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3

Luckily your mount has slots for the bolts so you have a bit of room to work. Get another (stronger, higher quality) lag bolt and put it in right beside the broken one. Leave a tiny bit of room between them if you can, but make sure it still solidly hits the stud. Predrill the hole. To find the right size, hold the bolt up behind your drill bit. The ...


2

I would bypass the drywall and long screws and flat mount 2x4 to the brick and then attach the TV mount to the studs with 1 1/2 wood screws. You would cutaway enough drywall to achieve a flat mount. You might have to add a 1x4 overtop to get the proper flush or slightly proud mounting.


0

The mounting kit likely came with wood screws. You need masonry schools for this job. Tapcon are common ones: You need to pre-drill all the holes into the brick/mortar the use these types of screws to anchor things.


1

Use the longest screw you can without excessively damaging the wall. It's far better to have a more stable installation than chancing the television from falling. Looking at it another way, if you use screws that are too small and are forced to redo the job, you're going to have more damage from the original installation than you would have if you had just ...


1

I think what you have are similar to these, sleeve and taper nut anchor bolts: source If you're real lucky, the nuts are still properly positioned and you can screw bolts back into them. I wouldn't bother though, my preferred masonry screws are Tapcons. I thought this question was going to be about lead wedge anchors, which if not totally deformed, you ...


0

Could be lath and plaster, depending on the age of the house? The wood laths (or is the plural still lath?) are run across the studs, and studs can be irregularly spaced if it's an old house. If this is just a drywall wall, then you might want to just cut a hole in it so that you can see what's going on structurally. You may then need to mount plywood to ...


2

Could be metal. Either metal studs, or you happen to be hitting metal plates used to protect wiring behind. I doubt you have THAT much wiring, so it very well could be that your wall is built with metal studs.


2

If the hole is fairly small (say <4" diameter), then you can likely get away with just covering the hole with fiber mesh tape and using a hard setting compound (e.g. Sheetrock 90) to fill the hole. For larger holes Craig has the "best" method, but I've used this method successfully for holes in plaster and drywall up to 3.5" diameter.


2

Drywall patches are available at most home improvement stores. I've personally never used one, so I can't say how well they work (if at all). Though for the couple of dollars they cost, it might be worth a try. There are self adhesive patches like this one available at most home improvement stores. Wal-Board Tools 4" x 4" Drywall Repair Patch Again, ...


22

Cut some short strips of plywood or even paneling (long enough to overlap both sides of the hole by a couple of inches). Don't cut your fingers off. Put the plywood strip(s) in the hole and position the strip so it is extending out beyond both edges of the hole, behind the sheetrock. Hold the strip tightly by pulling outward on the back of strip with your ...



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