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Finish Nail Gun, (what you're after) missing the rubber boot it comes with. Still acceptable for all but the softest wood. This is a wear item and easily replaced, or not. I find it better without it. Perhaps remove it right off the bat and save it for wood that really needs it, so it doesn't get abused. Footless, this is still better than the safety ...


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For structural applications, I prefer framing angles because: End grain nailing is almost always poor practice. Good quality toenailing is often difficult to achieve for people who are out of practice, e.g. non-carpenters working on a one-off joint. Framing angles can reduce the need to hold a piece in place while making the first fastening. Framing angles ...


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Nails are generally put in at 90 degrees to the wood (i.e. straight in), unless you are "toe-nailing". (see picture) It all really depends on the application. As opposed to just nailing straight in, like if you were nailing together a built-up beam (face nailing) - Toe nailing the wood is usually not bearing much or any weight on the nails, they are ...


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am wondering what the correct approach is I don't think there is a single correct approach. It really depends on the application and on personal preference. Hammering nails in at an angle can help them to resist forces that run in the same direction as a nail hammered in at 90 degrees to the wood. For building construction, in my part of the world, ...



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