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13

Kilz is not anti-mold paint. Once the source of the moisture has been corrected, go to your local Home Depot and buy Concrobium fungicide spray. It's all natural and an encapsulant. It comes in a spray bottle. Follow the directions. This will kill the mold as well as prevent new mold from growing. Once that is done you can cover the area with Zinnser Bulls ...


11

First find out whether it is mold or not. What you do next depends on this. Assuming it is mold you need to do two things. Clean it off - disinfectant/bleach solution should do the job. Find out why it's forming. This is the important bit as if you just do the first step it will come back. The usual cause is condensation which in a bathroom means you ...


10

Andrew, excellent question and great photos. The problem is a bit complicated. I can see from the photos that the water migration is coming from the top, perhaps even above the top of your window. Anytime the plaster separates from a concrete base, it means the moisture is coming through the concrete, most likely from the out of doors in your case. ...


9

Every answer here suggests using a water-bleach solution, though I am suggesting cleaning the mould (if that is what it turns out to be) with just soap and water. And I have my friends Health Canada and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Council to back me up. CMHC is not a health authority, but they do have an interest in damage to mortgaged-backed homes ...


9

To remove surface mold I use a 4:1 mixture of water:bleach. Spray on liberally and allow to sit for about 15 minutes. Rinse with water and wipe clean. If you need to use a brush to scrape off heavy deposits, I recommend brushing away from your face or preferably wear an appropriate mask and goggles. The mold spores are probably more dangerous than the ...


8

This is a problem best suited to the professionals, but if you must do it yourself the number one priority is the safety of you and those around you. This can be a very hazardous task, if you do not take every precaution to contain and remove the spores properly. The first thing you'll have to think about is containment, you don't want to spread the mold ...


7

General construction advice for 'general' showers: In/on the walls: use RedGard as a vapor barrier over the cement board use paperless or blueboard sheetrock use mildew resistant pain adequately vent the room with a proper exhaust fan In the shower construction itself: seal all caulk properly make sure standing water can't puddle Now, all that said, ...


7

I am a certified home inspector, so I am a little reluctant to answer this question. I will, however spill a few thoughts. In recent years, the tests you refer to have become fairly popular, but normally in houses that show some signs of water or mold. I personally would only recommend an infrared scan if there was suspicious water spots or paint peeling on ...


7

General practice is going 6 inches above molded area and cut it out. You must inspect the backside of the drywall. If you can't you need to keep cutting out until you hit 6 inches of unaffected wall. You then need to follow a mold remediation plan - not sure how anything else in the wall looks but useless replacing the drywall if you will put up new ...


6

I would second the comments recommending a second opinion. A sump is in the basement to allow water to be drained away if it accumulates around the footings. If there's no water there it quite probably means that your water table is low enough that there's not seepage. It also would indicate that you have decent drainage around the house and rain water is ...


6

Cover the vent They sell magnetic vent covers at nearly all hardware stores. Buy one, and cover the vent when it's not being used. This will prevent moist air from entering the vent, though it may not stop water if it pools around the vent. Install an exhaust fan Install a properly sized exhaust fan in the bathroom. Let it run during showers, and for ...


6

Vapour barrier goes on the cold side of the insulation. The problem here is that for an unheated, Un-airconditioned shed, the outside will always be the cool side. Insulation won't stop heat transfer, it only slows it down. A closed shed, no matter how well insulated, will always turn into a sauna. Now you have a hot, steamy inside, and a (relatively) ...


5

When I've had to re-stain decks or chairs etc with a little mold on them I've always used a bleach solution. Mix a little bleach with some water and apply it to the mold (spray bottle, or brush). The bleach will kill the mold quickly (just let it sit there). Then lightly sand the mold off (just to get rid of the moldy texture) and re-paint. Good luck


5

There are thousands of species of mold known to Science, with different species being found in different parts of the world. There isn't any one "crawlspace" mold or "air duct" mold, it's just whatever spores of whatever species happened to take a foothold there. Which one is more dangerous will depend on the particular species of mold and the sensitivity ...


5

You can wrap the drain line in electric pipe heating tape to prevent it from freezing: You should be able to find it at your local home improvement store.


4

You want to apply a penetrating grout sealer. This one says that it last up to 5 years depending on conditions. The key for the sealer to last as long as possible on a backsplash is to avoid cleaning it with "harsh cleaners" like bleach and antibacterial sprays. You want to use something that is not going to remove the grout sealer when cleaning the ...


4

You can start off with taking a 50/50 solution of bleach and water, then spraying the mold with it. Wait a few days. To prevent it in the future, when showering you should be using the bathroom fan to allow the hot air to be exhausted outside rather than condense on the walls and ceiling (which are made of drywall of course). They also make ...


4

There's a lot of good advice here on cleaning the inside of the fridge. One thing I'd like to add: Don't forget to periodically clean the fridge's coils. The coils are typically found underneath or on the back of the fridge, and are meant to dissipate the heat. The coils will, over time, get blocked with dust etc. and the fridge runs less efficiently as a ...


4

Mold detection and identification can be done in two ways. Visible mold can be collected on a test tape, and air borne spores can be collected with an air sample kit. Either way, samples must be sent to a lab for microscopic inspection and ID. Mold and mold spores can range from common everyday varieties that rarely have negative effects on humans to very ...


4

My guess is that the mould has grown into the grout; live or not, the bio-gunk they have produced has stained the grout. A complete re-tiling should not be necessary; you should be able to simply remove the old stained grout between tiles and re-grout. You can remove and replace the stained/mouldy caulking as well. There are attachments for almost any ...


4

My experience is that the black growth actually gets right into the bath mat material and cannot be easily removed. I suggest that you replace the mat and then use an alternate procedure when stowing the mat after use. After use always rinse it off well so no bath scum and other things are left on it. Then hang it up over a towel bar, suction cut side up, ...


4

Greenboard is sheetrock where the paper is water resistant (but not necessarily water proof). A better alternative to greenboard is to use a paperless sheetrock product like Densarmor, which uses a fiberglass backing rather than paper (it's the paper that mold likes). Note that these products aren't designed for wet applications, however. At best, they are ...


4

I've seen peroxide and bleach mixtures used frequently to remove mold on studs. The Natural Resources Defense Council suggests mixing a 1 in 10 bleach solution to clean. The NRDC might be a little too "green" for some people, but the Environmental Research Laboratory at the University of Arizona also has a great article regarding this. They suggest a ...


4

So you have a couple of options that will minimize the mold right away: Wall boards. Large stone sheets - I have put up a few granite systems and they are not getting any mold. Larger tile. If you choose wall boards or large stone sheets then you still need to caulk. There are caulks - not usually sold at the big box - that are virtually mold proof. If ...


3

I had a similar problem and here's what I did. using a scraping tool I removed the old grouting-glaze I used Zep (incredibly effective with mold but really stinky) then I cleaned the shower with water and let dry purchased a tube of silicone caulk from Home depot applied the a new layer of caulk where the old one was removed To maintain a mold/mildew ...


3

A question - were there elevated spore levels in the rest of the house? It sounds like you disturbed something removing the old drywall. If that's the case you might be OK. You need to identify the source. Once you've done that you can usually deal with the problem yourself. The hard part is going to be identifying the source. Mould is usually caused by ...


3

Take a walk through with the home inspector and see what he says. If you are still interested in the house, find a good general contractor (that you trust) and take him on a walk through. The contractor should be able to give you a good estimate on what it will cost to fix any issues, he may also give you some price breaks if you are willing to let him ...


3

Yup, probably mold. First you'll want to clean it up. A weak solution of water and bleach should do the trick. To make sure it stays gone, you'll want to make sure your bathroom is properly ventilated. If you don't have a vent fan, you'll want to install one. If you already have one, you'll want to make sure you use it. Hooking it up so it ...


3

If you're not exposing your tiles to a lot of water (especially in a splashback/backsplash type application), I don't think you'll need to reseal as often as you think. I used a silicone sealer product which comes in an aerosol can, just spray it on and once the stuff has soaked into the grout a bit, wipe off the tiles and you're done. I can deal with ...


3

A dehumidifier should remove the moisture (I've also had success with DampRid) along with some kind of scent remover like Febreeze or something similar, but I'd be more concerned with additional moisture building up. I'd check more into how the moisture is getting in to begin with. The caulk may have sealed the gap but do you know for sure that no more water ...



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