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12

Typically, drywall sheets hung horizontally are hung with the upper full sheet first against the ceiling, cut bottom sheet last. This is so you will have an indent at the top to tape and mud. Unless your wall is exactly 8 feet tall, the cut of the bottom sheet is at the floor, thus no indent. Even if you have an indent at the very bottom against the floor, ...


6

Actually, @Edwin gave you a good answer. I'll add a bit to it. The bubbles are usually from not mixing the mud well enough or not applying it with enough pressure. It is not unusual to see lots of small bubbles on the first coat. The second coat is going to be thinner and applied with a bit more pressure and wider knife or trowel than the first. Here's a ...


6

There have got to be many ways to minimize the bubbles. These kind of problems you deal with when finishing drywall require a certain amount of skill that, for me, comes only with experience. That said, I have a few ideas: Add a little bit of water. The further along in the finishing process, the thinner the compound should be. Mix well, even if you add ...


6

You will need to smooth it out by applying increasingly wide applications of drywall mud; depending on how rough it is it might take 2-3 coats. You would then sand it smooth, prime and repaint the entire surface. Unless the drywall is water damaged or has significant physical damage (doesn't look like the case), you will not have to cut out anything. On ...


4

My "drywall guy" (and the pros on construction sites) uses all pre-mixed compound in buckets. Green lid for applying tape, blue lid for top coats and spotting screws. He did say you can get 20 minute or even 5 minute dry mix and he has used these for very small repairs when you want the mud to dry extremely fast. These products have extremely short work ...


4

Paint will only cover up VERY minor imperfections, like pinholes in a wall (and even then, if it's a big pinhole, it may still show through). If texturing didn't cover it, paint (which is MUCH thinner) definitely won't.


3

I've done this on one room- taking a knock-down texture and skim coating it to make it smooth. The downside is that you then are able to see every wave, bump, and bobble that the drywall installers didn't bother fixing because they knew it would be hidden by texture. ;) I was able to get by with one coat and one sanding, but I was also applying a ...


3

Personally I would not lose a lot of sleep over this. The molding will probably cover it up. If not have the contractor make the necessary adjustments. Tape would still be needed for the seam that is above the door that we can't see in the pictures. Do you feel that part of the seam was properly done? There is also an indentation on the edge of wall ...


3

If this is for a small home project stop with trying to mix drywall compound yourself and purchase the premixed material in the plastic bucket.


2

Sand them flat (or even slightly dished). Apply joint tape to any cracks (my personal preference is mesh, though you'll find lots of opinions). Apply all purpose joint compound in numerous thin coats. (Purists would have you do the mesh tape coat with a setting compound. Opinions vary, but setting+mesh is technically better.) Let dry completely between coats....


2

If you are sanding the paper tape, you definitely need more mud. So put on more mud. Removing it would not really help, it would just make more of a mess you have to mud over. I suggest 3-4", 6-8" and 12" for a progression in drywall "knives" (a coat with the small one, knock off only the high points, a coat with the medium one, knock off only the high ...


1

I would agree with @ArchonOSX if you were a pro. Someone who uses it for a living will use a 5 gallon bucket of joint compound fast enough to prevent storage issues. I have always had issues storing the left overs. By the time I get back to use it, there is dry compound stuck on the edge that falls into the mix. I use the dry mix. I mix enough to use in the ...


1

You are getting these because the compound going on is too thick. My drywall guys start with a small bucket of powder and water and mix to the consistency of pancake syrup and then add the premixed stuff in. Basically to the point where it barely doesn't drive you nuts. It will make a mess no doubt because you will have drop everywhere. But this allows ...


1

Fill large gaps with Joint Compound. Fill small seam crevices with Joint Compound and apply Seam Tape with joint Compound. Keep Joint Compound below finish "grade" because it is difficult to sand. Cover over the Joint Compound with Topping Coumpound which, is easily sanded and faired.


1

From a diy'er who has made a mess of a lot of walls by trial and error, here is a hint. A cream consistency of 'mud' works for pros who mix and move the stuff fast with a lot of experience and a deft swirl of the wrist. For the rest of is it needs to be pretty thin, just thick enough to stay on the trowel, even if it drips a bit on to the drop cloth. Spread ...


1

A picture would help but...what you are describing sounds like flashing to me. This is when the sheen of the paint is not consistent (it has nothing to do with the physical even-ness of the surface). Flashing occurs when the paint absorbs into the surface unevenly, thus it is common when dealing with patching. Step 1: If the walls are really rough all ...


1

The whole wall doesn't need a skim coat. That patch just needs touch-up spackle, sanded correctly. The picture does a good job highlighting what you failed to do: bevel any divots or ridges with a sanding sponge during the final sanding. This is not something you can do easily with a pole sander; it'd be easier with just the paper in your hand if you've no ...


1

You need to get a wire brush and scratch the hell out of your wall in the bad area and a little outside of it. Add mud to flatten area. Let it dry. Scrape any high areas (with mud knife). Add a big layer of mud for a second coat. Scrape then thoroughly sand. You are going to have to prime and paint the area. If you just slightly prime the already ...


1

Ugh. The paint is just going to make what should be pretty easy rather more difficult. Even your drywall pros sand stuff - they just waste far less time than amateurs trying to get the mud perfect (and messing it up more) - get it on, get it dry, sand, next coat. Drywall mud is made to be easily sanded. Paint, not so much. Don't even think about painting ...


1

If there are bulges, it will be much better if you dig them out to below the average level of the wall or ceiling; that way you will likely have less to fill. If you have to dig out more than an inch deep, you will have to fill first with something solid, like a piece of wood screwed into whatever is available below surface. Then you can start filling in no ...


1

The ceiling looks to have paper tape under the mud, which is normally only used in corner joints. For a quicker turn around, and more satisfying finish - it would probably be best to scrape all of the tape and mud from this repair off, then re-tape the joints using fiberglass tape. After the initial coat on each of the seams, treat the entire space as one ...



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