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23

Your gas dryer vents its combustion products outside along with the moisture from your clothes, so it is vented to the outside. Your oven doesn't vent out mostly for sake of having limited combustion. There are ventless heaters available. However you run it, though, any natural gas burning device will create water vapor and carbon dioxide. If it ...


12

If you have threaded iron gas pipe coming into the house, expect a MUCH MUCH larger job that it looks like if you do that - you have to start at the loose end of that pipe and back every joint out, one at a time, until you get to the siding. The typical way of handling that situation with solid siding (clapboards, shakes, etc) is to cut a notch in the ...


9

The possibility of the natural gas line transmitting the fire is extremely close to zero. Yes natural gas requires air, about 20% mixture of gas and air (more air than gas). Getting that mixture in a closed pipe, along the entire pipe, would near impossible without some pre-mixing first before the fire. Also if fires could be transmitted via the gas pipe ...


8

There are two types of tubing most people think of, when you say "flexible gas tubing". The first and more common, are flexible gas connectors. These guys are typically 3-6' long, and are used to connect appliances to the gas piping. They are only to be used as a short link between the fixed piping and the appliance, and so are considered a "connector" ...


7

The thermopile in your fireplace puts out millivolts, nothing near the 120V the light switch was designed for. It's probably just a matter of finding a switch with a low enough on resistance. A generic low voltage switch from a electronics store, or ripped out of a toy, would probably do it (for example a 12V SPST). Really here the smaller the better, but ...


6

Yes, it is a typical for the gas stovetops to light all of the burners even when only one is needed. Note that this applies to stovetops that do not have a standing pilot light. The oven often will have its own ignitor that operates independently of the stopetop. The reason for this may be in order to reduce the complexity of the stovetop design. With all ...


6

If the pressure you're measuring is the static pressure, that is the pressure in the line with no gas flowing, that pressure is the same everywhere in the line. You cannot increase that pressure by removing unneeded gas pipe. Instead, you can try having the gas company adjust or replace your regulator. If you're measuring the pressure while gas is flowing, ...


6

A gas pipe is filled with nearly 100% flammable gas—at least under normal conditions. Propane and natural gas need to be mixed with air (or oxygen) to be combustible. The ideal combination for natural gas is 1 part fuel (by volume) to 9.7 parts dry air. A mixture of more than 15% (1 to 6.67) natural gas is not combustible! So, no. Under normal ...


5

instead of sizing your current boiler, i would instead have a heating professional visit your home and calculate the heating requirements of your home from scratch.


5

I've checked the National Electrical Code and there are no specific references to receptacles installed near any type of fireplace. Your biggest concern is likely the heat produced by the fire, but that's a concern for the ampacity of the wires, and has nothing to do with the receptacle. Also, like all receptacles newly installed today, the receptacle would ...


5

You can tell very quickly if the outlet is at all special by shutting off power to the outlet, removing it, and inspecting it. It seems rather unlikely to me that the outlet would be special since it's not near water, and it's supplying power for a blower. Other than making sure you've got proper amperage rating, I wouldn't think there would be any ...


5

Why did they turn off the gas? To do some work? If that is the case then there is probably air in the line. The pilot orifice is small compared to the burners which means it will take longer for the air to "bleed out". Alternatively, there may be a button somewhere that you have to hold down (to get the gas flowing to the pilots) in order to light the ...


5

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5

It is (very) surprising that the gas company (Xcel) says "everything's fine." This document from a different gas company certainly calls out non-blue flames as an issue that needs to be resolved. As does this site. And Xcel themselves. Happening on all appliances does seem a bit less likely to be "and suddenly the air adjustments on all three went whacky" ...


5

This appears to be a simple misunderstanding of how a gas dryer works. The gas dryer creates heat by burning air and the gas together, then blowing the heated air and combustion mixture through the clothes and then out the dryer vent. In other words, the combustion gases are vented to the outside, per code, along with the moisture from the clothing. Since ...


4

I have installed a couple of gas fireplaces. Both came with instructions to operate the fireplace on high for at least five hours in order to off-gas the unit. This should have been done before you moved in. Now you are the canary in the coal mine! As far as the possibility that the unit was installed incorrectly, I am going to reiterate Michael Karas' ...


4

This does NOT sound at all like a normal situation. Either your gas fireplace has a serious flaw or the unit is vented incorrectly. I would stop lighting it and immediately get a professional in to look at it. At the same time you should use every avenue at your disposal to get the builder, contractor, and gas fireplace installer on the hook to look at this ...


4

I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


4

It is probably normal operation. There is a flash tube for lighting all the burners after the ignitor lights the first one. A small amount of flame out of that tube during furnace operation is normal. If excessive flame escapes from the burner tubes, a device called a "roll out sensor" will shut the furnace down.


3

You basically would build a bulkhead to contain this. Any enclosed gas pipe/water/electric should be built with a wall that meets code This means the bulkhead should be framed out like a mini wall. Floor plate, top plate, wall plate, joists and studs 16" O/C. Frame it out affixed firmly to the wall (anchoring the wall plate in the studs) and glue down or ...


3

My guess is that something in the gas supply line of the heater is whistling (a vibration is being induced from the flow of gas). This could indicate a blockage or deformation of one or more of the gas jets. It's unlikely to be any problem with the exhaust flue or with the water in the tank, as you say. The other thing it might be, depending on the tank's ...


3

Turned out to be the High Limit switch. The switch had burnt out, which caused the burner not to fire. Turns out when the limit switch senses the heat box is too hot, it shuts down the gas and forces the blower to continue so it will clear the excess heat. When the switch failed it always told the system that the furnace was over heated, so the burner ...


3

The electrical ground to the water pipe is required and not a hack. It is supposed to be connected as close to the supply side as practical, preferably upstream of any cutoff valves. There should also be an electrical ground connection to your gas line if any of the gas lines inside the house are conductive, like black pipe. When I set out to install the ...


3

Concentric PVC is a thing. I like concentric pipes because they only require a single penetration rather than two. Honestly, any of your options should be fine for a high-efficiency gas appliance and a three foot pipe run. The exhaust temperature of condensing, high-efficiency gas appliances is pretty low, which is why PVC is an option. PVC might be expected ...


3

The short answer is no, natural gas does not go bad in any reasonable amount of time. I wonder if you have a slow leak somewhere that is letting gas out, or air/moisture in.


3

Byproducts of combustion of natural gas are carbon dioxide and water vapour. Unfortunately natural gas isn't pure methane, it has other components (called condensates by the petroleum industry). You can see these other components by watching a burning gas flame - methane burns blue, other components burn yellow, orange, red, etc. These other components ...


3

The quick answer is that the humidifier/vaporizer causes the orange flame. This happened to us a couple of weeks ago. The gas company said they would send over a technician. He called us first to confirm our orange flame. He asked if we recently turned on a humidifier/vaporizer. We had. We shut it off and things went back to normal in an hour or so. I ...


3

The manufacturer's installation manual describes the plate that can be used, and even includes the part number. Which is available at Home Depot, and Amazon. It also says in the Protection section of the document "For tubing routed horizontally between studs, striker plates should be installed at each stud, and Flexible Protective Conduit, or other ...


3

One cubic foot of gas contains approximately 1,000 BTUs of heat, so 94 cubic feet of gas per hour = 94,000 BTUs per hour. That's about as much as a large gas furnace might draw, three times a typical gas clothes dryer, and twice a typical gas range with everything lit. One burner might be 9,000 BTUs. If you need to ask the internet for help with this type ...


3

Yes, it should be that simple. My first guess would be that you have a typo or a misreading, and that yesterday it showed 4814. If true, from the meter shown that would be a change of around 300 cubic feet, or about 3 therms. You can check your gas bill to see how many therms per month you are averaging. During my peak heating days, I can use that much, ...



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