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58

Screws are a "superior" fastener over a nail (they have far superior tensile strength) - especially if you're talking about screwing down decking. However there are many scenarios where a nail is the proper fastener for the application (attaching joists is one example - screws are brittle and will fail when subjected to the forces of a shear loaded ...


48

There is absolutely no reason to use nails in this day and age. I urge you to use 1 5/8" drywall screws. There are several reasons. Screws have much better holding power, they are actually faster to install, and they can be slightly counter sunk during installation to make mudding a lot easier ( especially with a drywall screw gun or a decent drywall bit ...


26

Nails are considered an "elastic connection". They handle wood movement much better than screws. Many times if you have severe wood movement with nails you will see things like nails that tilt or seem to back out. This is actually a good thing. Many times if a screw had been used in that case it would have caused the wood to split as it moved.


19

Screws: It doesn't sound like you're reattaching the entire floor; this is more like strategic intervals to solidify the fastening. Your nail/screw rate is not as important as if you were attaching a new subfloor from scratch. Glue and screw is popular for more reasons than just rhyming You're going through this effort to make it right. So do it right.


18

I think what you need is a Palm Nailer. You can get these in air or electric powered versions. They are compact and are handy to drive nails in tight spaces.


14

Here's another type of adjustable box that you can use. Just mount the box approximately where you want it and after you find the correct depth you can move it, even after drywall has been installed. Here's the cut sheet on it. Here.


11

If you have acess to Dremel or other rotary tool you can use a cutoff /abrasive wheel attachment to cut them off. They may have been inserted by a power tool that fires them in with a gunpowder charge. If this is the case prying them out will be difficult if not impossible. You could try a Sawzall but these type of fasteners are very hard and you will go ...


10

There are a few places where nails are backing out of the drywall in my house, particularly on the bathroom ceilings. I don't know the cause (movement? house is about 40 years old), or if "doing it correctly" would have mitigated against this in the first place. But it looks terrible; and I'm using screws as I repair areas to prevent this from occurring ...


10

For the record, they make adjustable depth junction boxes like this. They allow you to mount the box to a stud, and then adjust the depth at which the box sits on the stud. They also make Old Work boxes, that can be connected directly to the drywall using clamping tabs. The tabs pinch the drywall, and hold the box in place. Here is what NEC 2008 ...


10

Roofing nails are a bad choice for attaching sheathing. The wire gauge is too small and the hardness of the nail shank is much less than a framing nail. I personally like to use 6d or 8d ring shank nails for OSB. 8d common nails are Ok as well. Ring nails won't loosen or back out over time as wood dries and shrinks. The heads of the roofing nails can easily ...


10

Another method is to get pliers and a block of wood about the height of the extended nail ( protruding out the wood). Grab the nail out the side of the pliers and insert the block of wood between the joist and the head of the pliers. then use the leverage to pull the nail out, this is also great because it will not damage your wood.


10

I saw one of these on demo at Home Depot for $49 CDN: It's basically a vibrator that slowly drives the nail into the wood. I tried it on a big galvanized spike, and it went in effortlessly. However, you'll be faster using a decent claw hammer and a full swing. This seems to fit the bill perfectly for working in places where you can't get the backswing. ...


9

If you're covering them over, then a wack with a hammer so they go all the way into the joists should be fine. That's routine during a demolition. If you absolutely need to remove the nail, then get a large channel lock plier, grip the nail tight, and roll the pliers on their head to pull the nail. The long handle gives you lots of leverage to hold the nail ...


9

We usually use one of these standard nail pullers. Grab the nail shank and roll the plier to pull the nail out of the board. It has the best leverage out of all the recommendations here. Available from several manufacturers, end nippers such as Diamond horse shoeing nippers have longer handles for better leverage and the wide head doesn't dent the wood as ...


9

That problem used to plague me as well until I invested in a palm nailer: There are also electric, cordless versions if you don't have an air compressor.


8

Home Depot has them, as i'm sure Lowes, a Philips head bit with a collar around it that'll stop the driving of the screw once you reach the surface of the drywall; their used to counter sink the screw without breaking the paper (important) We used them in the kitchen and I'll be using them this week on the bedrooms; I wanna say a pack of 5 is less then $10 ...


8

Technically when using joist hangers, a specific kind of hardened galvanized nails are supposed to be used. This is because regular deck screws probably don't have the necessary shear strength. For a deck though, I've used screws before without any problem. Although if you were planning to put a lot of weight on the deck (say, a hot tub) I would be a bit ...


8

Screws. Nails will pull out over time.


8

Don't wait for the carpet installers. Find your worst squeaks, cut through the carpet and padding, and put the screws in there right now. Then you can hit any missed spots and otherwise stay out of the installers way tomorrow.


7

Nails are used in almost all framing and structural applications. Most code books are designed with nails in mind and will have specific minimum nailing requirements and patterns for different applications. Structural screws are coming more and more on the market every day, but because most code books don't include them you will need an engineer's approval ...


7

An easy way to complete a wall like you describe is to build it flat on the floor. That way you can screw or nail the studs to the plates through the plates. I recommend installing a separate plate on the floor or across the upper joists first. Floor usually works best. Then simply measure the shortest dimension from the floor plate you just installed to ...


7

Palm nailers are fantastic, I have one and use it a lot. But for very small nails in very tight places, I like to replace the nail with a small square drive finish screw and install it with a long bit extension on my screw gun. Quick and easy.


7

Looks to me like a drywall screw or nail has "bubbled out". It happens sometimes due to wall movement, especially with weather swings (like a real wet winter or a long drought). It also happens when moisture gets to a nail or screw and causes it to corrode. Hopefully your kinda new roof is not leaking. I don't see any signs of plaster discoloration ...


5

Definitely the Brad nails. The finish nails will leave larger holes (16 gauge vs 18 gauge usually) and will be more likely to split the wood. Based on the size of your shoe, i dont think you could use pin nails (18-23 gauge). The Big Box home improvement store always sell kits with finish, brad, and pin nailers for pretty cheap. Some have 2 guns, some 3, ...


5

I have to say that I am no fan of cordless framer nailers. I have had two different ones, a Porter Cable and a Pasload. Both were gas fired. The PC was a disaster. Had lots of problems with the propane cells seating properly and nails jamming. Got the Pasload, worked OK, but slow and the smell was so bad that I only used it outdoors. The gas cells are ...


5

I usually use a pair of end cutting pliers, to pull the nails out the back. The face of the tool is slightly rounded, which allows for a good rocking motion. Just grab the nail gently with the pliers, as close to the work piece as possible. Rocking the tool on it's rounded face generates quite a bit of leverage, allowing you to pull most nails out. Just ...


5

Don't dry fire brad nailers against anything you wouldn't drive a nail into. The instructions (PDF) specifically state, "against the workpiece," don't they? Use a scrap piece of wood for the initial testing. You may also want to limit dry firing to initial setup and any future troubleshooting procedures. Many newer nail guns have a dry-fire lockout that ...


4

I've done this before and typically I'll frame the whole thing with 2x2's (top & bottom plates + 2x2 "studs"). It can be tricky finding straight 2x2's though, so often I'll just buy 2x4s and rip them in half on a table saw.


4

Some finish nailers will shoot both trim nails and brad nails. Look for one of those. And yes, a 2" nail thru just about 1" shoe molding should be fine as long as it hits the baseboard straight on.



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