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1

One trick is to undersize the holes required for the rawl plugs you use. E.g. if a 6mm bit is specified for the plugs, use a 4mm bit to drill the hole. I've used this trick to work with older/crumbly plaster walls many times (both on brick and with wood lathe). Note this is really just a workaround - RedGrittyBrick has the answer for a permanent fix to ...


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Use wood to reinforce and strengthen. Metal studs are just thin sheet metal that has added strength only by their shape. Even anchors and toggle bolts can easily rip out of them easily or over time. Many hardware stores will sell decorative beveled hardwood that could easily be screwed using several (or many, depending on the needs) screws along a suitable ...


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It may be better to mount from ceiling joists if at all possible, or else use a free-standing solution as suggested by Keshlam's comment. RC mounting on walls is meant to be flexible enough to absorb vibration, so mounting to those walls would either nullify the purpose of having RC mounted walls, or damage the drywall by exceeding it's structural capacity.


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I have a wooden wall shelf hanging up on my wall with Command™ strips. If you are planning to put heavy things on the shelf then it will not work. I have a plant on mine and it's been holding for at least 3 months. Make sure you get the Command™ strips that can hold the most weight possible, just in case.


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You can use structural screws, which, while more expensive then lag bolts, are much easier to install - most do not require you to drill a pilot hole and take only seconds to install.


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The term you are looking for is lag bolts. Those are what came with my tv wall mount (50in) and 4 of them held it tightly for 5 years and pulled the paint off the wall when I took it down. Drill your holes slightly smaller than the threading on the bolt so the threads dig into the studs as they go in.


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TL/DR version: It doesn't matter how many of those rails you put into any one sheet of drywall (assuming they are not crazy close together). Those loads won't interact with each other. The problem with drywall is preventing the fastener from pulling out - if your fastener doesn't pull out, then you're going to be fine. Longer: You can ignore the vertical ...


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Make an additional support! Just take a long plank (or whatever You may think of as an aestethically-looking construction item) and attach it to the studs (if You are sure where they are), then - attach Your hangers to the plank/support. Given this You may want to choose whatever You like to look good and it will function well. If You will use correct ...


2

100 pounds is not an impossible load. Heavy mirrors routinely weigh that much and are often mounted in drywall using two anchor points. No question, mounting on studs is much stronger and more reliable. Also, as pointed out by @Steven, dynamic loads are much more challenging than static loads. Repeated strong tugs could weaken an otherwise fine mounting. ...


4

It's hard to say whether your drywall will support this, it might, it might not. Big factors are the thickness, condition, and stud spacing. As well, if the bars ever experience a dynamic load like someone bumping into it, pulling on mugs, etc. it might very well fail while it was fine with a static load. The "right" way to do this is to open up the walls ...


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Can you? You could... but I would advise against it. A better option (depending where your skill set lies) is to make a frame for it, or glue the mirror to a piece of wood that you can then attach fasteners to. You could use a piece of plywood for instance, which is cut smaller than the mirror (2 inches on each side is probably plenty) so you don't see the ...



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