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18

Your TV is being supported by two pieces of paper. That should be all you need to know. The white plaster material in the middle of drywall resists compression. The interaction between the shaft of the bolts and the inner plaster is keeping the load from shearing straight down the wall and will support a significant load. However, on the front and back of ...


16

I'd try a few of these keyhole mounting plates: You'd need to be very precise with screw placement so everything lines up properly. If you're feeling adventurous, you could chisel or route out a recess so the whole thing is flush against the wall. You could also mount the plates to the wall at a stud, using sufficiently long screws, and then use smaller ...


14

Gypsum board (drywall, plasterboard, wallboard) is not a structural material, its only purposes are to prevent you from seeing into the next room and to conceal utility lines and structural members within the wall. Drywall anchors are great for hanging small picture frames, little decorative shelves, and other similar knickknacks, they are not for hanging ...


13

You might consider mounts like z-clips These are listed as 1 7/8 inches high overall, but you might be able to trim the height (a little off the top piece, a little off the bottom) to just a bit less than the thickness of a 2x4, recess them into the back of the piece, leaving a small lip of wood at the top to conceal the mount (the bottom would have to be ...


11

I would not risk hanging a glass shelf with those strips. They are meant for hanging things directly from (like a towel, hair dryer, etc.), not a shelf that sticks out. Instead of just pulling down on the strip, it will pull down and away, almost a guaranteed recipe for broken glass. Unfortunately there is no way to anchor something to the wall without ...


10

Metal studs are great for framing walls. They are super light, easy to work with, straight. But you've discovered one drawback...they don't have nearly the strength of a wooden 2x4 for mounting things to it. Metal studs do come in different gauges though. The heavier, the better. But it sounds like yours are fairly lightweight. Some options: take down ...


10

Why, of course! You're looking for a "magnetic catch". Just you should possibly install it the other way around - a metal plate on the wall, and the catch screwed on the mirror. Images added: Magnet mounted as plug in the cabinet with large head screw contact Magnet in cup washer and mating contact washer mounted with screws Thin magnet to metal plate ...


9

If you have a wall, you have structure. If your wall is masonry then the TV mount can likely be mounted directly to the masonry (or mounts are available which can). If your wall is drywall then you must have structure behind it... perhaps your studfinder is malfunctioning or you're using it improperly? Studs can usually be found beside original electrical ...


8

TV wall mounts should always be mounted directly onto studs if the total weight is that much. If all mounting screws are going into studs, the drywall thickness is irrelevant. Drywall anchors are a great invention, but not suited for the kinds of load and forces a swivel wall mount exerts. If you can't mount the wall mount onto studs for some reason (like, ...


7

Depending upon how large the grout lines are I would carefully drill through those with a masonry bit, and then use plastic anchors and fasten shelf brackets with screws. Use enough brackets to support the size shelf you need. Then, if the shelf ever needs to come down the holes in the grout lines can be repaired easily.


7

You would need to mount wooden strips along the walls that screw into the studs. Then the desktop sits on top of those strips and is fastened from the underside to the strips. To achieve a more sleek look you could also consider the use of some lengths of aluminum angle iron that is screwed into the studs and into the bottom side of the desk surface. ...


7

You could create a mounting strip using a dovetail router bit. Route out a dovetail slot along the backside of the long 2x4's. Top and bottom if you want, or just the top. (Bottom half of picture.) Create the mounting strip. (Top half of picture.) Pre-drill holes in the mounting strip to line up with the studs in your wall. Mount the strip on the wall. ...


7

This is an example of a typical framing of the wall you describe The drywall covers the framing and the white areas in between. In general, when mounting anything on the wall (other than the lightest of pictures), it is better if you can attach to a stud (one of the framing members, usually wood, but sometimes thin steel). To find out where the studs ...


6

NEC 725.55 does not allow you to run class 1 cable in the same raceway as class 2 & class 3 cable, so you'll have to run a new power cable outside of the PVC conduit that holds the audio/video cables. The best way to accomplish this (if you still want to use your SmartStrip), is to use one of these guys. You'll install one hookup behind the media ...


6

If photos 6/7 are indicating you have some kind of dropped ceiling, then you definitely cannot attach this to the dropped ceiling. It won't support any load. Best option in that case is to build a free standing structure and hang your bag on that. A couple of A frames and a beam going across the top where you'd attach the bag would be easy to build. Use a ...


6

looks like it needs bolts with very large rubber washers/gromets. even then i'd be afraid that the weight of the sink would just crack the mounting holes. the mounting holes you've got are 300mm apart, exactly as stud distance. use a stud finder. i have a hanging sink but it came with hardware: two vertical metal straps that you attach to the studs, the ...


6

The screw you're showing is a self-tapping metal screw. It's designed to cut it's own channel into metal and grab hold by cutting it's own threads - but it's not meant for repeated uses because repeat uses can damage it's own threads, making its hole too big for it. Take it to the local hardware store and get one that is slightly wider in diameter, and use ...


6

This should be OK, but I would recommend attaching the 2x4s to studs on both sides of the TV, not just the right side as you've shown. You don't want the weight of the TV to pull the 2x4s away from the wall on the left side. A 55" TV is going to be heavy and the eccentricity caused by the spacing of the wood and the bracket will cause it to pull away. ...


6

Your task is to find the studs.. Electronic versions of stud finders abound, plaster is difficult for most of them. I have a 1/2 dozen of them.. I keep hoping. The problem with plaster is the lath used to support it. The lath can be a variety of materials: wood strips, metal mesh and even pasterboard. All of these materials are attached to the studs ...


6

I find all the above answers to be quite good, but each is too busy for my tastes ... too many pieces, specialty hardware etc ... My solution would be to ... locate the studs drive 2.5" nails into the studs such that they angle upwards have 1" exposed I'd use either of these 8d or 10d nails: box nails, and a pair of vise-grips or slip-joints to cut ...


6

It's going to be more secure to use the studs, but depending on the weight of what you're hanging, it may not be necessary. If you're hanging more than 40+ pounds, I'd go ahead and use the studs. Instead of using wood screws or lag bolts as you would use in wood studs, use toggle bolts similar to the Toggler brand that you mentioned. Starting from the ...


5

They make many different types of wall anchors. I have used different forms of E-Z Anchors for years and am happy with them. They hold up to 100 pounds in sheetrock with their toggle lock anchors. 1 of the normal screw anchors can hold 25 pounds in half inch rock. I am sure those brackets have more than one mounting hole? Place on the wall where you ...


5

Step 1: Go to Home Depot or Lowes and raid the paint department for paint cards that look similar to the color of your bathroom wall. Step 2: Take the cards home and hold them up to the wall one at a time. You may want to get a friend to stand outside the room or get as far away as possible and view the card from multiple angles. Turn the lights on and off, ...


5

the thickness of a single sheet of drywall Did they happen to specify how thick that single sheet should be? I bet that they didn't and are being over protective, because they sell drywall in varying thicknesses from 1/8" up to 5/8". But I don't think they're being TOO over protective, because I think that's the exact same mount I used, and it mounts ...


5

As Legion600 suggested, you probably have steel studs as furring strips. You need to be sure you are not hitting protection plates installed on wood studs. These protect electrical or plumbing lines close to the stud face, and you must never attempt to drill through these. Usually, if you drill several inches above or below such plates, you will hit wood. ...


5

I agree with BMitch that there's horizontal strapping over the studs. You might want to try a Bosch GMS120 Wall Scanner instead of a regular stud finder. It claims it can find wood substructures 1-1/2" deep which is going to be about how deep your studs are from the front of the panels. The other side of the wall is probably an exterior wall which will make ...


5

but when I drilled it went in an inch before encountering a hard surface. Definitely not wood. I applied pressure and drilled, and it finally "broke through" in a matter of seconds This could be bad depending on what you actually drilled through. It might be a good idea to open up the hole enough to see what is there, but do it without drilling and do ...


4

Are you able in the garage attic? If so you can use the existing junction box and run a wire from it to a new receptacle box where you need it. Or two boxes for another receptacle and another light later. If your garage is unfinished then it will be even easier. If you cannot get to the attic you can use surface mount raceway. The raceway comes in 5 ...


4

With out any design sketch, a good way to bond wood to concrete is using threaded anchors or threaded inserts The dificutl part is placing these inside the concrete column, to be level and not get dirty from concrete. So using a fairly large size, so its easier to clean later, and easier to screw into. Basically you would then insert a metal shaft in ...


4

If the speakers are reasonably small, there are small mountings used to hang mirrors and paintings, that you could screw onto the back of the speakers. Something like these:



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