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28

I'm surprised the dripping is that loud but there is a simple solution. Drop a some rope, such as heavy sash cord, down the drainpipe and attach top end in such a way that at least a couple of inches of the rope is sitting inside the gutter itself. The way this works is that the water will tend to run along the rope, which should ensure the water runs along ...


13

Make sure you have carpeting, or even area rugs. Get some furniture in the place. Then move up the walls with various artwork, preferably some kind of cloth or canvas. You'd be amazed at how much a hanging tapestry absorbs sound. The emptier the home, the more you'll hear echoes. Edit: I almost forgot, hang some curtains.


12

Part of the cause of this may be turbulent vs. laminar flow. A high temperature will have a lower viscosity, leading to a higher Reynolds number, which contributes to turbulent flow. Add in surface defects from mineral build up, and you've got enough turbulence to vibrate your pipes to 'banshee levels.'


12

Step 1: Prevent air transmission between the rooms. Sweeps for the door or a heavier door; look at the heating registers and windows; things like that. You're saying the sound is muffled, which implies the high frequencies aren't making it in, so I don't think this is the major problem. Step 2: Damp the transmitted vibration. Put big heavy bookcases on the ...


11

I lived about the same distance (maybe a bit more) from train tracks for several years. Most of the trains were commuter trains, with two freight trains daily mixed in. The biggest thing to remember is that you're going to tune them out to a large degree as commented above. The advantage with the mostly commuter train composition of traffic was that they ...


11

The number one reason for creaking floors, staircases and furniture is they are assembled using regular nails. The problem with regular nails is the following. When you put load onto any board in your assembled staircase the board bends slightly and this causes it to slightly pull the nails at the places where the board is connected to other parts. After ...


10

In California for highways and busy streets they build sound walls, which are actually just brick brick walls. They use solid bricks, not hollow bricks, and the walls end up looking like this: If you are a good arbitrator or debater, you might even make a good case to have the city, county or state build it for your neighborhood. Another alternative is ...


10

Replace the downspout with a decorative downspout chain. Then water only drips inches to the next link, rather than all at once, the height of your downspout.


9

During construction of multi-unit dwellings, we install homasote on top of the subfloor (in the unit above yours). In the ceiling, we will add a layer of insulation. And then before installing the drywall on the ceiling, we would install resilient channel that keeps the drywall from directly contacting the joists. Your options post construction are very ...


8

The screaming one is probably limed up. You might try cleaning it with vinegar or lime away.


8

I guess you could try putting some thin foam or felt stick on pads on the inside of the door frame where the door contacts it. This should lower the sound of the wood to wood contact. If the knob hardware is also loud, try using some dry silicon spray lubricant on the moving parts and on the door hinges. Sleep well.....


8

I think you need to increase the angle of the vertical piece just slightly so the drips can't fall the entire length of the spout and then hit the angle portion at the bottom; instead they will silently wet themselves to the side of the spout and then roll down. Detach the bottom end from the house and play with the angle while you have a slow trickling ...


8

sometimes ductwork under pressure and heat can experience a sudden deformation commonly referred to as oilcanning. this is where large rectangular pieces of box ducts have stiffening ribs formed into them to prevent deflection under pressure. if a particular panel is installed in just the right (or wrong) way, it can temporarily flex when it warms up. its ...


7

There more restricted the airflow is, the more noise there will be. All contributing factors to noise: Diameter of duct (larger is better) Overall length (shorter is better) Number of turns/bends (fewer is better) Radius of turns (larger is better) Size reducers used (no reducers is better) Type of duct (smooth, rigid is better than flexible) Type of ...


7

I'm dealing with the same problem in our "new" (1992 vintage) home. Long duct runs expand and contract with conditioning cycles. In places where the duct is held tightly against the home's framing or other objects, sudden slipping results in pops or squeaks. Solutions generally involve either 1) securing the duct more effectively at the contact point so it ...


6

If the sound is reaching the other side of the office, it may be traveling along the ceiling. If there's another floor above the office, you probably don't have anything -- like insulation -- blocking sound waves from traveling along the joists and/or the spaces between them. Something to consider for blocking sound coming through the walls or ceilings ...


5

I found a pretty good way of stopping the noise. I cut some 5 mm thick rubber to the same width of the gutter then slid it in so it went just past the angle. It has poured down and they still run freely. So I hope this works for you.


5

The quality of speakers in your TV are quite limited because flat-screen TV's don't have enough room for proper speaker cabinets. As other answers suggest, the already reduced-quality sound is bouncing off the wall, which further reduces the quality by creating an echo. Definitely invest in some forward-facing speakers at a minimum. You may not have the ...


4

@BMitch has the right idea with furnishings and fabrics - it's the simplest, fastest and cheapest. Also, you can add soundproofing in other ways. Have a look at this question on soundproofing a large wall this one on ceilings and this one which has some good discussion on acoustic damping materials.


4

Here's a VERY simple solution. I've had this problem for over a year and it's been driving me crazy. I finally found an incredibly simple solution, and it's especially good because I'm in an apartment where I'm not supposed to be "fixing" anything anyway. Take a scrap piece of wood and wedge it between the building and the pipe at or slightly above the ...


4

In addition to the insulation recommended, I would also look into a solid core door and maybe even a doorsweep. Also look for the obvious like a registers on the shared wall.


4

Plants, a small carpet, anything that you can find to absorb sound.


4

Standard EMT tool for tempered glass car windows (after taping - packing tape preferred over duct tape) is an automatic center punch. A hammer and nail will work the same, it's mostly being a one-handed tool that's easy to carry that makes the ACP the preferred tool among EMTs. If you're "smashing the whatever" out of it, you're doing it wrong. It just ...


3

With newer, flat-screen TVs, there isn't much room for speakers. As a result, the sound from the build-in speakers is generally pretty poor - a very limited range, with no lows and limited highs. I believe that the problem is not directly due to room acoustics, but rather due to the quality of the sound coming from the TV. Even an inexpensive speaker bar, ...


3

Another thing to try would be a slightly more aggressive cleaner than vinnegar - I've had good luck soaking the shower head in CLR, making sure to shake it up every few hours.


3

A friend at work told me this one: Buy a roll or two of clear double-sided tape and put it on the bottom of the door and the bottom of the door frame. When the cats scratch at it, their paws get stuck/sticky (they don't like this at all) and they'll soon learn not to scratch at the door.


3

you can use an automated air jet/spray that activates when the cat comes close to the door (just a link I found wile googling "cat repellent door" no affiliation)



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