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In my experience, the best solution to resolving squeaky and/or isolated "bouncy-ness", is to use adhesive to first attach a small block (typically a 2x4 drop or similar) to the bottom of the floor, then screw this block to the nearest joist. If you were to screw to the joist first, then to the floor, the fastener might pull or push the flooring to meet ...


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To go along with gregmac's very good answer I would offer the follow tips. Make sure your rigid duct is ultra secure, especially near the fan. If it wiggles when you grab it then it will make sounds with the fan going. I strap these things in really tight. I rockwool the first 3-4 feet really tight. I smash it in around the duct. This absorbs much of ...


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There more restricted the airflow is, the more noise there will be. All contributing factors to noise: Diameter of duct (larger is better) Overall length (shorter is better) Number of turns/bends (fewer is better) Radius of turns (larger is better) Size reducers used (no reducers is better) Type of duct (smooth, rigid is better than flexible) Type of ...


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It's not a great picture, but it looks like the tub is supported by wood and foam. It's possible that the wood has rotted, or the structure that supports the wood has rotted or been compromised in some way. You can spray foam under there wildly, if you want. But if the structure that will support the foam (and tub) is compromised, it's not going to do you ...


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You can combine spray foam (to get the fit) with block foam (to take up most of the space) if you can get block foam in place from the access hole. Or you can use lots of spray foam - but give each application of it time, as it can swell more than you think if you apply a large amount at once. If you have to get at the pipes you're probably already in "rip ...



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