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8

Condensation happens whenever hot air meets cold surfaces, and the air after a shower is hot and very humid. You'll always get some condensation, but there are a few things done to mitigate this: Normal interior walls and well-insulated exterior walls are usually not a lot colder than the air temperature. (The colder the walls are, the more condensation ...


8

I am going to weigh in although I haven't had time to check specs etc on a couple of products I have used in the past. High moisture levels in a concrete floor can come form only two sources, insuffiecent curing time (new concrete) or ground water. The informal test you did with the plastic patch is a sure sign of excessive moisture in the floor. This means ...


8

What you need to do is to keep the surfaces that moist air will touch warm so the condensation won't form in the first place. So, for windows that means installing double glazing so that the interior pane is the same temperature as the room and the outside pane can be a lot colder. For walls it's harder - but installing cavity wall insulation (assuming you ...


7

I would consider a dehumidifier which will pull moisture out of the air. I'd also check into why the wall is getting moist. Are you sure there is enough insulation in the wall, because you definitely should not have moisture condensing on or in the walls. An air conditioner will make the room colder which you probably don't want if the weather is already ...


7

From a comfort and water protection perspective, I think you'll find it beneficial to install a sub floor. I'd recommend one which allows for ventilation beneath it such as these 2x2 panels you can buy at Home Depot/Lowes Dricore This will give you a nice, warm "softer" surface to put your carpet pad on, and help protect from any condensation issues with ...


7

Multi-part answer here: It could be the water table, in which case, there's not a lot you can do. If it's the water table, then you'll have water seeping up through the floor. BUT consider that when they built the house, they dug a bowl in the ground, and then backfilled with loose soil, rocks and whatever other garbage they had lying around. You could ...


7

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


6

I have read that an iron can help lift those water marks off the table. If I remember correctly... Lay a dry cloth over the mark Heat the iron with the steam turned off Briefly iron the spot, gradually increasing the length of time you apply the heat I haven't tried it myself, so try it at your own risk.


5

This does not sound like it will work. If you are sure that the moisture is coming up from below, paint will not stop it, it will only seep under the paint and start making bubbles. DryLok is a good idea, but it isn't made for the type of treatment a floor gets, I don't believe it would stand up well even if you covered it with a good quality paint. I ...


5

Any sealant you put in will just have moisture build up under it and cause it to flake away after time, rot or disintegrate. The problem is that the soil has high content of moisture.. if it was not like this 5,10 years ago it is most likely it will get worse, as somewhere nearby the ground water level is rising for some reason. For most foundations on a ...


5

There is no paint-on or other surface treatment that will solve the problem. It may mitigate slightly, but under no circumstances will a surface application dry your basement enough to allow it to be finished. Any flooring will mold up pretty quickly. There are two solutions which will solve the problem: An internal solution, which is a french drain and a ...


5

Well, it rained pretty heavily the entire week while I was working, so I waited a day or two before drywalling to see if I could find a leak. I believe whatever was causing the problem was fixed. I think the mold there was from back when that window used to be a doorway. Here's my fix: The wall was very unlevel, so I went to Lowe's in search of Lath (my ...


4

The most common approach to dealing with flooded surfaces is to blow air across them. The constantly changing air absorbs moisture. Commercial companies use very high volume fans, but any fan should help. If you can exhaust the air from the room, the moisture level in the air should drop and more water will be absorbed from the floor. Use of a dehumidifier ...


4

You need vapour barrier (the plastic you put up before drywall) and air barrier. To count as an air barrier you stop air flow by using sheathing tape on: OSB joints and edges Vapour Barrier (this is most common) Tyvek Housewrap seams (becoming more common) Some people think that you only need a vapour barrier or that the vapour barrier is also an air ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


3

Nope, it shouldn't cause problems with moisture buildup -- but how much blown in fiberglass do you have up there? If it's less than your roof joists, it's not enough, and you should think about adding some (or a lot, actually) to bring you up to R-30 at the least in your attic. If you do have that much up there, but you moved some to the side to put down ...


3

I believe the answers above are a bit more realistic than others I've seen. Remember if air outside is 60% RH and the temp is 80°F that would be equal to about 75% RH with with a basement temp of 60°F. Keeping it around 55%-60% will be comfortable and obtainable with a decent dehumidifier.


3

The major cause of rust on machine tools is fast changes in temperature during humid weather. Imagine this scenario: you have a large pile of steel sitting in your cold garage at night. Because the garage is dug into a hill, if the garage is well-insulated, the temperature of the steel will be near the ground temperature, probably around 5 C. During the ...


3

Every air conditioner I've ever seen works not only to cool the air but also to pull moisture out of it. That's often why you get dripped on when you walk underneath a window unit. There might be condensation on the cooling coils, but more often than not the "conditioning" of the air includes bringing it down to a comfortable humidity: literally pulling ...


3

I completely disagree with BMitch here. If you live in an area with sustained freezing temperatures, you should have a plastic vapor barrier between the drywall and the studs, wherever "warm meets cold" (exterior walls, top floor ceiling). You want this vapor barrier inside your insulation so the barrier is toward the "warm" side of the thermal break ...


3

In the end, I ended up using DRYLOK® LATEX CONCRETE FLOOR PAINT It's holding up well so far, we'll see how it does over the next few years.


3

It sounds likely that you might have a minor leak somewhere perhaps. You haven't really mentioned where you live as that can have a big impact on the expected environment in the home. If you in a low lying area and have a basement it could be related to ground water in the area seeping into your basement. More than likely though you simply have a leak ...


3

DriCore is a subflooring that is specifically designed for light or occasional moisture. The portion of the product that touches the floor is all plastic and it lifts the upper portion more than 1/2 inch away from the concrete floor. The joints are fairly tight (although not actually sealed). It is intended to allow water to accumulate in the open spaces ...


3

One product I know of that is meant for this type of scenario is Dricore. It provides a moisture barrier from the floor. DRIcore has an integrate high density polyethylene membrane bonded to the underside of the panel which provides an excellent moisture barrier I've never used it personally though it seems pretty popular in my neck of the woods. I'd ...


3

I would definitely be concerned, mostly about mold but also about property damage (you said it's used for storage) and long-term foundation damage. If your downspouts are not properly discharging water away from your house then you definitely want to address this. In the grand scheme of wet basement solutions, this is probably the cheapest fix you will ...


3

Would moisture be trapped? To some extent. Is it bad? No, once concrete has been mixed and started to cure, keeping it moist helps it get stronger and this effect can go on for a long time. In no case will it ever make the concrete weaker. See the graph at the end of this URL: ...


3

No, there's no need to install a vapor barrier between two conditioned spaces. The purpose of a vapor barrier is to prevent warm moist air from traveling through the insulation and condensing on the cooler side, which can easily happen in cold climates. With a conditioned space on both sides, you can allow any moisture in the air to pass through. There's ...


2

It probably sweats because it isn't vented properly to the outside and blocked from the inside. If it's truly a cold area, it should be vented to the outside and also vapor blocked from the inside. Most likely hot wet air from your house is mixing with cold air in the cold room and condensing on the walls or something. They deal with these on episodes of ...


2

Increasing your wall thickness to facilitate 6in insulation is a fine idea, can't hurt. A vapor barrier of 4 mil plastic with taped seams should always be installed between the insulation and drywall. this will stop moisture from the outside from penetrating the back of the drywall and conversely, humidity from inside collecting in the insulation. T111 ...


2

Absolutely not. Drywall in a moist area is a sure fire way to get mold growth - you have to address the water issue first. Since the walls have no wood sheeting, you could use a closed cell spray foam insulation inside the walls applied directly to the back of the stucco. That will block water from getting in and act as a vapor barrier as well - then you ...



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