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Welcome to the wonderful world (or mold) of wet basements. Assuming you've stopped it for 3 hours after running 30 minutes: So long as water is coming in, the dehumidifier needs to keep running on the humidistat. In half an hour you're pulling the easily available water in the air down to 50% - but there's an entire earth of more water wanting to replace ...


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To add to the already excellent answer already given... if humidity in your area is exceptionally high, some moisture will always tend to condense on the basement walls (they're cooler than the moisture-laden air). How wide is that gap? Poured bitumen MAY help, but may also make the situation worse... and you should know that pouring bitumen into the gap ...


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If it were mine, I'd excavate access space around the partially covered walls, down to the footings, and hot-mop with roofing tar to a point slightly above finished grade... ESPECIALLY if you're going to apply sealer to the inside surface. You want to prevent hydrostatic pressure from pushing moisture into the wall from outside, and especially to prevent ...


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I run mine at 60% during the summer. I do not run it during the winter because dehumidifiers do not work well as temps below 60F. Also, I always pipe my dehumidifiers into the plenum sump pumps so they are self-emptying.



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