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I do this for a (part of my) living. Steel studs will not provide the support you need with a cantilevered arm. If you want to surface-mount the TV then you can use toggle bolts through a steel stud, but a cantilevered arm WILL fail. The only appropriate solution is to open up the wall and either replace the steel studs in question with wooden studs, or ...


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I had a similar scenario a while back, where the only place I could practically mount the TV was in between two studs. My TV mounting bracket had 12 holes (5 horizontal top and bottom and two on the vertical). I used all twelve of them with hollow-wall anchors: I halved the capacity of the anchor so I assumed 5kg per anchor, giving a support of around ...


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I have used large heavy plastic anchors that come with wire shelving kits. They need to be pre-drilled with a bit slightly smaller then the actual anchor, then these anchors screw into the plaster. In my case, horse hair plaster with laths. My house is the oldest in the borough, over 100 years old. I have a lot of heavy things hanging on these shelves which ...


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So, I went with the mastic. Bad news - between not boing thick enough, and the fact it's pressboard, I didn't feel confident using any kind of screws to hold the door. I went with a pure mastic solutions. Good news - this in fact a door, so you can take it off. This lets you keep it horizontal, and put weight on it to help the glue hold. So, I took the ...


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A stud can hold much more weight than a 20 lb TV. However, since your mount extends, that 20 lbs will actually add a lot more force to the mounting location. You will still be fine as long as you are mounting directly to a wall stud. You should be certain that you are screwing it to the center of the stud. Also, follow the installation instructions with ...


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The correct term is laminating, then you should also toe-nail it. I could not find the nailing schedule for laminating 2x6's. Use 2 rows of 16d in a staggered pattern. Or go nuts and use bolts and nails. Consider adding brackets to all toe nailed areas (all four locations). If you don't own nor want to rent a framing nail gun, at least use deck screws, not ...


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Your approach is sound. I wouldn't bother toeing screws in from top/bottom. I would drill through both the stud and the filler board and attach with nuts/bolts/washers (as opposed to threading a screw into the stud). Two bolts above the bar and two below. Alternatively you can attach horizontal 2x4's across your studs with recessed lag bolts and then mount ...


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An alternative would be to hang one horizontal 2x6, 16-1/2" long, horizontally between two adjacent studs. That wouldn't be as sturdy as two vertical "married" studs, though. Yep, Toeing, or toenailing if you do it with nails. Nails TEND to be better - they're not as hard, but they're stronger than most equivalent screws. Another alternative would be to ...


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Through-bolt it (with big washers on the backside) through a 2 x 10 or 2 x 12 (or lumber that you feel is appropriately strong),like 24" long, attached horizontally to your 18" OC studs. Basically span the stud bay.


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A machine screw anchor is a good option for repeated removals and reinstallations. They're also available in standard thread sizes, so they can accept machine screws, eye bolts, or hook bolts. The downside is that you'll have to buy an inexpensive but specialized setting tool for each size of bolt you want to install. The installation process is much like ...


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No, they won't work there... but there are similar expanding anchors that CAN be used in concrete, with threaded holes so you can remove/reinstall hardware at will. Don't get the lead (lead metal) ones, get the steel ones. You can even get some with male threads, onto which you could install a loop nut.


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Why not just leave the bolts (lag, I assume) in the holes, screwed in below the level of the wall; then patch the wall. You can find them with a magnet if you ever want to reuse them.



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