply talk about a couple ways of stopping the hammering. ...


3

Our old one did this just as it was powering down - we traced it to one of the supports for the compressor being loose, allowing the compressor to vibrate, and as it spun down it went through a particular resonant frequency which induced a wobble giving it a few bashes off a metal guide - sounded just like you describe. We connected another spring to the ...


3

The first thing I would check, is to make sure there are no blockages in the vent. If there is debris restricting the flow of air, it could produce noise. Another cause of this could be that the wind is blowing just rught across the top of the pipe causing it to vibrate, similar to blowing across the top of a bottle to produce sound. To prevent this, you ...


3

Couple options come to mind: Change the fan. Change the fan speed. Change the fan connection to the vent. Dampen the vent. Change the size or length of the vent. If you can't or don't want to change the fan, then try dampening the vent by clamping it somewhere to the building structure and possibly adding some padding or pipe insulation where it makes ...


3

It's probably just the pipes expanding and contracting under temperature changes. They can bind on an anchorage, then suddenly break loose. The floor and pipes do reverberate, amplifying the sound. The tension release and sudden movement can be very small, yet the resulting sound rather startling. If you can identify where the pipe is hanging up, you can ...


2

Sounds like the ducts expanding and popping against themselves and the wood framing as they heat up. If that's the case, it's nothing to be concerned of since they are designed to expand/contract.


2

The usual culprit is resonance. Your pump vibrates at a particular frequency, and while the mountings are usually damped using rubber bushings enough vibration passes to the floor/wall that anything else nearby that resonates at that frequency will vibrate if not fixed securely. Ducting should be your first check, but also floor boards, drywall panels, or ...


2

As you have deduced, the condenser coil needs to get rid of heat in order to work properly. If it cannot, the fridge will not work very well and it will eventually self destruct. So by providing a path to get rid of heat also will create a path to get rid of noise, so to speak. I suppose some elaborate baffled muffler system may attenuate the noise and still ...


2

While Tester101 provides a great answer for the classic case of water hammer, my situation is slightly different. The key piece of information from my question was that the noise occurred not only when faucets were turned off, but also when they were turned on. Doing a more focused web search on this turned up this post on TerryLove.com, which suggested to ...


2

Trusses used for roof support? Peak wind can cause truss movement. Look where wall plates intersect trusses. May be a nail sliding. Use a mending plate or hurricane tie to reconnect.


2

Is there any chance that, with the new sump, you also had a radon mitigation fan installed? A radon mitigation fan runs continuously. They are placed outside the living space - so in the attic, or sometimes in a box on the side of the house. They are not small. Failing that, I suggest you go put your hands on the sump cover to see if you feel it there. ...


2

There are a number of companies that provide windows with high STC ratings. The series 7000 windows from http://www.silent-guard.com appear to have STC of 40 and above. There are many other manufacturers that sell sound attenuating windows. I believe you are correct that to get what you want you'll have to specify specific windows. The way you describe ...


2

If you can disassemble the frame, separate the siderails from the head and foot boards. Use a crayon or candle to wax the mating surfaces of the wood. This will help eliminate the squeeks. If the bolt has machine threads apply a small amount of thread lock (Loc-tite) which is available at the local hardware store. Get the smallest tube you can as you ...


2

There are two types of noise in architectural acoustics: airborne and structurally transmitted. If people are screaming as they run down the hall, the screaming is mostly airborne noise and the running is mostly structurally transmitted noise. Airborne noise can be attenuated by constructing walls, floors, ceilings, doors, etc. to absorb sound energy. ...


2

Listen, sound patterns travel in the weirdest ways. My house is on a hill and there is a college a block away. Every night my house was shaking from bass and I was like "what the hell". I am thinking the kids were cranking up their bass so I ventured out on a recon mission. After a few nights of visiting the parking lot area I did realize it was a few ...


2

I hear the same noise and have done in a few houses. After years of chasing sounds round rooms I'm pretty sure the culprit is a tiny brown beetle I've found a few times, 1-3mm max. I'm struggling to identify it. My ex wife could hear it so I knew I wasn't going mad! It can really keep you awake for such a quiet sound! I live in West Wales in the UK.


1

It sounds like your coils are freezing over. This could simply been the result of not changing your filter, or the coils need cleaning, so there isn't enough warm airflow over the coils. It's also possible that you're running the unit when it's too cold outside. If it gets below 60°F you should be opening your windows instead of running the AC.



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