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When applying thinset, put it on in a flat coat first,, and lay it on thick, pressing it against the wall or floor. THEN go back at an angle and notch it, removing excess. This makes sure the thinset has good contact with the wall over the whole area and will bond well. Laying it on at an angle, so it's notched in one pass, doesn't spread the thinset over ...


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The reason for cement board is to give a good adhesion surface and to increase stability. When a floor flexes from the weight of people walking, or from movement of the house, grout and even the tiles themselves can crack. For a temporary platform intended for a cat box, you're not looking at a lot of weight causing flexing, so I doubt there'd be much ...


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Your thinset should be like peanut butter. If it is too thin then you could have possible issues with mosaics and flooring. Basically you could push down to bare floor or close to it. A 4mm trowel is perfect size for most mosaics. I think that your issue is that either you aren't combing the area well enough after dropping down your thinset or possibly ...


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Once the initial set/superficial hardening has taken place, water should not be a problem. Excess water is a big problem when it can still alter the mix of the cement or wash it away - after that, it won't have much effect. On the other hand, it will be difficult to "dry the steps well" with water trapped under the tiles, so covering would probably make ...


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Unless you're going to be getting a lot of heavy traffic on these stairs (like dragging things up and down them), you should be fine without putting a nose on them. As long as the tile is set and grouted properly these aren't going to go anywhere. Just to give an idea of the longevity and wear resistance, there's a house near where I live that was built in ...


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Absolutely. Those tiny tiles will chip or pop off as soon as somebody smacks it with something. I assume you are thinking of some nosing like this and where I live, I would certainly go with something with some grip. Not knowing what kind of traffic the stairs get and what your climate is like (how often it freezes - how often they are wet), it's hard to ...


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Its likely the box itself is recessed and the ears of the outlet is sitting on top of the tile, connected by longish screws. The solution is to break off the ears and recess as needed. Spacers may be needed if the box is too deep. Similarly, a box extender should be used if there is a gap between the wall and the box. Without plaster ears With ears ...


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Generally, it is possible to turn off the power, remove the switch, and then cut the nails that are holding the box in place (a recip saw can do this if you are careful). You can then drill holes through the box, push it so that it is flush, and then screw the box back to the stud. This is fairly finicky work.


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Whatever you end up doing to cover the area you should first take steps to completely remove the previous cat smell. Cat's have sensitive noses and if a new cat can smell even a trace of the previous smell they will get the immediate idea that it is OK to urinate in that area again. There are cleaners that work really well at removing the smell after you ...


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I've never done or heard of this, but most of my small tile work has been with presheeted tiles I did read about a mosaic system where the layout was done face up and a mesh was attached, and the tile was thin-setted and afterwards grouted. I've also seen a TOH segment where the mosaic was attached to a thin cement board (1/4"), grouted and then the whole ...


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Generally glass bonding is done with a special adhesive that is UV cured. I'm uncertain as much as far as the cost for it. I have always used silicone to bond glass, it's what my family business uses to assemble/repair fish tanks. The silicone would also work perfect for you in place of grout.



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