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16

Keep in mind that for inside corners, you shouldn't be using miter cuts at all -- you should cope them instead. That gives you a joint that appears mitered, but is more forgiving of slight errors and with less tendency to open up over time.


10

The difference between a 10" 60T and 80T saw blade is only slightly noticeable. In practice, chip out with either isn't a huge concern, provided you go slow. An 80T blade is naturally going to slow you down more, so that may be useful if your tendency is to yank the radial arm down and go. Another consideration is the end grain of the piece, some trees ...


9

There are two possible causes for this: Your room's corners aren't exactly 90°. Your mitre saw isn't accurate. Given you mention you are using a compound mitre saw I'm going to go with the former. Unfortunately with non-square rooms you're going to have to do this by a little bit of trial and error. Use some offcuts of the moulding or even scrap wood to ...


8

Measure in a foot or so from one inside corner and make a mark. Then measure from the opposite corner to your mark. Add the two measurements together for the full length. Note that this process is shown with pictures over on the blog.


7

Most crown molding is going to have to be cut flat on the table. the angles are going to be 52 degrees on the angle, and 38 degrees on the bevel. For your corners, you are going to want to cope them instead of trying to fit these angles. Coping is the proper way of installing any type of trim (crown mold, base, shoe molding, cherry rail ect.) How you ...


7

For an inside corner, don't concern yourself with mitering the moulding, instead cope the crown moulding. Basically what you do is cut one piece so it goes to the end of the wall. Cut the other piece at about a 38 degree angle and then cope the angled piece. It's a little hard to explain in text, but here's a picture and a link to the corresponding ...


4

It shouldn't be necessary. Some times it might be useful: Your hinge plates aren't flush to the surface of the door or the frame. You have a build-up of paint on the door or frame causing the door to rub or stick. Some wood splinters easily if it's cut at a right-angle. Rounding the corners a little can help this.


4

You could pick up a Bosch Miterfinder™ Digital Protractor Features Anglefinder — Determines the exact angles of jobsite or workpiece, eliminating guesswork. Compound Cut Calculator — Automatically determines the exact miter and bevel settings necessary to make each crown molding cut fit precisely. Protractor — precisely positions the workpiece or ...


4

Note that you don't need to cut crown moulding flat, you can just place it upside down with the top on the base of the miter saw and the wall side against the back of the saw. As ChrisF mentions, your walls won't be a perfect 90°. For inside corners, the mud from the drywall install will push the corner out, which will result in the back corners of the ...


3

Are you cutting with the board standing up in the saw like it will be positioned in the room, or with the board laying flat in the saw and using the compound setting to cut it? The reason I mention it is that I once borrowed a saw and it just wasn't as accurate using the compound setting (saw tilted). Swinging the saw left or right, there is usually a detent ...


3

I believe this was pretty standard practice when interior doors were solid wood. My last house was 100 years old, and every interior door had an angle on the edge the way you describe. Was the guy you saw doing it an old-timer? I think the practice has advantages. It allows you to get a smaller reveal between the door and frame, which might look better. ...


3

I watched the vid on Utube, very interesting. I don't use a slide chop saw for 2X4's (I use a 12" fixed) but that technique looks good to me. I think the reason is that taking two shallow passes is just as fast and doesn't load down the saw as much as a single pass. Since the angle of contact using a slide saw is much different than a fixed I can see why the ...


1

Cutting on the flat: If you are cutting on the flat there are lots of mitre/bevel charts online like this one: Cutting Nested: Have you tried nesting your crown? Hold the crown at the angle it would be on the wall, and just do a normal mitre (no need to worry about bevel). This is how I prefer to cut it, but everyone has their preferences. You can buy ...


1

I was looking for a reliable way to do this and came upon a phone app called Crown Molding King (Android OS - but I'm sure there are others for other OS). The app is free. Enter the angle of your wall and the app will calculate the Miter and Bevel.


1

The angle you need to cut is simply half the angle of the corner. So assuming it's a 90° corner you want 45°. However, most houses don't have exactly 90° corners (at least not in my experience) so you'll probably find that this produces a joint that doesn't fit. You'll have to resort to trial and error on some scrap pieces (as I outline here) to get a more ...



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