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Securely screw your mounting hardware into something structural, and it's unlikely you'll "break the wall" unless you're planning on piling thousands of kilograms on your table. If your structure is made of wood, make sure you screw into the framing members with long screws. Don't just screw into the drywall or plaster, which are not capable of bearing much ...


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You are essentially asking for a floating shelf--albeit a really large one. This means all the support has to be hidden in a wall. Since you have a concrete wall, you're going to have to build out a new wall in front. A technique to borrow is how floating stairs are built. A steel support structure is embedded inside the stud wall. The treads then attach ...


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The hardware needed will likely be dictated to some degree by the manner in which the shelves are supported and how much weight the shelves are being asked to support. A true floating shelf will often use a french cleat as Keshlam suggested, often in this situation an aluminum version called called a Z-clip. This shows the short, clip style but it's ...


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Your existing cabinets are probably mounded with screws long enough to reach through the cabinet back and the drywall, then go deep enough into the studs to support the weight. The right way to mount cabinets is probably with a French Cleat. Those can be as simple as a pair of bevel-cut boards, or can be metal brackets manufactured for the purpose.


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1/4 diameter, 1.5 to 2 inch long (depending on bracket thickness) Tapcons. This is not an ad, it's what I've been using for 20+ years. They will not penetrate the inside of the chimney. Its painted so holes in the brick are a non-cosmetic issue. A wrap-a-round metal band would look like it's from the 80's and not anywhere near as strong. You can have as ...


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There is not a good easy way to structurally mount a pullup bar to a wall with gypsum board on resilient channels which does not significantly impact the existing gypsum board finish because the resilient channels allow for some movement.


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The 3.5" studs are either doubled-up 2x4s, or a sideways 2x4. I would use the 2" studs to mount it on because if the 3.5" studs are sideways, they will be more likely to bow out under load, and a regular 2x4 is more than strong enough to hold body weight.



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